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Cross-Disciplinary Biomedical Engineering Laboratories and Assessment of their Impact on Student Learning

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Conference

2011 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Vancouver, BC

Publication Date

June 26, 2011

Start Date

June 26, 2011

End Date

June 29, 2011

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Laboratories and Projects in BME

Tagged Division

Biomedical

Page Count

10

Page Numbers

22.404.1 - 22.404.10

DOI

10.18260/1-2--17685

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/17685

Download Count

93

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Paper Authors

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John D. Gassert Milwaukee School of Engineering

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John D. Gassert, Ph.D., P.E., is currently a Professor of Biomedical Engineering at the Milwaukee School of Engineering (MSOE) and an Adjunct Professor of Biophysics at the Medical College of Wisconsin. Gassert is a Registered Professional Engineer in the State of Wisconsin. He is currently the Chair of the Accreditation Activities Committee for BMES. He earned his Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering from Marquette University in 1995. He earned his M.S. degree and B.E. degree in Electrical Engineering in 1974 and 1971 respectively, both from Marquette University. Gassert is an AIMBE Fellow, a Senior Member of the IEEE, and a member in BMES and Sigma Xi. He is an ABET EAC program evaluator for Biomedical Engineering. He has developed and taught courses at both the graduate and undergraduate level in Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics, Perfusion, Electrical Engineering, Computer Engineering, and Electrical Engineering Technology. Prior to arriving at MSOE, Gassert spent seventeen years in industry in positions as a design engineer, a clinical engineer and a consultant. As part of his 17 years in industry, he owned his own engineering design and consulting company for eight years. He continues to operate his consulting and design business on a part-time basis.

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Jeffrey A. LaMack Milwaukee School of Engineering

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Olga Imas Milwaukee School of Engineering

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Olga Imas, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of biomedical engineering at the Milwaukee School of Engineering, where she teaches a variety of courses in biomedical digital signal processing, medical imaging, computing in biomedical engineering, biomaterials, anatomy and physiology. In addition to her academic responsibilities, she acts as a consultant to GE Healthcare for product development with emphasis on advanced imaging applications for neurology, cardiology, and oncology. Olga’s technical areas of expertise include signal and imaging processing, and statistical analysis. In her previous and current product development roles, Olga gained extensive experience in clinical product management involving market analysis for new and existing imaging products, and clinical product marketing. She has experience in managing product evaluations at multiple clinical sites, and has a comprehensive knowledge of neurology, oncology, and cardiology imaging markets. She has established a number of strong collaborations with clinical experts in recognized neuroimaging and oncology centers.

Olga has earned her undergraduate degree in biomedical engineering from the Milwaukee School of Engineering in 1999, and a doctorate degree in biomedical engineering and functional imaging from the Joint Functional Imaging program at Marquette University and Medical College of Wisconsin in 2004. Prior to entering academia full-time in 2009, Olga completed a three-year postdoctoral fellowship in anesthesiology at the Medical College of Wisconsin, where she studied the effects of general anesthetic agents on brain function. She then worked at GE Healthcare as a product development specialist in CT and Molecular Imaging with emphasis on post-processing software applications for neurology, oncology, and cardiology. Olga has over twenty peer-reviewed publications, and three pending patents. Her professional interests include physiological mechanisms of Alzheimer’s disease, anesthetic ablation of consciousness, and applicability of medical imaging in stroke and brain trauma.

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Larry Fennigkoh Milwaukee School of Engineering

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NE Schlick Milwaukee School of Engineering

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Charles S. Tritt Milwaukee School of Engineering

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Dr. Tritt is an Associate Professor and the director of the Biomedical Engineering program at the Milwaukee School of Engineering. His professional interests include biomedical applications of mass, heat and momentum transfer; biomaterials, medical device and process modeling; medical device design; the FDA Quality System (also known as the current GMP) regulation (particularly design controls); and entrepreneurship.

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Ron Gerrits Milwaukee School of Engineering

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Ron J. Gerrits, Ph.D., is currently an Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering, and Academic Program Director of the Master's of Science in Perfusion program at the Milwaukee School of Engineering. He holds a B.S. in Biomedical Engineering from the Milwaukee School of Engineering (1994) and a Ph.D. in Physiology from the Medical College of Wisconsin (1999). He most commonly teaches health science courses for nursing, perfusion and biomedical engineering students. Professional interests focus on science education and he currently serves as the chairperson of the Curriculum and Instruction Committee of the Human Anatomy and Physiology Society and is active in an NSF funded Biology Scholars program

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Abstract

Cross-Disciplinary Biomedical Engineering Laboratories and Assessment of their Impact on Student LearningAbstract:Three cross-disciplinary team-based laboratory courses were introduced into a biomedicalengineering curriculum to enhance student understanding of the interdependence of theengineering topics and biomedical science. The three cross-disciplinary laboratories include thefollowing: 1. Physiology/Biosystems--students use concepts learned in signals and systems and apply them to physiologically relevant systems 2. Physiology/Biotransport--students apply concepts in fluid mechanics and biophysical transport to physiological systems 3. Biomechanics/Biomaterials--students apply concepts learned in statics, dynamics, strength of materials, chemistry, statistics and biological systems to analyze and evaluate medical devicesA major challenge for the faculty is the assessment of student understanding and retention of thematerials and judging if there has been an improvement as a result in the change in thecurriculum i.e. was the curriculum effective? The method chosen was to, wherever possible,employ previously developed concept inventory assessment tools, assess students from both theprior and the new curriculum, and draw inference from the results. It is expected that theconcept inventory assessment tools will provide a reasonable assessment of the students’ abilityto apply the concepts introduced in the new laboratory exercises. Students from curricula withand without the cross-disciplinary labs will be tested to compare their integrated understandingof engineering and life science topics.At the beginning of the fall term in 2010, an assessment exam was taken by senior BME studentsfrom a curriculum that did not include cross-disciplinary laboratories. A subsequent conceptassessment exam will be administered to BME students who have completed the cross-disciplinary laboratory classes. The results will be analyzed using appropriate statistical tests todetermine if there was a change in the students’ skills as a result of the experience. The facultyexpects to see statistically significant increases in student ability to solve multi-disciplinaryproblems, as well as problems within the realms of the individual disciplines.

Gassert, J. D., & LaMack, J. A., & Imas, O., & Fennigkoh, L., & Schlick, N., & Tritt, C. S., & Gerrits, R. (2011, June), Cross-Disciplinary Biomedical Engineering Laboratories and Assessment of their Impact on Student Learning Paper presented at 2011 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Vancouver, BC. 10.18260/1-2--17685

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