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Design Of The Learning Environment : Professional Project Based Learning In Construction Education

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Conference

1998 Annual Conference

Location

Seattle, Washington

Publication Date

June 28, 1998

Start Date

June 28, 1998

End Date

July 1, 1998

ISSN

2153-5965

Page Count

5

Page Numbers

3.189.1 - 3.189.5

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/7019

Download Count

60

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Paper Authors

author page

Erdogan Sener

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 1221

Design of the Learning Environment : Professional-project- Based Learning in Construction Education Erdogan M. Sener Indiana University – Purdue University Indianapolis

Abstract With increased emphasis on the end result of student learning rather than on the process of teaching/instruction, the design of the learning environment has become a major task for faculty. For engineering and technology curricula not only should this environment include involvement of students in simplified versions of their professional practice but also emphasize both the continuity of knowledge in a curriculum as well as the importance of using and retaining competency acquired in all courses. This paper focuses on three undertakings in construction technology education that has the above objectives in their design and implementation.

Introduction The new movement in higher education is an ever-increasing emphasis on assessment of the outcomes of the education process. As a result the focus is on the end result of student learning rather than on the process of teaching/instruction. This in itself has made the design of the learning environment become the major task for faculty in all disciplines. For engineering and technology curricula not only should this environment include involvement of students in simplified versions of their professional practice in a teamwork format but also emphasize both the continuity of knowledge in a curriculum as well as the importance of using and retaining competency acquired in all courses

The Need/Problem A serious deficiency common to all textbooks used in design, analysis, and problem-solving courses in engineering technology programs is the isolated nature of problems contained in each chapter. These problems, in general, stress the concepts and techniques covered in that chapter without really striving to establish a continuity with the previous chapters. The implicit assumption is that the students will be able to bridge the gap between the chapters and grasp the continuity of context, see the overall picture, and perceive where they are headed. According to my experience, however, this does not necessarily happen without special effort on the part of the faculty member. My class work and exams are designed to make the student aware of how each chapter builds up on the previous ones and that an understanding of the big picture is expected at the end. Still, I have often found ascertaining of mastery of competencies expected to be difficult within the inevitable limitations of examination/quiz duration and context. I have tried to make up for the deficiencies of the examinations in this respect in terms of semester projects that entail a wider scope. Nevertheless, the scopes of these assignments, in my opinion, were still limited in terms of what will be expected of our students in their future careers. Another problem along the same line is that the students are not always cognizant of the continuity between classes. More often than not, students accept taking a course as an end in

Sener, E. (1998, June), Design Of The Learning Environment : Professional Project Based Learning In Construction Education Paper presented at 1998 Annual Conference, Seattle, Washington. https://peer.asee.org/7019

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