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Design And Implementation Of An Undergraduate Computational Fluid Dynamics (Cfd) Course

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Conference

2003 Annual Conference

Location

Nashville, Tennessee

Publication Date

June 22, 2003

Start Date

June 22, 2003

End Date

June 25, 2003

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Trends in Mechanical Engineering

Page Count

8

Page Numbers

8.367.1 - 8.367.8

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/12167

Download Count

532

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Paper Authors

author page

Kendrick Aung

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 1566

Design and Implementation of An Undergraduate Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Course

Kyaw Aung

Department of Mechanical Engineering Lamar University, Beaumont, Texas 77710

Abstract

With ever increasing advances in the computers and their computing power, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has become an essential tool in the design and analysis of engineering applications. Thus, many universities have developed and implemented a course on CFD for undergraduate and graduate engineering students. This paper presents the design and implementation of an undergraduate Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) course in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Lamar University. The paper describes the course objectives, textbook and reference materials, detailed contents and topics of the course, and group projects to be solved by the commercial CFD software. The results from the survey of students on the use of commercial CFX software are also provided.

Introduction

Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is the art of replacing the integrals or the partial derivatives in fundamental governing equations of fluid dynamics with discretized algebraic forms, which in turn are solved to obtain numbers for the flowfield values at discrete points in time and/or space1. With rapid advent of the computers and their computing power, CFD has become an essential tool in the design and analysis of engineering applications. For example, the design of a new industrial burner can be completely done using a CFD software before a prototype is built. Increasing use of CFD as a design and analysis tool in different industries such as chemical processing, oil drilling, biotechnology, and energy generation help educators realize the need for incorporating CFD in the curriculum of undergraduate engineering education. Thus, more and more universities have developed and implemented a course on CFD for undergraduate and graduate engineering students, especially for aerospace and mechanical engineering disciplines2, 3, 4, 5. For example, the CFD course at Kettering University was implemented to introduce undergraduate to new technology used in industry and to meet the needs recommended by industry. The faculty members of the mechanical engineering department at Lamar University have therefore decided to incorporate CFD into the fluid curriculum for the benefits of undergraduate and graduate students.

Proceedings of the 2003 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright  2003, American Society for Engineering Education

Aung, K. (2003, June), Design And Implementation Of An Undergraduate Computational Fluid Dynamics (Cfd) Course Paper presented at 2003 Annual Conference, Nashville, Tennessee. https://peer.asee.org/12167

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