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Demonstrating Complex Communication Systems Principles Using Electronic Courseware And A Simple Computer Math Package

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Conference

1998 Annual Conference

Location

Seattle, Washington

Publication Date

June 28, 1998

Start Date

June 28, 1998

End Date

July 1, 1998

ISSN

2153-5965

Page Count

6

Page Numbers

3.184.1 - 3.184.6

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/7012

Download Count

20

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Paper Authors

author page

Thomas F. Schubert Jr.

author page

Kathleen A. Kramer

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 1532

Demonstrating Complex Communication Systems Principles Using Electronic Courseware and a Simple Computer Math Package Kathleen A. Kramer and Thomas F. Schubert, Jr. University of San Diego

Abstract

While computer simulation can be used to augment student understanding of complex systems and signals principles, knowledge of computer package specifics can form a major barrier to student understanding. A series of five electronic courseware modules for use in a senior-level communication systems course are described. The modules are designed to provide interactive step-by-step guidance to students performing system simulations using a mathematical simulation package. The system simulations are designed and run from within the courseware modules. Five such modules are described. Among the communication systems topics investigated in the exercises are quantization noise, distortion, companding, and Nyquist's criteria for zero intersymbol interference.

Introduction

In the study of communication systems, it is often difficult for students to develop a true understanding of the more complex systems and signal principles without exercising an appropriate communication system. However, the complexity of and costs associated with appropriate commercial or instructional communication hardware systems make such systems, in many cases, unattractive in a university setting. Computer simulation is often a more appropriate solution to augmenting student learning in the area of communications systems. A mathematical computation package, such as Mathcad, provides a suitable platform for the development of such simulation exercises. One drawback to this approach is the difficulty experienced by students not adept in use of the particular computer package.

Student knowledge of computer package specifics can be bypassed through the use of electronic courseware modules. A series of such original courseware modules has been developed at the University of San Diego. Among the communication systems topics investigated in the exercises are quantization noise, distortion, companding, and Nyquist's criteria for zero intersymbol interference. These modules, which make use of interactive multimedia presentation techniques, can be used by the students within a computer laboratory, or be made available as web pages that are internet-accessible. The exercises are appropriate for use as student laboratory exercises, as a supplement to hardware laboratory exercises, or as outside assignments for courses that do not have a laboratory component. One significant advantage of these modules is that they allow most of the student's effort to be devoted to understanding of communications systems rather than usage of a particular mathematical computation package. Another advantage is that the modules can be made available to the student without an extensive commitment of laboratory facilities. The paper describes courseware modules for the simulation exercises, and reports on the use of these exercises in a university setting to augment a course in communication system principles.

Schubert Jr., T. F., & Kramer, K. A. (1998, June), Demonstrating Complex Communication Systems Principles Using Electronic Courseware And A Simple Computer Math Package Paper presented at 1998 Annual Conference, Seattle, Washington. https://peer.asee.org/7012

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