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Design Course for First-Year Students in Multiple Engineering Disciplines

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Conference

2018 ASEE Zone IV Conference

Location

Boulder, Colorado

Publication Date

March 25, 2018

Start Date

March 25, 2018

End Date

March 27, 2018

Page Count

8

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/29605

Download Count

40

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Paper Authors

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Mark Todd Gordon California Baptist University

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Dr. Mark T Gordon is an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Bioengineering in the Gordon and Jill Bourns College of Engineering at California Baptist University. Dr. Gordon earned his BSE from Calvin College and his MS and PhD from the University of Michigan in mechanical engineering.

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Seunghyun Chun California Baptist University

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Dr. Chun is currently an Associate Professor at the California Baptist University, Gordon and Jill Bourns College of Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department. His area of interest is in power electronics, smartgrid and engineering education.

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Xueyan Sarah Zhao California Baptist University

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Michael Jean-Claude Nalbandian California Baptist University

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Dr. Nalbandian is currently an Assistant Professor at the California Baptist University, Gordon and Jill Bourns College of Engineering Civil Engineering and Construction Management department. His area of interest is in environmental aquatic chemistry, as well as environmental applications of nanotechnology.

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Mi Kyung Han California Baptist University

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Dr. Mi Kyung Han received her M.S. and Ph.D. in Computer Science with an emphasis in Wireless and Mobile Networks from The University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin) in 2011. After graduation, Dr. Han worked at Microsoft till 2015 as a software engineer in SQL Server Business Intelligence team and Power BI Cloud Services team. She has designed and developed various back-end cloud services for Power BI (www.powerbi.com), and worked on Power BI integration with Office 365, and PowerPivot (in-memory BI) integration with SharePoint. Since the fall of 2015, she joined California Baptist University (CBU) as an assistant professor in Computer Science department. Her research interests include mobile and wireless networks, Internet of Things (IoT), cloud services, business intelligence, and big data.

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Mario Oyanader California Baptist University

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Dr. Oyanader earned his B.S. in Civil and Chemical Engineering from Northern Catholic University in Antofagasta-Chile in 1989; his M.S. in Information Systems from Hawaii Pacific University in 1994; and his Ph.D. in Environmental Engineering from Florida State University in 2004.

Dr. Oyanader joined the College of Engineering at California Baptist University in the fall of 2014 where he is currently an Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering. In the three years prior, he was an Associate Professor of the Department of Engineering and Computer Science at Geneva College in Beaver Falls, PA. From 2007 to 2011, he performed as the Unit Operation Lab Director and Chemical Engineering Program Coordinator at Tennessee Technological University in Cookeville, TN. Between 1996 and 2007, and Dr. Oyanader transitioned from Assistant Professor to Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering at Northern Catholic University in Antofagasta-Chile. He was Department Head for the Chemical Engineering Department at Northern Catholic University from 1998 to 2000. Within the chemical engineering discipline, Dr. Oyanader has taught several topics including Fluid Mechanics, Transport Phenomena, Thermodynamics, Unit Operations, Chemical Process Design, Process Simulation & Control, and Design of Experiment. His teaching of these subjects has been driven by the use of methodologies such as Active learning with Student Response Systems, Key Competencies Teaching, and One-On-One and Peer Training.

Dr. Oyanader has three main research interest focus areas: a) Applied Environmental Engineering, b) Electro-Bio-molecular Treatment and Separation, and c) Computational and Modeling Approach in Physicochemical Processes. His approach is based on the use of fundamental principles to explore solutions to a wide range of practical problems that includes effluent treatment, water decontamination, desalinization, drug delivery and the design of medical devices.

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Abstract

First year engineering courses are shared at many schools complicating first-year design courses. This paper addresses the issues of incorporating multiple engineering majors into a first-year design course while teaching a design process that is applicable to all majors.

The project in this course is a sorting task that requires teams to compete against each other by taking objects from the middle of the arena to their end and sort them according to their characteristics. Students complete the task using three distinct units. The acquisition unit removes the objects from the starting bin and transfers the objects to the transportation unit. The transportation unit transports the objects to the team’s end of the arena and transfers them to the sorting unit. The sorting unit sorts the objects according to their characteristics (size, shape, and material) and deposits them into the final bins. The team score is based on both the quantity and the purity of the objects sorted.

The design process used in this class is based on the materials published by Alexander Slocum on MIT Open Courseware. The process is to develop an overall strategy to accomplish the task before breaking it down into concepts, modules, and finally components. Students start by developing and discussing at least three different ideas for strategies. Next, they choose a strategy and come up with three different concepts to execute the strategy. Finally, the students divide concept into modules and create three different designs for each module. This layered approach requires the students to slow down and evaluate their options rather than building the first design they think of which has little focus on design. A series of milestones are used as assessments to walk the students through the design process as well as design iterations throughout the semester.

The project attempts to cover all of the engineering fields at a rudimentary level. The sorting unit has a structure that often moves, is programmed, utilizes an EMG input, uses a blower, and separates objects by their characteristics to support civil, mechanical, software, biomedical, and chemical engineering. The transportation unit typically includes a drive train, a structure, and requires soldering to support mechanical engineering, civil engineering, and electrical engineering. The acquisition unit again includes a structure that moves and is programed supporting civil, mechanical, and software engineering. The entire project involves systems and project management to support industrial and systems engineering and construction management.

Students (n = 56) took a survey using a Likert scale to assess if they learned about the design process and about various engineering degrees. Students indicated that they learned the design process (4.2) but had a less positive response about the the different majors (3.5). Students indicated that the least understood majors were chemical engineering (2.4) and biomedical engineering (2.9).

This course is constructed to have students learn a thorough design process while exposing them to the different engineering disciplines. This will help lay a strong foundation for future design projects as well as aiding students in deciding which engineering discipline they should pursue.

Gordon, M. T., & Chun, S., & Zhao, X. S., & Nalbandian, M. J., & Han, M. K., & Oyanader, M. (2018, March), Design Course for First-Year Students in Multiple Engineering Disciplines Paper presented at 2018 ASEE Zone IV Conference, Boulder, Colorado. https://peer.asee.org/29605

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