Asee peer logo

Computer Mediated Communication In A Distributed Design Studio

Download Paper |

Conference

2006 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Chicago, Illinois

Publication Date

June 18, 2006

Start Date

June 18, 2006

End Date

June 21, 2006

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Practice/Partnership/Program Issues

Tagged Division

Architectural

Page Count

8

Page Numbers

11.342.1 - 11.342.8

DOI

10.18260/1-2--455

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/455

Download Count

122

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Jeong Woo

visit author page

Jeong-Han Woo is an assistant professor of the Department of Engineering Technology at Western Illinois University. His research interests include knowledge management in the AEC industry, BIM (Building Information Model), IT( Information Technologies) on the design and construction industry, and construction process simulation. His e-mail address is j-woo@wiu.edu.

visit author page

author page

Robert Johnson Texas A&M University

author page

Mark Clayton Texas A&M University

Download Paper |

Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

COMPUTER-MEDIATED COMMUNICATION IN A DISTRIBUTED DESIGN STUDIO

Abstract

This paper introduces three case studies that implement the idea of Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) strategies to share and reuse tacit design knowledge in a distributed design environment. Prototype software was developed and tested in three design studios in which design students sought advice from experts in remote locations. It provides tools for showing images, such as drawings and renderings, and for engaging in a written dialogue (chat session). The written and graphic artifacts of the conversation are stored in a Web-accessible database.

The chat sessions included the identification, clarification, and explanation of real problems. Dialogue records provide evidence of a significant influence upon the students’ approach to conceptual design. Content analysis of the comments from the experts provides qualitative evidence for the software’s effectiveness. The participants shared past experience, professional recommendations, and intuitive expectations. This study also suggests that tacit design knowledge may be confidently captured and shared through careful strategic implementation of CMC technology in a distributed design environment.

Overview

This paper introduces three case studies that implement the idea of Computer-Mediated Communication (CMC) strategies to share and reuse tacit design knowledge in a distributed design environment. A review of literatures led to a theoretical framework for the exchange of tacit design knowledge in a distributed design environment. A software prototype was devised to operationalize the use of CMC. Three case studies were conducted using the software to validate the theoretical framework and gain insight into what occurs when design instructors purposely use CMC technologies to help architecture students attain specific instructional objectives. The case studies then provided evidence that tacit design knowledge can be shared and reused by using chat-based CMC strategies.

Theories of Tacit Knowledge

Tacit knowledge is the intangible form of human knowledge. Michael Polanyi7 is the first person who began to draw a distinction between explicit and tacit knowledge. Polanyi describes tacit knowledge as “very personal knowledge” constructed in a social context. He also asserts that tacit knowledge cannot be expressed in explicit languages as he says “We can know more than we can tell.”

Nonaka and Takeuchi6 recognized the importance of tacit knowledge and tried to demonstrate how to transfer personal tacit knowledge to shared mental models and technical skills. Their theoretical model is adopted as the foundation for the theoretical development for this research.

Woo, J., & Johnson, R., & Clayton, M. (2006, June), Computer Mediated Communication In A Distributed Design Studio Paper presented at 2006 Annual Conference & Exposition, Chicago, Illinois. 10.18260/1-2--455

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2006 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015