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Concept of a Human-Attended Lunar Outpost

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Conference

2016 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

New Orleans, Louisiana

Publication Date

June 26, 2016

Start Date

June 26, 2016

End Date

August 28, 2016

ISBN

978-0-692-68565-5

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Space Side of Aerospace

Tagged Division

Aerospace

Page Count

16

DOI

10.18260/p.26558

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/26558

Download Count

200

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Paper Authors

biography

Thomas W. Arrington Texas A&M University

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Thomas Arrington worked as the student Project Manager for the Human Attended Lunar Outpost senior design project for the the Department of Aerospace Engineering at Texas A&M University in College Station. He has interned with Boeing Research and Technology three times, and was an active member of the Texas A&M University Sounding Rocketry Team.

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Nicolas Federico Hurst Texas A&M 2015 Capstone Design Spacecraft

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Nico Hurst is a student of Texas A&M University. He recently graduated from the Aerospace Engineering department with my bachelor's of science and will be continuing his education with a master's of science in finance.

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David B. Kanipe Texas A&M University

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After receiving a BS in Aerospace Engineering in May 1970, followed by a MS in Aerospace Engineering in August 1971 from Texas A&M University, Mr. Kanipe accepted a position with NASA at the Manned Spacecraft Center in Houston and began his professional career in November 1972.
A month after his arrival at NASA, the last Apollo mission, Apollo 17, was launched. Obviously, that was exciting, but in terms of his career, the commencement of the Space Shuttle Program in November 1972 was to have far more impact. As a result, David was able to begin his career working on what he says was the most interesting and exciting project he could possibly imagine: the Space Shuttle.
Over his career, David held successively influential management positions including Deputy Branch Chief of the Aerodynamics Branch in the Aeroscience and Flight Mechanics Division, Chief of the GN&C Analysis and Design Branch, Deputy Chief of the Aeroscience and Flight Mechanics Division, and for the final 10 years of his career, Chief of the Aeroscience and Flight Mechanics Division in the Engineering Directorate at the Johnson Space Center.
Dave retired from NASA at the end of 2010 after more than 38 years of service in the US Space Program. His career spanned numerous projects and programs, including both crewed and robotic spacecraft. After retiring from NASA, the Head of the Aerospace Engineering Department at Texas A&M University asked him to come to A&M as a Senior Lecturer to teach a Senior Capstone Design course focusing on Spacecraft Design. In September 2014 he became an Associate Professor of Practice in the Aerospace Engineering Department at Texas A&M. He began his fourth year of teaching at Texas A&M in September 2014.

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Joanna M. Schiefelbein Texas A&M University

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Joanna M. Schiefelbein is a recent graduate of Texas A&M University with a Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering. Looking forward to a career in the space industry, Joanna customized her degree by pursuing minors in mathematics and astrophysics, taking electives in rocket propulsion and human spaceflight operations, and by working in an astronomical instrumentation lab. While at Texas A&M, she was active in Aggie Aerospace Women in Engineering (AAWE), Texas A&M Ballroom Dance Association (TAMBDA), and the local chapter of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). Joanna also received an Associate of Science in Engineering from South Texas College and is a member of Kappa Theta Epsilon and Phi Theta Kappa.

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David Charles Hyland Texas A&M University

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Educated at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dr. Hyland served at the MIT Lincoln Laboratory for 14 years until 1983. He then worked at the Harris Corporation as a Senior Scientist until 1996 at which time he joined the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, as Professor and Chairman of the Aerospace Department. He went to Texas A&M University in 2003 as Associate Vice Chancellor of Engineering, and Associate Dean. Dr. Hyland, is currently Royce E. Wisenbaker Chair of Engineering, Professor of Aerospace Engineering, and Adjunct Professor of Physics. Dr. Hyland’s current research interests include nanotechnologies for power collection and transmission and quantum processes for novel distributed imaging systems.

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Abstract

STUDENT PAPER

The concept of lunar habitation has long captivated the minds of science fiction fans and engineers alike. Despite this continued interest and the practical benefits of colonizing a nearby celestial object prior to more distant missions, little progress has been made to develop the methodology required to construct and sustain a lunar base. This is due to a unique series of challenges: harmful radiation from Solar Particle Events (SPE) and Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR), abrasive lunar dust, lack of air and water, and extreme distance from Earth. This paper will present one solution including the construction methods used to assemble the base as well as the various subsystems required to sustain human life. Construction will begin prior to human habitation through multiple phases. The initial launch will send a survey satellite to potential construction locations to obtain detailed topographical maps and measure the water content in the regolith. After the exact construction location has been chosen from the survey results, rovers will be launched to autonomously prepare the site. Subsequent launches prior to crew arrival will include communications satellites, further construction equipment, power systems, and several inflatable habitats. In this paper, the subsystems will be treated both independently and holistically. A review of their importance will be followed by a detailed analysis of each process as well as their methods for deployment and construction. It is important to note that the technologies discussed in this paper are utilized with a 2030 project deadline in mind. This introduces some speculative elements into the design which are addressed in reference to their Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) and mitigated by a standard Failure Mode Effects Analysis (FMEA) discussed later in the paper.

Arrington, T. W., & Hurst, N. F., & Kanipe, D. B., & Schiefelbein , J. M., & Hyland, D. C. (2016, June), Concept of a Human-Attended Lunar Outpost Paper presented at 2016 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, New Orleans, Louisiana. 10.18260/p.26558

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