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Control System Design And Implementation Using The Motor Controls Toolkit – The Robot Car

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Conference

2008 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Publication Date

June 22, 2008

Start Date

June 22, 2008

End Date

June 25, 2008

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Hardware Descriptive Language Education

Tagged Division

Computers in Education

Page Count

19

Page Numbers

13.335.1 - 13.335.19

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/3545

Download Count

392

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Paper Authors

biography

Jonathan Hill University of Hartford

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Dr. Jonathan Hill is an Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering in the College of Engineering, Technology, and Architecture (CETA) at the University of Hartford, located in Connecticut. Ph.D. and M.S. from Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) and Bachelor's degree in Electrical Engineering from Northeastern University. Previously an applications engineer with the Networks and Communications division of Digital Corporation. His interests involve embedded microprocessor based systems.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Control System Design and Implementation Using the Motor Controls Toolkit – The Robot Car

Abstract

This paper describes the development of the Motor Controls Toolkit (MCT) for a series of control system experiments. We intend to eventually use the MCT with an off-the-shelf hobby type car type chassis. This combination of hardware provides a portable, relatively inexpensive platform that can be used for high school or college level classroom demonstrations or for an undergraduate laboratory or independent study in control and automation. The kit provides opportunities to study controls principles, signal processing, and simple power electronics.

The MCT consists of a Xilinx field programmable gate array (FPGA) development board interfaced with a daughterboard that contains drive electronics for the motor, interface logic for an optical encoder, a breadboard for prototyping, and connectors for interfacing with other hardware. An H-bridge circuit, using pulse-width modulation, controls motor speed. The toolkit is small so that it can be secured to an off-the-shelf hobby type car chassis. Using an FPGA to control the kit provides great flexibility. An instructor can optionally consider a variety of peripherals. By means of a soft-core microprocessor system, the FPGA will control the car and will operate autonomously. Sensors collect data which the FPGA uses to control the motor.

The toolkit is currently being developed. This spring semester graduate students will be involved in its further implementation. Students will be able to use the toolkit to investigate pulse-width modulation, optical encoders, a D.C. motor model, and a simple speed control feedback loop. Classic controls examples that are possible include the inverted pendulum, cruise control, and advanced motor control. The FPGA development board is able to communicate with a PC. This communication allows the user to understand what information is being read by the sensors and how the FPGA is programmed to respond. This kit provides several experiments and demonstrations which can be shown to prospective engineering students or undergraduates in a control and automation course.

Introduction

We are developing the Motor Controls Toolkit (MCT) for use in a series of control system experiments. The MCT consists of a Xilinx field programmable gate array (FPGA) development board interfaced with a daughterboard that contains drive electronics for the motor, interface logic for an optical encoder, a breadboard for prototyping, and connectors for interfacing with other hardware. We intend to eventually use the MCT with an off-the-shelf hobby type car type chassis. This combination of hardware provides a portable, relatively inexpensive platform that can be used for high school or college level classroom demonstrations or for an undergraduate laboratory or independent study in control and automation. The kit provides opportunities to study controls principles, signal processing, and simple power electronics.

Hill, J. (2008, June), Control System Design And Implementation Using The Motor Controls Toolkit – The Robot Car Paper presented at 2008 Annual Conference & Exposition, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. https://peer.asee.org/3545

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