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COVID-19's Impact on on ECE Communities Served by Minority Serving Institutions

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Conference

2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access

Location

Virtual Conference

Publication Date

July 26, 2021

Start Date

July 26, 2021

End Date

July 19, 2022

Conference Session

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Tagged Topics

Diversity and NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

11

DOI

10.18260/1-2--36862

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/36862

Download Count

44

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Paper Authors

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Kenneth A. Connor Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

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Kenneth Connor is an emeritus professor in the Department of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering (ECSE) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) where he taught courses on electromagnetics, electronics and instrumentation, plasma physics, electric power, and general engineering. His research involves plasma physics, electromagnetics, photonics, biomedical sensors, engineering education, diversity in the engineering workforce, and technology enhanced learning. He learned problem solving from his father (who ran a gray iron foundry), his mother (a nurse) and grandparents (dairy farmers). He has had the great good fortune to always work with amazing people, most recently the members and leadership of the Inclusive Engineering Consortium (IEC) from HBCU and HSI ECE programs and the faculty, staff and students of the Lighting Enabled Systems and Applications (LESA) ERC, where he was Education Director until his retirement in 2018. He was RPI ECSE Department Head from 2001 to 2008 and served on the board of the ECE Department Heads Association (ECEDHA) from 2003 to 2008. He is a Life Fellow of the IEEE.

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Kathy Ann Gullie Gullie Consultant Services LLC

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Gullie Consultants Services LLC,
Owner, Dr. Kathy A. Gullie Ph.D.
Dr. Kathy Gullie and her associates at Gullie Consultant Services LLC have been in education, assessment, program development and evaluation in New York State for over 30 years. A former New York State teacher for 36 years, Dr. Gullie is committed to the improvement of education for students in all areas and education levels. Collectively, along with members of the team, Gullie Consultant Services LLC. has served as external evaluators for school districts, federal and state agencies, not-for-profit organizations, and institutions of higher education in New York State, as well as from around the country. Some of our past clients include: The National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Education, The New York State Department of Education, New York State VESID, State University of New York at Albany/SUNY, the State University of New York at Binghamton/SUNY, New York Institute of Technology (NYIT), Howard University, Morgan University and New York City Board of Education.

More specifically, Dr. Gullie has served the principal investigator/evaluator on several educational grants including: an NSF engineering grant supporting Historically Black University and Colleges through Howard University, the Syracuse City School District Title II B Mathematics and Science Partnership grants, Building Learning Communities to Improve Student Achievement: Albany City School District, Educational Leadership Program Enhancement Project at Syracuse University and the University at Albany through the Teacher Leadership Quality Program. She holds an advance degree in Educational Theory and Practice from the University of New York/SUNY Albany, with experience in teaching educational methods at the master’s level as well as an introduction to education courses designed to develop new interest in teaching careers. She has worked as an elementary classroom teacher developing specific curricula for gifted and talented students as well as inclusion classrooms in a school district eligible for rural and low-income programs. Dr. Gullie’s experience and past projects qualify her for the position of evaluator to examine the impact of the Alliance: Pathways to Success in Engineering (PASE). Her experience and qualifications working with data from multiple educational projects and personal work with students give her an in-depth understanding of the developmental nature of students participating

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Barry J. Sullivan Inclusive Engineering Consortium

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Barry J. Sullivan is Director of Program Development for the Inclusive Engineering Consortium. His 40-year career includes significant experience as a researcher, educator, and executive in industry, academia, and the non-profit sector. He has developed and delivered continuing education courses in communications technologies, and he guided the technology strategy for a start-up company delivering packet voice services. He was a full-time member of the faculty of the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Northwestern University for more than six years, and has taught there as an adjunct faculty member. He also worked as a member of technical staff at Bell Laboratories. He received the B.S.E.E. and M.S. degrees from Marquette University, and the Ph.D. degree from Princeton University, all in electrical engineering.

Dr. Sullivan has served as an associate editor of the IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing, publications chair of the International Conference on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing, and local arrangements chair for the Digital Signal Processing Workshop. He was also editor of THE BRIDGE, the magazine of Eta Kappa Nu. He has published over forty papers on topics in signal reconstruction and image processing.

