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Computer Controlled Instrumentation Projects By Sophomore Level Eet Students

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Conference

2008 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Publication Date

June 22, 2008

Start Date

June 22, 2008

End Date

June 25, 2008

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Electrical ET Curriculum and Projects

Tagged Division

Engineering Technology

Page Count

13

Page Numbers

13.322.1 - 13.322.13

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/3460

Download Count

52

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Paper Authors

biography

Michael Dutko Bloomsburg University

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Mike is a junior in the EET program at Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania. He recently completed his co-op experience in designing electromechanical systems with Beck Actuators. Mike is looking forward to professional work in high-power electromechanical systems after graduation.

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biography

Cathy Auburger Bloomsburg University

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Cathy is a junior in the EET program at Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania. She recently completed her co-op experience in automated manufacturing systems with Harley-Davidson. Cathy is looking forward to professional work in a high-tech manufacturing facility after graduation.

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biography

Patrick Anderson Bloomsburg University

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Patrick is a junior in the EET program at Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania. He recently completed his co-op experience in wireless systems with Keystone Communications. Patrick is looking forward to professional work in the communication/networking area after graduation.

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Biswajit Ray Bloomsburg University

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Dr. Ray is a professor of electronics engineering technology at the Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania where he also serves as the EET program coordinator. He actively consults in the area of power electronic system design for U.S. Air Force and Naval Research Laboratoties.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Computer-Controlled Instrumentation Projects by Sophomore-Level EET Students

Abstract This paper presents student-initiated projects as part of an instrumentation and data acquisition course for sophomore-level electronics engineering technology students. Project objectives and associated assessment methodologies as well as general project management concepts are discussed. Two sample instrumentation projects reported in this paper are an automated street parking system and a computer-controlled bowling game system. Both projects focused on instrumentation system development integrating multiple sensors and actuators, data acquisition hardware, interface electronics, control logic implementation in LabVIEW software, and wood/metal work for prototype development. These end-of-semester course projects were carried out during the final four weeks of the semester after eleven weeks of lecture/laboratory session.

Introduction The ability to conduct and design experiments is rated as one of the most desirable technical skills of engineering and engineering technology graduates1. Specifically, the referenced survey indicates that employers want graduates with a working knowledge of data acquisition, analysis and interpretation; and an ability to formulate a range of alternative problem solutions. Additionally, potential employers of our EET graduates are in the automated manufacturing and testing sector of the industry providing additional motivation for an instrumentation and data acquisition course2 at the sophomore level of a four-year EET program. This course consists of two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Students have had courses in electrical circuit analysis, electrical machines, and analog and digital electronics before taking this course. The first three weeks of the fifteen-week semester are devoted primarily to LabVIEW programming. During the next eight weeks, the concepts and integration of sensors and actuators, interface electronics, and data acquisition and instrument control hardware /software are covered. The final four weeks are dedicated to student-initiated laboratory design projects3-6. This paper focuses on general approach to implementing end-of-semester course projects and associated assessment tools used to assess the project objectives. Technical details of two sample instrumentation projects, an automated street parking system and a computerized bowling game system, implemented during the spring-2007 semester are also presented.

Course project objectives and the associated assessment method The learning and teaching objectives for the project experience are listed in the next page. A list of questions was prepared based on the stated objectives, and the survey was conducted at the end of second and fourth week of the four-week project experience as an indirect assessment tool. The results of the first survey was used to improve the project experience during the second half, and the results of the second survey is to be used to improve the next offering of the instrumentation project experience in spring-2008. Students are also assessed using direct assessment tools for teamwork, oral presentation, final report, successful operation and demonstration of the completed project, and design review meetings. Example rubrics used to assess teamwork and oral presentation are shown in Appendices A and B, respectively. Results of direct and indirect assessment instruments are archived for use as an input to the course

Dutko, M., & Auburger, C., & Anderson, P., & Ray, B. (2008, June), Computer Controlled Instrumentation Projects By Sophomore Level Eet Students Paper presented at 2008 Annual Conference & Exposition, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. https://peer.asee.org/3460

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2008 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015