Asee peer logo

Course Redesign – Embedding High-impact Practices (HIPS) in STEM Courses

Download Paper |

Conference

2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual On line

Publication Date

June 22, 2020

Start Date

June 22, 2020

End Date

June 26, 2021

Conference Session

NSF Grantees: Student Learning 1

Tagged Topic

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

6

DOI

10.18260/1-2--34341

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/34341

Download Count

17

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Huanying Gu New York Institute of Technology

visit author page

Dr. Gu is a professor of computer science in NYIT College of Engineering and Computing Sciences. Her research interests include data mining, data analysis, ontologies, object-oriented modeling, conceptual modeling, and medical informatics, with an emphasis on controlled medical terminologies.

Dr. Gu's research has been supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the UMDNJ foundation, the PDR network, and NYIT ISRC grants. Her honors include the Dean's Award for Excellence in Research from the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey and Annual Faculty Scholars Awards from NYIT. She is a member of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) and has served as a reviewer for journals and conferences on medical informatics.

Gu received her Ph.D. in computer science from New Jersey Institute of Technology. Prior to joining NYIT, she was an associate professor of Health Informatics at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (now part of Rutgers University).

visit author page

biography

N. Sertac Artan New York Institute of Technology

visit author page

N. Sertac Artan is an Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at New York Institute of Technology (NYIT) College of Engineering and Computing Sciences. He received his Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from New York University (formerly Polytechnic University). Before joining to NYIT, Dr. Artan was on the faculty of the New York University School of Engineering. He also worked as an ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit) Design Engineer and designed integrated circuits for commercial, academic and military applications.
Dr. Artan served in the organizing committees of the ACM/IEEE Symposium on Architectures for Networking and Communications Systems (ANCS), IEEE Sarnoff Symposium, and ACM Conference on Security and Privacy in Wireless and Mobile Networks.

visit author page

biography

Ziqian Dong New York Institute of Technology

visit author page

Ziqian Dong is an Associate Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the New York Institute of Technology (NYIT). She received her B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from BeiHang University (formerly Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics), Beijing, China, M.S. and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), Newark, NJ. She was awarded the Hashimoto Prize for the best Ph.D. dissertation in Electrical Engineering, NJIT in 2008. She is the recipient of 2006 and 2007 Hashimoto Fellowship for outstanding scholarship, the New Jersey Inventors Hall of Fame Graduate Student Award for her inventions in network switches, and NYIT Presidential Engagement Award in Student Engagement in Research and Scholarhip in 2015. Her research interests include architecture design and analysis of high-performance packet switches, data center networks, network security and forensics, wireless sensor networks, and assistive medical devices. Her research has been supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF), Motorola, National Collegiate Alliance for Inventors and Innovators, Xilinx, and NYIT. She is a senior member of the IEEE Communications Society, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Women in Engineering, and a member of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE), Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), and the Environmental Sensing, Networking and Decision-Making (ESND) technical committee. She has served in technical program committee of IEEE High Performance Switching and Routing, IEEE Sarnoff, IEEE GreenCom and ChinaCom, and as a reviewer for IEEE journals, conferences and NSF panels. For more information, please visit: http://iris.nyit.edu/~zdong02

visit author page

biography

Reza Amineh New York Institute of Technology

visit author page

Reza K. Amineh is currently an Assistant Professor at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, NYIT. Prior to NYIT, he was a principal scientist at the Department of Sensor Physics at Halliburton Co. He received his Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from McMaster University, Canada, in 2010. He was a post-doctoral fellow at University of Toronto and McMaster University, from 2012 to 2013 and from 2010 to 2012, respectively. He was a Ph.D. intern with the Advanced Technology Group, BlackBerry, in 2009. He has authored/co-authored over 65 journal and conference papers, and two book chapters. He contributed in more than 40 patent disclosures in applied electromagnetics while working at Halliburton Co and received several industrial awards. His research interests include applied electromagnetics with applications in imaging and sensing, antennas and microwave components design, and nondestructive testing among the others. Amineh was a recipient of the Banting Post-Doctoral Fellowship from the Government of Canada in 2012 and the Ontario Ministry of Research and Innovation (OMRI) Post-Doctoral Fellowship in 2010. During his Ph.D. program, he was awarded the McMaster Internal Prestige Scholarship Clifton W. Sherman for two consecutive years. He has co-authored an Honorable Mention Paper presented at the IEEE Symposium on Antennas and Propagation, and the International Union of Radio Science, in 2008. He has also co-authored a paper selected among the journal of Inverse Problems’ “Highlights Collection of 2010”. Amineh is a senior member of IEEE.