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Megan Bekolay

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Dean T. Spaulding

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Dr. Spaulding is a program evaluator serving as an external evaluator on this NSF project.

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Mandoye Ndoye Tuskegee University

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Mandoye Ndoye received the B.S.E.E. degree from the Rensselear Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, in 2002, the MS degree in Mathematics and the Ph.D. degree in electrical and computer engineering from Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, in 2010. After completing his Ph.D. studies, he joined the Center of Applied Scientific Computing, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, as a Research Staff Member. From 2012 to 2014, he was a Research Associate at Howard University. Since 2014, he has been with the Department of Electrical Engineering, Tuskegee University, Tuskegee, AL where he is an Associate Professor. His research interests center on signal/image processing, sensor data analytics, intelligent infrastructure systems and power systems optimization.

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Otsebele E. Nare Hampton University

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Otsebele Nare is an Associate Professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at Hampton University, VA. He received his electrical engineering doctorate from Morgan State University, Baltimore, MD, in 2005. His research interests include Multiobjective System Level Synthesis Techniques and K-16 Integrative STEM education.

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Abdelnasser A. Eldek Jackson State University

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Dr. Abdelnasser A. Eldek obtained his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering in 2004 from the University of Mississippi. Currently, he is Professor and Coordinator of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Jackson State University. His main research areas include Applied Electromagnetics, Antennas, Phased Arrays, RF/Microwave Circuits, Metamaterial, and Numerical Methods.

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Abstract

The {organization name deleted} is a novel collaboration among ECE programs at nearly 20 Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs). Its member schools are among the top producers of African American and Hispanic engineers. It has been working to build an organization that can enable the participating faculty, students and staff to engage fully in the national education and research enterprise. The COVID-19 Pandemic has put everyone at its partner institutions under unprecedented stress as campus operations moved online. It was essential that the experiences of the minority communities served be captured, especially during the critical spring 2020 semester when the move to distance delivery of classes was necessary. Lessons were learned and applied in the summer (in both courses offered and a large REU/RET program) and fall as universities worked to improve the learning experiences of their students. In addition to enhancing distance education efforts, nearly every tool and idea applied is a potential candidate for the infrastructure, programs and processes that can make it possible for the organization to realize its vision of enabling its partners to act in concert as a virtual super department.

The {organization name deleted} grew out of a joint engineering education project in which a network of collaborators from many institutions worked together to give hands-on experimentation a central role in all ECE courses that involved circuits or electronics. The educational research that was pursued focused on documenting and understanding the impact of a personal instrumentation based pedagogy and its enabling technology as a treatment to improve student learning and retention. In the present effort, a similar approach is followed. The treatment is now distance delivery and learning and enabling technology includes tools for online meetings, forums, homework and quizzes.

Key research questions being addressed include: What were the challenges and improvements faculty observe in student interactions and outcomes through the online format? What do we need to know ahead of time to change an engineering course into an online format for students? What does a course need to look like to meet the needs of students? What infrastructure is necessary to create and maintain a successful online course? What is the impact of an online centered course on student outcomes?

The great distance learning experiment is sweeping the nation’s colleges and universities and wreaking havoc with their ability to deliver a high quality learning experience for their students. The MSIs who make up the {organization name deleted} are uniquely positioned to rapidly capture the experiences of minority engineering students and their instructors using the tools and approaches from their previous educational project.

ECE has historically been one of the largest programs in engineering so it is a reasonable choice to be broadly representative and provide a model for other disciplines. In addition, the existence of a solidly functioning network of collaborators from many MSIs significantly increases the potential for success.

Connor, K. A., & Gullie, K. A., & Sullivan, B. J., & Bekolay , M., & Spaulding , D. T., & Ndoye, M., & Nare, O. E., & Eldek, A. A. (2021, July), COVID-19's Impact on on ECE Communities Served by Minority Serving Institutions Paper presented at 2021 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference Content Access, Virtual Conference. 10.18260/1-2--36862

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2021 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015