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Creating and Scaling an Evidence-based Faculty Development Program

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Conference

2018 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Publication Date

June 23, 2018

Start Date

June 23, 2018

End Date

July 27, 2018

Conference Session

Evidence-based Practices in Faculty Development

Tagged Topic

Faculty Development Constituency Committee

Page Count

14

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/30233

Download Count

30

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Paper Authors

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Casey Jane Ankeny Northwestern University

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Casey J. Ankeny, PhD is an Assistant Professor of Instruction at Northwestern University. Casey received her bachelor’s degree in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Virginia in 2006 and her doctorate degree in Biomedical Engineering from Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University in 2012 where she studied the role of shear stress in aortic valve disease. Currently, she is investigating cyber-based student engagement strategies in flipped and traditional biomedical engineering courses. She aspires to understand and improve student attitude, achievement, and persistence in student-centered courses.

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Lindy Hamilton Mayled Arizona State University

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Lindy Hamilton Mayled is a PhD candidate at Grand Canyon University. She is pursuing her PhD in Psychology of Learning, Education, and Technology. Her background in in K-12 education where she has served as a high school science teacher, Instructional and Curriculum Coach, and Assistant Principal. Her research and areas of interest are in improving STEM educational outcomes for Low-SES students through the integration of active learning and technology-enabled frequent feedback. She currently works as the Project Manager for the NSF faculty development program based on evidence-based teaching practices.

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Lydia Ross Arizona State University

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Lydia Ross is a doctoral candidate and graduate research assistant at Arizona State University. She is a third year student in the Educational Policy and Evaluation program. Her research interests focus on higher education equity and access, particularly within STEM.

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Keith D. Hjelmstad Arizona State University

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Keith D. Hjelmstad is Professor of Civil Engineering in the School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment at Arizona State University.

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Stephen J. Krause Arizona State University

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Stephen Krause is professor in the Materials Science Program in the Fulton Schools of Engineering at Arizona State University. He teaches in the areas of introductory materials engineering, polymers and composites, and capstone design. His research interests include faculty development, evaluating conceptual knowledge change, misconceptions, and technologies to promote conceptual change. He has co-developed a Materials Concept Inventory and a Chemistry Concept Inventory for assessing conceptual knowledge and change for introductory materials science and chemistry classes. He is currently conducting research on a large scale NSF faculty development project. His team is studying how workshops on strategies of engagement and feedback with support from internet tools and resources affect faculty beliefs, classroom practice, and development of disciplinary communities of practice and associated student achievement. He was a coauthor for the best paper award in the Journal of Engineering Education in 2013 and this year has received the Michael Ashby Outstanding Materials Educator Award from the Materials Division of ASEE.

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James A. Middleton Arizona State University

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James A. Middleton is Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Director of the Center for Research on Education in Science, Mathematics, Engineering, and Technology at Arizona State University. For the last three years he also held the Elmhurst Energy Chair in STEM education at the University of Birmingham in the UK. Previously, Dr. Middleton was Associate Dean for Research in the Mary Lou Fulton College of Education at Arizona State University, and Director of the Division of Curriculum and Instruction. He received his Ph.D. in Educational Psychology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1992, where he also served in the National Center for Research on Mathematical Sciences Education as a postdoctoral scholar.

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Robert J. Culbertson Arizona State University

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Robert J. Culbertson is an Associate Professor of Physics. Currently, he teaches introductory mechanics and electrodynamics for physics majors and a course in musical acoustics, which was specifically designed for elementary education majors. He is director of the ASU Physics Teacher Education Coalition (PhysTEC) Project, which strives to produce more and better high school physics teachers. He is also director of Master of Natural Science degree program, a graduate program designed for in-service science teachers. He works on improving persistence of students in STEM majors, especially under-prepared students and students from under-represented groups.

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Abstract

For more effective teaching and learning in undergraduate engineering education, there is a strong need for evidence-based faculty professional development to shift from instructor-centered teaching to student-centered, active learning, which is more effective (Freeman, et al., 2014). The NSF's Improving Undergraduate STEM Education (IUSE) program funded a large-scale faculty development program at a large, public university which uses a train-the-trainer approach, similar to Pimmel, et al., to engage faculty in a year-long modeling program with a semester of eight biweekly workshops, followed by a semester of six biweekly Community of Practice innovation discussions.

Here, we describe the creation, scaling, and evaluation of this evidence-based faculty development program. More specifically, we outline the benefits and barriers to faculty development; structure and management; strategies, topics, and materials; assessment; and lessons learned and takeaways in an interactive format.

In the “benefits and barriers” component, attendees will learn about foundational research by Prince, Freeman, Smith, and others in the area of engagement and active learning as well as learn about how the represented university addressed barriers to implementation. Attendees will discuss and brainstorm participation incentives from both the administrative and faculty perspectives. During “structure and management”, presenters will discuss the program overview in more detail, including recruitment, organization, and workshop and community of practice structure. Attendees will consider different types of faculty development options and think about implementation and structure in the context of a particular type of institution.

During the “strategies, topics, and materials” component, we will describe the project’s models of change, including Rogers’ model of Diffusion of Innovation and Coburn’s model of Sustainable Innovation Scaling. Presenters will also share all workshop materials by Google Drive on topics such as learning objectives, Bloom’s taxonomy, interactive classes, implementing active learning, cooperative learning, student motivation, and inclusive learning environments. Attendees will discuss topics that would be most important for faculty development at their institution.

In the “assessment” section, we will provide an overview of how we assessed our faculty development program in terms of the evaluation framework. We will discuss what the instruments measure and the outcomes from the instruments in our setting. Attendees will discuss other potential assessment techniques and how to implement. Throughout the presentation, facilitators will present key lessons learned from the project as well as important points about support and sustainability. In summary, participants will not only learn evidence-based strategies for the class but learn how to structure, implement, scale, and evaluate a faculty development program using lessons learned from a successful, large-scale example.

Ankeny, C. J., & Mayled, L. H., & Ross, L., & Hjelmstad, K. D., & Krause, S. J., & Middleton, J. A., & Culbertson, R. J. (2018, June), Creating and Scaling an Evidence-based Faculty Development Program Paper presented at 2018 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Salt Lake City, Utah. https://peer.asee.org/30233

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