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Curriculum Analysis Of Industrial Technology, Engineering Technology And Engineering Manufacturing Programs In A Single Educational Environment

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Conference

2007 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Honolulu, Hawaii

Publication Date

June 24, 2007

Start Date

June 24, 2007

End Date

June 27, 2007

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Technology Integration in the Classroom for Manufacturing I

Tagged Division

Manufacturing

Page Count

9

Page Numbers

12.434.1 - 12.434.9

DOI

10.18260/1-2--2059

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/2059

Download Count

20

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Paper Authors

author page

Mohamed Gadalla Texas State University - San Marcus

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Curriculum Analysis of Industrial Technology, Engineering Technology and Engineering Manufacturing Programs in Single Educational Environment.

Dr. Mohamed A. Gadalla Texas State University Department of Engineering and Technology 601 University Dr. San Marcos, TX 78666

Abstract

This paper provides an in-depth analysis to develop (or refine) manufacturing curriculum of an Industrial Technology, Engineering Technology and Manufacturing Engineering Programs when they exist in single educational environment. A single educational environment can be defined as a department(s), school(s), or colleges(s). Such an arrangement provides an opportunity where the engineering and technology curriculum blend to offer the students a wide range of experience and knowledge. In addition, it provides the local communities and industry with integrated workforce that has a high diversity of engineering and technology skills. This paper is intended to discuss guidelines, strategies to enable efficient design, development, and implementation of these programs. It also addresses the common curriculum mistakes that may decrease the efficiency of these programs. Introduction

There is an increasing trend among many of the higher education institutes to have an Industrial Technology (IT), Engineering Technology (ET), and engineering undergraduate majors offered in a single department, college, or across multiple colleges. This paper is intended to discuss a set of guidelines and strategies to enable efficient design, development, and implementation of these programs. These guidelines are intended to create a cooperative and integrated educational environment where these programs are operated.

A common mistake found in the designing of these programs; the curriculum sheet associated with each program is created by taking a subset from a larger number of courses that are being offered. The proposed design in this paper is based on developing an educational information model and a course structure layout for each program major prior choosing the courses. It is believed that following this approach, should result in a better program design.

Program Design

Undergraduate engineering and technology programs can be designed based on three main educational constituents [1, 2]. These are: Engineering Science, Engineering and Technology Applications, and Hands-on type of Experience. Figure 1 shows a pie chart that could be used as an information model to determine the size of each constituent. For example, in an Engineering program the amount of science should represent the biggest sector of the pie, while in an industrial technology program it is the hands-on.

Gadalla, M. (2007, June), Curriculum Analysis Of Industrial Technology, Engineering Technology And Engineering Manufacturing Programs In A Single Educational Environment Paper presented at 2007 Annual Conference & Exposition, Honolulu, Hawaii. 10.18260/1-2--2059

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