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Designing An Effective Distance Course Using A Synchronous And Hybrid E Learning Approach

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Conference

2009 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Austin, Texas

Publication Date

June 14, 2009

Start Date

June 14, 2009

End Date

June 17, 2009

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Develop Course / Materials / Topics for a Global Engineering Education

Tagged Division

International

Page Count

8

Page Numbers

14.427.1 - 14.427.8

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/5746

Download Count

26

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Paper Authors

biography

Asad Azemi Pennsylvania State University

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Asad Azemi is an associate professor of Engineering at Penn State University. He has received his B.S. degree from UCLA in 1982, M.S. degree from Loyola Marymount University in 1985, and Ph.D. degree from University of Arkansas in 1991. His professional interests are in nonlinear stochastic systems, signal estimation, decision making under uncertainty, biocomputing, and use of computers and related technologies in undergraduate and graduate education to improve and enhance teaching and learning.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Designing an effective distance course using a synchronous hybrid e-learning approach

Abstract

The usefulness of hybrid delivery in education has long been realized and with the advancement of computer and communication technologies and the introduction of Web based authoring tools, its effectiveness has been further extended. In this regard, it has affected the traditional distance learning by transforming it from a static videotape delivery to a more dynamic format by adding or substituting the web as the delivery media. Our focus in this paper is the use of hybrid e- learning with virtual face-to-face for a distance course delivery. We believe that hybrid e- learning in conjunction with a synchronous online delivery can minimize the negatives that are sometimes associated with more traditional, primarily asynchronous distance learning offerings. Details of this work, including design and delivery issues, student and course assessment, and required technology are included in this paper.

Introduction

Clearly the advancement and affordability of computer and communication technologies during the past decade, especially the rapid growth and usage of the Internet, has had major effects on our everyday lives. Online learning offers the prospect of direct delivery of learning to existing learners and to groups traditionally excluded by personal circumstances from institutional learning 1-5. In this regard, it has affected the traditional distance learning format by transforming it from a static videotape delivery to a more dynamic format by adding or substituting the web as the delivery media. A variety of socio-economic and technological factors are responsible for the increased demand for distance education. Now, more than any other time in the past, educational institutions are using non-traditional and more technological approaches to reach a wider audience1-5. The benefits of using distance learning have been long realized and reported. