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Conservation Of Energy For Campus Buildings: Design, Communication And Environmentalism Through Project Based Learning

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Conference

2006 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Chicago, Illinois

Publication Date

June 18, 2006

Start Date

June 18, 2006

End Date

June 21, 2006

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Energy Resources, Efficiency, and Conservation

Tagged Division

Energy Conversion and Conservation

Page Count

16

Page Numbers

11.355.1 - 11.355.16

DOI

10.18260/1-2--99

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/99

Download Count

147

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Paper Authors

biography

William Riddell Rowan University

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William Riddell is an Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Sophomore Clinic Coordinator at Rowan University. He recieved his Ph.D. from Cornell University, and his B.S. from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. His interests are in the safety, efficiency and durability of transportation and building systems.

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Peter Mark Jansson

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Peter Mark Jansson is an Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Rowan University teaching AC and DC electric circuits, power systems, sustainable design and renewable energy technologies. He leads numerous Sophomore, Junior and Senior Engineering Clinic Teams in solving real world engineering problems each semester. He received his PhD from the University of Cambridge, MSE from Rowan University and BSCE from MIT.

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Kevin Dahm Rowan University

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Kevin Dahm is an Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering at Rowan University. He received his Ph.D. from MIT and his B.S. from WPI. Among his areas of interest are computing and process simulation in the curriculum, and integrating economics and design throughout the curriculum. He has received the 2003 Joseph J. Martin Award and the 2002 PIC-III Award from ASEE.

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Harriett Benavidez Rowan University

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Harriett Benavidez teaches Public Speaking, Interpersonal Communication, and Sophomore Engineering Clinic II. Her research interests include small group and team communication and the role of interpersonal communication in military family life.

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Julie Haynes Rowan University

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Julie Haynes teaches Images of Gender in Popular Culture, Mass Media and Their Influences, Rhetorical Criticism, and the Seminar in Communication Studies. She also teaches Public Speaking and Public Speaking for Engineering students. Her research interests include: rhetorical dimensions of media and popular culture, rhetorical constructions of gender and feminist resistance rhetoric, rhetoric of social protest, and rhetoric of regional identity.

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Dan Schowalter Rowan University

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Dan Schowalter teaches Mass Media and Their Influences, Rhetorical Theory, Rhetorical Criticism, Public Speaking, and Senior Seminar. His research interests include the intersections of rhetorics, visuality, memory and the popular imagination, with special interest in rhetoric of documentary imagery.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Conservation of Energy for Campus Buildings: Design, Communication and Environmentalism through Project Based Learning Abstract

A project designed to conserve energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions resulting from operation of campus buildings has been developed and is being taught at Rowan University as part of Sophomore Engineering Clinic. The goals of Sophomore Clinic are to develop design and communication skills. This paper will discuss the framework of the class, with specific emphasis on how the project fits into the objectives of Sophomore Clinic, and disclose details to allow implementation of the project in similar project- based courses at other institutions. The technical aspects of conserving energy are well suited for introducing design. Introducing ethics and professionalism are also goals of the clinic sequence and a project on reducing greenhouse gas emissions is compatible with these goals.

Introduction

Engineering Clinics are a hallmark of the Rowan University College of Engineering.1-2 Each semester, Engineering students take a project-based clinic class that is developed through applications drawn from various engineering disciplines and industry. The purpose of the clinic courses is to prepare students for engineering practice in ways that traditional blackboard and textbook classes cannot. Solving open-ended problems, multidisciplinary teamwork and communication skills, as well as professionalism and ethics are emphasized throughout the clinics. As students progress throughout the Rowan curriculum, the clinic projects become decidedly more “real-world.”

The main goals of the Sophomore Engineering clinics are to develop communication and design skills, while continuing to foster real-world skills that are central to the Engineering Clinic series. Concurrent to developing design skills, students develop written (Fall Semester) and oral (Spring Semester) communication skills. Since a significant aspect of the real-world design process involves communication with customers and team-members, an integrated course in design and communication makes pedagogical sense. To this end, students have written and oral deliverables that are related to their design projects throughout the two semester series. A revised model for Sophomore Clinic was introduced in the summer of 2005. The revisions were influenced strongly by a recent paper by Dym, et al.3, and based on the premise that a progression of increasingly complex4 design projects is the best way to introduce students to design.

For the first project in Fall 2005, student teams spent 4 weeks designing a rocket made from a soda bottle and propelled by water and compressed air.5 The design objective was a rocket that flies the longest distance possible. To simplify this design project, the initial launch angle, water pressure at launch, and the size of the bottle, are given as constraints. After the first day, students are asked to develop a wing design that can be completely described by a single parameter (e.g., the length of one leg of a triangle). As a result of these simplifications the first project is an exercise in parametric design. Convergence

Riddell, W., & Jansson, P. M., & Dahm, K., & Benavidez, H., & Haynes, J., & Schowalter, D. (2006, June), Conservation Of Energy For Campus Buildings: Design, Communication And Environmentalism Through Project Based Learning Paper presented at 2006 Annual Conference & Exposition, Chicago, Illinois. 10.18260/1-2--99

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2006 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015