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Computing Across Curricula

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Conference

2008 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Publication Date

June 22, 2008

Start Date

June 22, 2008

End Date

June 25, 2008

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Programming for Engineering Students II

Tagged Division

Computers in Education

Page Count

16

Page Numbers

13.323.1 - 13.323.16

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/3471

Download Count

23

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Paper Authors

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Amy Craig North Carolina State University

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Amy E. Craig is the Coordinator of Student-Owned Computing in the College of Engineering and a doctoral student in the Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering at NC State University. She regularly teaches the Introduction to Engineering and Problem Solving course in the First Year Engineering Program. Her research interests include faculty development and teaching and learning in the engineering disciplines. She received her MIE and BSIE degrees from NC State University. Prior to her return to NC State, she worked as a Cost Engineer in the Personal Computing Division of IBM.

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Lisa Bullard North Carolina State University

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Lisa G. Bullard is a Teaching Associate Professor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at NC State University. She received her B.S. in ChE from NC State and her Ph.D. in ChE from Carnegie Mellon, and she served in engineering and management positions within Eastman Chemical Co. from 1991-2000.

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Jeff Joines North Carolina State University

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Tom Miller North Carolina State University

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Carolyn Miller North Carolina State University

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Carolyn S. Miller is a Lecturer in the Department of Computer Science at NC State University. She received her M.S. in Computer Science and worked as a Member of the Technical Staff at Bell Telephone Laboratories and a Senior Digital Systems Engineer at General Electric before joining NC State University. Ms. Miller teaches introductory computer science classes and focuses on researching and integrating new teaching techniques into the classroom.

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Dianne Raubenheimer

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Dianne Raubenheimer is Director of Assessment in the College of Engineering and Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Department of Adult and Higher Education in the College of Education at NCSU. She has worked with faculty and administrators in Engineering for three years, and previously in the Science and Education disciplines. She has a background in teacher education, curriculum development and evaluation and has worked as an education consultant for a number of organizations in the USA and South Africa conducting program evaluations. She received a Ph.D. in Educational Leadership and Organizational Development (Higher Education) from the University of Louisville and has M.Ed, M.Sc, B.Sc (Hons) degrees and a postgraduate Diploma in Adult Education from the University of Natal, Durban, South Africa.

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George Rouskas North Carolina State University

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Larry Silverberg North Carolina State University

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Eric Wiebe North Carolina State University

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Eric N. Wiebe is an Associate Professor in the Department of Mathematics, Science, and Technology Education at NC State University. He received his Doctorate in Psychology and has focused much of his research on issues related to the use of technology in the instructional environment. He has also worked on the integration of scientific visualization concepts and techniques into both secondary and post-secondary education. Dr. Wiebe has been a member of ASEE since 1989.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Computing Across Curricula

Abstract

Today’s somewhat disjointed approach to discipline-specific computing and generic computer literacy does not accurately mirror the knowledge, skills and abilities needed by the engineer of the future global workplace. Computing in the workplace is pervasive and involves many complex tools, many approaches to problem solving, strategic decision making and synthesis. Knowledge, comprehension and application are no longer enough for one to be labeled highly competent in computing. A successful engineer will need a mastery of computing applicable to the higher level cognitive skills of analysis, synthesis and evaluation, as well. To prepare students for pervasive, advanced computing in the workplace, we must begin to think in terms of pervasive, advanced computing in their education. This premise served as the basis for a project funded by the National Science Foundation CISE Pathways to Revitalized Undergraduate Computing Education (CPATH) initiative in 2007. The project is being carried out by the authors comprised of a multidisciplinary team of faculty from six departments in the College of Engineering and one from the College of Education at NC State University.

The project has two overarching goals: (1) create a computational thinking thread in the engineering curriculum that spans from the freshman to senior years and bridges the divide between freshman year computing and computing in upper-level classes, and (2) enable students to take computing competency to the next level, where they are able to perform high-level computing tasks within the context of a discipline. The first phase of the project entails the establishment of an academe-industry community in which stakeholders from a broad range of disciplines will convene to discuss the challenges and opportunities inherent in transforming the undergraduate computing education, and to identify and implement creative strategies to do so. The “Computing Across Curricula” (CAC) community includes involvement from a number of local industry leaders and is modeled after the nationally recognized NC State Campus Writing and Speaking Program1 that promotes writing across the curriculum.

To ensure that the goals and objectives of the project are met successfully, a detailed assessment process is an integral part of the ongoing activities. One research and assessment method being employed is the Delphi method. This formal communication process will be used to gather consensus among faculty, industry leaders and students in an effort to identify sets of computational skills vital for engineering professionals. Descriptions and reflections of the first year of project activities will be presented as well as plans for future activities. Preliminary assessment data will also be available.

1. Introduction

Two decades ago to say that an engineering graduate was highly competent in computing meant that he or she had mastered the FORTRAN programming language. A decade later it meant, in addition, mastering basic skills in a few key discipline-specific software tools, and a degree of proficiency in ubiquitous productivity applications such as spreadsheets and word processors. An engineering graduate who could do these things was said to be “computer literate.” Today,

Craig, A., & Bullard, L., & Joines, J., & Miller, T., & Miller, C., & Raubenheimer, D., & Rouskas, G., & Silverberg, L., & Wiebe, E. (2008, June), Computing Across Curricula Paper presented at 2008 Annual Conference & Exposition, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. https://peer.asee.org/3471

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2008 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015