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Concept Maps as an Assessment Tool for Evaluating Students' Perception of Entrepreneurial Mind-set

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Conference

2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Tampa, Florida

Publication Date

June 15, 2019

Start Date

June 15, 2019

End Date

June 19, 2019

Conference Session

Entrepreneurship & Engineering Innovation Division Technical Session 7

Tagged Division

Entrepreneurship & Engineering Innovation

Page Count

20

DOI

10.18260/1-2--32533

Permanent URL

https://strategy.asee.org/32533

Download Count

187

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Paper Authors

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Marissa Mary Martine Rowan University

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Marissa Martine is a sophomore Chemical Engineering major with a concentration in Honors Students and Material Science at Rowan University. She is also involved with the American Institute of Chemical Engineers and the Society of Women Engineers, and involved in research at the Sustainable Materials Research Laboratory at Rowan University.

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Lia X. Mahoney Rowan University

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She is a student at Rowan University for Mechanical Engineering with an strong interest in Acoustical Engineering.

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Christina M. Sunbury Rowan University

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Christina M Sunbury is an undergraduate student at Rowan University. She is working towards her bachelor’s in biomedical engineering with concentration in the honors college.

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John Austin Schneider Rowan University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-8110-0502

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John Schneider graduated from Rowan University in 2017 with a Bachelor’s degree in Chemical Engineering. He is currently pursuing his Master’s degree in Engineering Management at Rowan University. He is working under Dr. Scott Streiner in researching international engineering education. Specifically, his work is focused on intercultural wonderment and its relationship to global competency in engineering undergraduates.

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Cory Hixson Colorado Christian University

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After earning my B.S. in Engineering Science at Penn State University (2007), I began working as an audio-video engineer/designer. I then made a career transition to teach high school physics. Having sparked my love for education, I went back to school to earn my M.S. in Industrial & Systems Engineering (2015) and my Ph.D. in Engineering Education (2016). My first faculty job was at Rowan University in southern New Jersey, where I had the honor of helping develop their first-year engineering and B.S. in Engineering Entrepreneurship programs. I’m now blessed to be at CCU contributing to what God's doing through our Industrial & Systems Engineering program and university.

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Cheryl A. Bodnar Rowan University

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Cheryl A. Bodnar, Ph.D., CTDP is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Experiential Engineering Education at Rowan University. Dr. Bodnar’s research interests relate to the incorporation of active learning techniques in undergraduate classes as well as integration of innovation and entrepreneurship into the engineering curriculum. In particular, she is interested in the impact that these tools can have on student perception of the classroom environment, motivation and learning outcomes. She obtained her certification as a Training and Development Professional (CTDP) from the Canadian Society for Training and Development (CSTD) in 2010, providing her with a solid background in instructional design, facilitation and evaluation. She was selected to participate in the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) Frontiers of Engineering Education Symposium in 2013 and awarded the American Society for Engineering Education Educational Research Methods Faculty Apprentice Award in 2014.

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Abstract

With today’s growing competitive economic market, having an entrepreneurial mindset can be instrumental for success. An entrepreneurial mindset encompasses the way a person thinks about a new idea, product, or innovation [1]. It can include elements such as approaches to product development, the ability to mitigate risk, creating new professional networks, and the ability to accept failure [2]. Students in both engineering and business can benefit from these skills, as these skills have widespread application in today’s professional environments.

In order to better understand how both business and engineering students perceived the term “entrepreneurial mindset,” this study utilized concept mapping to visually elicit business and engineering students’ perspectives. Concept mapping is a useful assessment tool since it outlines relationships between ideas and concepts [3]. Using a concept map, it is possible to observe how students connect different attributes and topics to an overarching theme (in our case: “entrepreneurial mindset”). Two different methods of scoring concept maps were used: traditional and holistic. Using the concept maps, this study aimed to determine whether there were any observable differences between the two scoring methods. It also sought to determine whether concept maps produced by engineering undergraduates differed from those produced by business undergraduates

In total, 19 engineering students and 6 business students participated in this study. We found that holistic and traditional scoring methods provided similar evaluation of the concept maps. The scoring methods were only able to reproducibly score the lower scoring concept maps whereas the remaining maps showed more variability. These differences may be due to the priorities of each scoring method. Traditional scoring is based on the quantity of information portrayed and the ability to create connections between topics. Holistic scoring is based on the range of topics involved with the main subject, the structure of the concept map, and the quality and correctness of each concept and connection. There were no statistically significant differences found between the traditionally and holistically scored concepts maps for either major although a medium effect size was observed when comparing participants’ holistic comprehensiveness scores across disciplines.

Results from this study demonstrate that when seeking to evaluate students’ perceptions of an entrepreneurial mindset, the application of holistic scoring methods may be more effective in distinguishing detailed conceptual knowledge. Alternatively, the traditional scoring method may be more helpful when seeking a broader understanding of students’ knowledge of a concept. Overall, each scoring method has its own benefits and disadvantages; therefore, the evaluation method selected should be based upon the focus of the research.

References [1] P. Waychal and A. Ranade, “Integrating Innovative Entrepreneurship with Engineering Education,” 2016 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition Proceedings, Jun. 2016.

[2] C.A. Bodnar, R.M. Clark, M. Besterfield-Sacre, "Lessons Learned through Sequential Offerings of an Innovation and Entrepreneurship Boot Camp for Sophomore Engineering Students," Journal of Engineering Entrepreneurship, 6(1), pp. 52-67, 2015.

[3] M. Davies, "Concept mapping, mind mapping and argument mapping: What are the differences and do they matter?" Higher Education, 62(3), pp. 279-301, 2010.

Martine, M. M., & Mahoney, L. X., & Sunbury, C. M., & Schneider, J. A., & Hixson, C., & Bodnar, C. A. (2019, June), Concept Maps as an Assessment Tool for Evaluating Students' Perception of Entrepreneurial Mind-set Paper presented at 2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Tampa, Florida. 10.18260/1-2--32533

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