Asee peer logo

Computer Architecture Instruction For Students From Technically Diverse Backgrounds

Download Paper |

Conference

2000 Annual Conference

Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Publication Date

June 18, 2000

Start Date

June 18, 2000

End Date

June 21, 2000

ISSN

2153-5965

Page Count

8

Page Numbers

5.158.1 - 5.158.8

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/8225

Download Count

43

Request a correction

Paper Authors

author page

James J. Alpigini

Download Paper |

Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 2793

Computer Architecture Instruction for Students from Technically Diverse Backgrounds

James J. Alpigini Penn State Great Valley School of Graduate Professional Studies

Abstract The Master of Science in Information Science degree program at the Penn State Great Valley School of Graduate Professional Studies offers a blend of computer engineering, software engineering and management courses. These courses balance information science and management theories and allow a student to develop technical competence, leadership skills, and business expertise. A required foundation course in this program is CSE 431: Introduction to Computer Architecture, which is offered at the level of a senior undergraduate or first year graduate. Despite its fundamental nature, teaching the course represents a major challenge for the instructor due to the technically diverse background of the students, many of whom have non-technical backgrounds such as business or human services. Within this paper, the approach used to teach computer architecture to such a mixed student background is presented. Emphasis is given to the course content and tools utilized, as well as efforts to make the course challenging for the student, regardless of the student’s technical level.

I. Introduction

The Master of Science in Information Science (MSIS) is a relatively new and exciting degree program at the Penn State Great Valley School of Graduate Professional Studies. The MSIS program offers a synergistic blend of computer engineering, software engineering and management courses, which emphasize a balance of information science and management theories and thus enable the development of a students technical competence, leadership skills, and business expertise.

The MSIS program is organized as follows. After completing any necessary prerequisite coursework, a student begins the program by taking sequences of engineering and management core courses. These classes emphasize the fundamental aspects of information science, in terms of both theory and practice. Once the core courses are completed, a student will take a sequence of three core electives, selected from the both the management and engineering faculties. Next, a student will participate in a “capstone” course that is offered in a seminar format and encapsulates the entire program. Following the completion of the capstone course, a student will either write a professional paper, or take three additional approved technical electives. The degree requirements are summarized in Table 1.

Alpigini, J. J. (2000, June), Computer Architecture Instruction For Students From Technically Diverse Backgrounds Paper presented at 2000 Annual Conference, St. Louis, Missouri. https://peer.asee.org/8225

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2000 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015