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Defining the Core Body of Knowledge (CorBoK) for a Graduate Program in Systems Engineering: A Work in Progress

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Conference

2012 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

San Antonio, Texas

Publication Date

June 10, 2012

Start Date

June 10, 2012

End Date

June 13, 2012

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Systems Engineering Curriculum and Programs

Tagged Divisions

Engineering Management, Systems Engineering, and Industrial Engineering

Page Count

18

Page Numbers

25.382.1 - 25.382.18

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/21140

Download Count

40

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Paper Authors

biography

Alice F. Squires Stevens Institute of Technology

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Alice Squires is Manager of Systems Engineering at Aurora Flight Sciences and an adjunct systems engineering faculty for the School of Systems and Enterprises at Stevens Institute of Technology. She is one of many authors on the Systems Engineering Body of Knowledge (http://www.sebokwiki.org/) and the Graduate Curriculum for Systems Engineering (http://bkcase.org/grcse-05). She was previously a Senior Researcher for the Systems Engineering University Affiliated Research Center (SE UARC) and Online Technical Director for the School of Systems and Enterprises. She has served as a Senior Systems Engineer consultant to Lockheed Martin, IBM, and EDO Ceramics, for Advanced Systems Supportability Engineering Technology and Tools (ASSETT), Inc. Squires also previously served as a Senior Engineering Manager for General Dynamics (GD) and Lockheed Martin (LM), and as a technical lead for IBM. She is an INCOSE-certified CSEP and CSEP-Acq, and she has a Ph.D. in dystems engineering, a M.B.A. and a B.S.E.E. and began her professional career as an analyst for Delex Systems, Inc. Squires is a lifetime member of Beta Gamma Sigma (business), Tau Beta Pi (national engineering), and Eta Kappa Nu (national electrical engineering) honorary societies and is a member of ASEE, IEEE, NDIA, and INCOSE and Past Chair of the ASEE Systems Engineering Division. Squires received the Stevens Institute of Technology Provost’s Online Teaching Excellence Award in 2007; the General Dynamics Technical Achievement in Safety Award in 2002; the Lockheed Martin Outstanding Team Award in 1998; and multiple technical awards from IBM from 1986 to 1993. Her research interests include engineering education, distance education, workforce competency development, and systems thinking.

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Timothy L.J. Ferris University of South Australia

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Tim Ferris holds B.E. (hons.), Adelaide, BTh, Flinders, BLittHons, Deakin, GradCertEd, QUT, Ph.D., South Australia. He has worked at the University of South Australia for 21 years and is responsible for the teaching activities of the Defence and Systems Institute. He is the Associate Director Academic Research in INCOSE and is the lead author of the Graduate Reference Curriculum for Systems Engineering, GRCSE. His research interests are in the nature of systems engineering, research methods for engineering, cross-cultural issues in engineering practice, and engineering education.

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Joseph J. Ekstrom Brigham Young University

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Joseph Ekstrom spent 30 years in systems/software development as an engineer and manager. He is currently the Program Chair of the Information Technology program at Brigham Young University. His research interests include network and systems management, distributed computing, system modeling and architecture, system development, cybersecurity, and curriculum development.

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biography

Mary D. VanLeer Perceptive-Systems

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Mary. VanLeer has more 30 years experience in defining, designing, and supporting IT solutions for high-end data center environments. She has held the positions of Director, Serviceability, Software Engineering, at Sun Microsystems, Director of Engineering Operations at International Game Technology, and Director of Information Technology at the Arkansas Lottery Commission. In those positions, VanLeer introduced new verification methods to test the robustness of the products' system recovery capabilities and led numerous initiatives in the quality efforts for diagnosability, serviceability, and fault management, led an initiative to understand and build the engineering capabilities focusing on systems engineering, and built the internal IT infrastructure for Arkansas’s new state lottery. As a member of the International Council on Systems Engineering, VanLeer advocates an agile systems engineering set of disciplines without sacrificing the innovation style of today's engineers.