visit author page

biography

Houwei Cao New York Institute of Technology

visit author page

Dr. Houwei Cao is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science at New York Institute of Technology (NYIT). She was an adjunct professor at the Computer Science and Engineering Department of the Tandon School of Engineering of New York University before joining NYIT. She obtained her PhD degree in Electronic Engineering from the Chinese University of Hong Kong in 2011, and was a postdoctoral fellow at University of Pennsylvania from 2011 to 2014. Her main areas of research are signal processing, machine learning, data mining and their applications in human-centric data analytics, with emphasis on developing computational methods, algorithms, and models for speech recognition, natural language processing, multimodal affective computing, social network analysis, and healthcare information systems. She won the audio-visual emotion recognition challenge (AVEC) in 2012. Dr. Cao is a member of International Speech Communication Association (ISCA), the Association for the Advancement of Affective Computing (AAAC), and IEEE. She has served as program committee members and/or reviewers for more than ten journals and conferences in speech and language processing, affective computing, and computer vision.

visit author page

biography

Sarah McPherson New York Institute of Technology

visit author page

Dr. McPherson is currently President of EDA Solutions consulting, and serving as evaluator of three NSF grants awarded to New York Institute of Technology (NYIT), College of Engineering and Computer Science. She is recently retired as Associate Professor and Chair of Instructional Technology and Educational Leadership graduate programs at NYIT School of Education.
Dr. McPherson has experience in national and international projects, such Social Media in Education in Abu Dhabi, UAE; Developing Learning Objectives and Assessment Strategies in Curriculum for Cleaner Production for a US State Department project in Latin America; Technology Enriched Instruction Microsoft Teacher Education Initiative Faculty Workshop Series at several locations worldwide, UNESCO meeting in Thailand, S. Korea, Malaysia, Australia and Mexico. She has presented papers on Strategies and Resources for Preparing Teachers for STEM Teaching and Learning at the Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference in Alexandria, VA. and a paper on Preparing STEM Teachers for K-12 Classrooms:Graduate Certificate Evaluation and Innovation at the 4th IEEE Integrated STEM Education Conference, at Princeton. In addition to numerous articles and presentations, she published a book chapter titled Preparing Teachers in Technology for STEM Education: Strategies and Resources for Integrating Technology for 21st Century Teachers and co-edited a book titled Student, Environment, Task and Technology Tools for the 21st Century Learner. Dr. McPherson has served as a Commissioner on the Continuous Improvement (CI) Commission/Accreditation, Council of Accreditation for Educator Preparation (CAEP); Standards Review Committee, Council of Accreditation for Educator Preparation (CAEP). and Program Reviewer and Auditor, International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) for National Educational Standards for Teachers, Technology and Technology Coaches. She currently serves as lead reviewer for the ISTE Higher Education Recognition program.
Dr. McPherson has M.S. and Ed.D. degrees from Johns Hopkins University.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract

(NSF S-STEM project) High-Impact Practices (HIPs) will ensure that students have access to well-designed, engaging academic experiences. Incorporating HIPs into courses can increase student engagement and learning. The HIPs approach promotes active learning characterized by: a) an emphasis on the interaction of students with their instructor through in-class activities; b) collaborative instruction between the student, the instructor and peers about substantive matters; c) instruction providing heads-on and hands-on experiences; d) frequent feedback and guidance for improvement; and, e) connections of disciplinary content and applications of knowledge and skills to real-world problems. However, HIPs can only make a difference if the faculty are equipped with the proper pedagogical tools to adopt them in their classrooms. To support the faculty in developing HIPs in their courses, the New York Institute of Technology Center for Teaching and Learning conducted a 5-day summer Course Redesign Institute. During the Institute, participating faculty members reimagined their courses from the learner’s point of view and redesigned them to promote significant and enduring learning. In this paper, we describe the multi-step process for course design and the “spiral approach” for course redesign. Lessons learned from previous semesters are incorporated into any needed redesign and/or refinements of the HIPs as part of the process for updating each course syllabus each semester. Two courses serve as examples to demonstrate how to implement HIPs in basic STEM engineering courses.

Gu, H., & Artan, N. S., & Dong, Z., & Amineh, R., & Cao, H., & McPherson, S. (2020, June), Course Redesign – Embedding High-impact Practices (HIPS) in STEM Courses Paper presented at 2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual On line . 10.18260/1-2--34341

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2020 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015