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Content Generation: Lessons Learned From A Successful High School Science And Mathematics Outreach Program

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Conference

2003 Annual Conference

Location

Nashville, Tennessee

Publication Date

June 22, 2003

Start Date

June 22, 2003

End Date

June 25, 2003

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

K-12 Outreach Initiatives

Page Count

8

Page Numbers

8.319.1 - 8.319.8

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/12656

Download Count

37

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Paper Authors

author page

Eric Roe

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 2530

Content Generation: Lessons Learned From a Successful High School Science and Mathematics Outreach Program

Eric A. Roe1, Joseph D. Hickey1, Andrew Hoff2, Richard A. Gilbert1, and Marilyn Barger3 1 Department of Chemical Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620 2 Department of Electrical Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620 3 Manufacturing Technology, Hillsborough Community College, Brandon, FL 33619

Abstract

The High School Technology Initiative (HSTI) is an educational materials development team at the University of South Florida. This team is comprised of high school educators from Hillsborough and Polk Counties, Hillsborough Community College faculty, University of South Florida faculty, graduate students, animators and graphic designers. After developing its first educational module, “Problem Solving with High Technology Examples”, HSTI secured NSF funding for the development of two additional modules, for testing of all three modules and for development of accompanying teacher training courses.

HSTI’s goal is to create products that seamlessly integrate into the current high school curriculum, while providing high technology examples for the students and background materials for the instructors. From the beginning, HSTI’s modules are created with the educators needs in mind. They are designed to supplement the current classroom curriculum, not supplant it. Each module is comprised of units that support the overall module theme. These units contain presentations, activities, handouts, exercises, and quizzes that the instructor can incorporate into their curriculum.

Content generation for the units within a module is a carefully managed process utilizing the resources from all of the development team members. This paper will present some of the lessons learned from development of module content to module testing, focusing on the intermediary steps of content development, technology infusion, and module organization. Hopefully, this window on our process will assist other developers who are working to enrich the educational resources available to high school science and mathematics instructors and their students.

Introduction

The High School Technology Initiative (HSTI) was formed to develop materials to supplement high school science and mathematics curriculum that convey methods of solving modern technological problems and emphasize how technology affects students’ lives. By providing

“Proceedings of the 2003 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright © 2003, American Society for Engineering Education”

Roe, E. (2003, June), Content Generation: Lessons Learned From A Successful High School Science And Mathematics Outreach Program Paper presented at 2003 Annual Conference, Nashville, Tennessee. https://peer.asee.org/12656

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