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Creating an Experimental Structural Dynamics Laboratory on a Shoe-string Budget

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Conference

2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Seattle, Washington

Publication Date

June 14, 2015

Start Date

June 14, 2015

End Date

June 17, 2015

ISBN

978-0-692-50180-1

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Educational Strategies in Architectural Engineering

Tagged Division

Architectural

Page Count

9

Page Numbers

26.417.1 - 26.417.9

DOI

10.18260/p.23756

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/23756

Download Count

295

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Paper Authors

biography

Peter Laursen P.E. California Polytechnic State University

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Dr. Peter Laursen, P.E., is an Associate Professor of Architectural Engineering at the California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo (Cal Poly) where he teaches courses on the analysis and design of structural systems including laboratory courses.

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biography

Cole C McDaniel California Polytechnic State University

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Dr. Cole McDaniel, P.E., is a Professor of Architectural Engineering at the California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo (Cal Poly) where he teaches courses on the analysis and design of structural systems with a focus on seismic behavior.

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biography

Graham C. Archer P.Eng California Polytechnic State University

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Dr. Graham Archer, P.Eng., is a Professor of Architectural Engineering at the California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo (Cal Poly) where he teaches courses on the analysis and design of structural systems.

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Abstract

Creating an Experimental Structural Dynamics Laboratory on a Shoe-string BudgetEducating architectural engineers in aspects of structural dynamics is essential. Whenarchitectural engineering students graduate and enter the workforce they will be faced withanalyzing and designing a variety of structural systems. Oftentimes sophisticated analyticalmodels are created to model the dynamic response of buildings subjected to dynamic loading.Commonly these models rely on the modal superposition method resulting in natural frequenciesand modes shapes. The objective of the course is to enhance student learning with student-ledexperimentation that complements the normal textbook theoretical material and homework.This paper describes the development of a course proposal for the graduate level course“Experimental Structural Dynamics Laboratory”. The objectives are to reinforce dynamicstructural analysis concepts relevant to engineers and to visualize that those analytical conceptssuch as natural frequencies and mode shapes exist in real structures through studentexperimentation. The basic notion that sets this laboratory apart from most existing laboratoriesis that the laboratory can be conducted with inexpensive equipment, such as a low capacity shaketable, a linear mass shaker, simple mobile data acquisition equipment and a limited number ofaccelerometers.A series of structural dynamics concepts are explored using physical models and real structures.Concepts explored include natural frequencies, mode shapes, damping, visualization of modalsuperposition, floor vibration, influence of foundation flexibility on the dynamic response, andthe influence of element buckling on the dynamic structural response. Comparison of theexperimental results is made to an analytical model for each of these concepts.The following topics are envisioned for the course: Introduction to laboratory measurements,ambient vibration, forced vibration, natural frequencies, mode shapes, damping and floorvibration in actual buildings, and effects of foundation stiffness and member buckling onbuilding dynamic response.The course will be evaluated and continually improved.

Laursen, P., & McDaniel, C. C., & Archer, G. C. (2015, June), Creating an Experimental Structural Dynamics Laboratory on a Shoe-string Budget Paper presented at 2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Seattle, Washington. 10.18260/p.23756

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