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Garry Roedler Lockheed Martin

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Garry Roedler’s systems engineering career at LM spans the full system life cycle and includes technical leadership roles in both programs and systems engineering business functions. As a LM Fellow and the corporate Engineering Outreach Program Manager, Roedler is responsible for executing an external outreach strategy for LM leadership, influence, and leverage of technical industry associations. Prior roles include: Senior SE Program Manager, managing corporate councils for SE, Test & Evaluation, and Specialty Engineering focused on engineering practices, training, and improvement; Process Manager in IS&GS, responsible for strategic planning of technology needs, process technology development/infusion, and process definition/improvement; this included achievement/sustainment of Level 5 SE-CMM/CMMI objectives; Technical leadership roles on programs/proposals, Technical Lead for system installation/demonstration/deployment, Customer Liaison, and System Analysis Manager; and mathematics instructor, secondary/college level. Roedler holds degrees in mathematics education and mechanical engineering from Temple University and the Expert Systems Engineering Professional (ESEP) certification from INCOSE. Roedler has numerous publications and presentations, and is the recipient of many awards, including the INCOSE Founders Award, Best SE Journal Article, and IEEE Golden Core. His leadership roles across many technical organizations include editor of ISO/IEC/IEEE 15288, Systems Life Cycle Processes, and several other standards.

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Abstract

Defining the Core Body of Knowledge (CorBoK) for a Graduate Program in Systems Engineering: A Work in ProgressAbstractAs  part  of  the  Body  of  Knowledge  and  Curriculum  to  Advance  Systems  Engineering  (BKCASE™)  project, a Graduate Reference Curriculum for Systems Engineering (GRCSE™)  is  being  developed  to  assist  in  the  improvement  of  existing  or  development  of  new  graduate  programs  in  systems  engineering.  The  goal  of  GRCSE  is  to  provide  a  curriculum  framework  to  institutions  for  both  developing  and  communicating  their  system  engineering  graduate  program  content  so  that  there  is  a  more  common  understanding  of  the  content  that  is  addressed  within  the  programs  and  more  consistency  across  the  programs.    Yet  the  framework  is  also  designed  so  that  institutions  can  preserve  their  unique  specialties  and  university-­‐specific  requirements.  One of the many challenges in defining GRCSE has beenidentifying a feasible approach for defining the core body of systems engineering knowledge thatevery graduate student should be exposed to prior to graduating from the program. GRCSE  defines  this  core  body  of  knowledge  (CorBoK)  as  the  set  of  core  topics  recommended  for  inclusion  in  every  professional  Masters  program;  with  the  intent  that  mastery  of  the  content  of  these  core  topics  is  required  of  all  graduates.  The  CorBoK  is  comprised  of  two  parts:  1)  the  truly  common  part:  the  core  foundation  to  be  learned  by  everyone  who  goes  through  a  master’s  program,  and  2)  a  core  concentration  that  favors  one  of  several  emphases.  An  institution  can  choose  to  implement  one  or  more  of  the  concentration  areas.  The  idea  is  that  a  student  would  select  an  available  concentration  area  and  learn  the  corresponding  extension  of  core  knowledge  in  that  area,  in  addition  to  the  knowledge  in  the  core  foundation,  as  part  of  the  CorBoK  of  the  program.  GRCSE  intentionally  limits  the  CorBoK  to  no  more  than  50%  of  the  total  knowledge  conveyed  in  a  graduate  systems  engineering  program  in  order  to  encourage  and  enable  wide  variation  across  institutions  and  to  accommodate  unique  emphases  in  other  areas.  This  paper  describes  the  approach  used  to  define  the  CorBoK  in  the  version  0.5  draft  of  GRCSE  released  in  December  2011;  the  challenges  associated  with  developing  the  approach;  and  the  strengths  and  weaknesses  of  the  approach.    The  paper  then  describes  considerations  and  future  plans  under  development  for  defining  the  final  CorBoK  for  the  version  1.0  release  of  the  GRCSE  scheduled  for  public  release  in  December  2012.  

Squires, A. F., & Ferris, T. L., & Ekstrom, J. J., & VanLeer, M. D., & Roedler, G. (2012, June), Defining the Core Body of Knowledge (CorBoK) for a Graduate Program in Systems Engineering: A Work in Progress Paper presented at 2012 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, San Antonio, Texas. https://peer.asee.org/21140

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