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Creating A “Global Algorithm” For Engineering Education

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Conference

2006 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Chicago, Illinois

Publication Date

June 18, 2006

Start Date

June 18, 2006

End Date

June 21, 2006

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Collaborative & New Efforts in Engineering Education

Tagged Division

International

Page Count

11

Page Numbers

11.366.1 - 11.366.11

DOI

10.18260/1-2--1011

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/1011

Download Count

92

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Paper Authors

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Samuel Scheibler Milwaukee School of Engineering

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Dr. Samuel Scheibler is the Pieper Family Endowed Chair in Servant-Leadership and Distinguished Lecturer in General Studies at the Milwaukee School of Engineering. He received a doctorate degree from Biola University in 1991 and has degrees in cultural anthropology and church history as well as theology and intercultural communications. He has books and articles on topics ranging from German folk customs to international business ethics, and has served as a consultant to the United Nations, the World Trade Organization, the Walt Disney Company, the International Olympic Committee, US government, and eight foreign nations.

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Stephen Williams Milwaukee School of Engineering

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Dr. Stephen Williams is Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE). He received the Ph.D. degree from the University of Missouri in 1990 and has 20 years of experience across the corporate, government, and university sectors. He is a registered Professional
Engineer in Wisconsin. He teaches courses in control systems, electronic design, and electromechanics.

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Joerg Mossbrucker Milwaukee School of Engineering

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Dr. Mossbrucker is Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE). He did graduate studies at Michigan State University and received the Ph.D. degree from the University of Kaiserslautern, Germany. He has extensive industrial experience and teaches courses in analog and digital circuits, microprocessors, and computer programming.

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Glenn Wrate Milwaukee School of Engineering

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Dr. Wrate is Program Director of Electrical Engineering and Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE). He received the Ph.D. degree from the Michigan Technological University in 1996. He has extensive industrial experience and with a primary focus in power and control systems. He is a member of IEEE, a registered Professional Engineer in California, and has held numerous positions in the ASEE Energy Conversion and Conservation Division.

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Owe Petersen Milwaukee School of Engineering

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Dr. Petersen is Department Chair and Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE). He is a former Member of Technical Staff at AT&T Bell Laboratories and received his Ph.D. degrees from the University of Pennsylvania in 1971. He is a Senior Member of the IEEE and an ABET EAC program evaluator in Electrical Engineering.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Creating a "Global Algorithm" for Engineering Education

Abstract

For five generations American engineering education has rested upon a practical model of drawing a broad range of students with certain mathematical skills and wide technological interests into a large-mouthed pedagogic funnel, gradually compressing their training into ever- narrower frames of specific, skill-sets and acumens. The result has been to standardize the end- products emerging from the apex of the educational funnel. Examinations and re-toolings of engineering education have usually merely redirected the funnel with recommendations of new methods and protocols for fine-tuning the relevance of contemporary technology to the classroom and laboratory. One canon remains constant: engineering education has maintained an approximately 80/201 curricular equilibrium between technical/non-technical requirements and emphases. Conventional wisdom and practical experience stress that this emphasis upon technical proficiency has assured American domination of engineering education for most of the last century.

A seismic shift in technology, manufacturing, and economics is occurring as we enter the new millennium. Global currents once far removed from the engineering classroom have become irrevocably intertwined with both the process and product of engineering education. A paradigmatic readjustment equal in impact is necessary to meet the global challenges faced by today’s engineering students.

The Challenge: The core competencies, created and honed in the 80/20 funnel of engineering education, must be retained to assure technical competency. Simultaneously, engineering education must introduce more of a 50/50 balance in the final educational outcomes of the graduate between the technical and nontechnical competencies. i.e., the educational process must embrace much broader parameters of global/professional/personal competencies without compromising up-to-date technical expertise. This can only be accomplished by adopting creative concurrencies in curricular development. The personal and professional skills necessary to compete on the global stage of 21st century engineering must be included as aggregates (packet aggregation) to technical skill development. The tube of the funnel must be widened.

If the fundamental principle of the first five years of the millennium was multi-tasking in a lean manufacturing and professional environment, multi-identity competence (in the surge rather than in the wake) of globalization must be the foundation of the coming years. Preparing the next generation of engineers to enter this world with a competitive advantage requires inventive, resourceful, and continuously evolving methods to instill parallel intercultural communication, global resource management, and interpersonal professional training alongside the requisite and non-negotiable technically related subjects of the discipline.2

Scheibler, S., & Williams, S., & Mossbrucker, J., & Wrate, G., & Petersen, O. (2006, June), Creating A “Global Algorithm” For Engineering Education Paper presented at 2006 Annual Conference & Exposition, Chicago, Illinois. 10.18260/1-2--1011

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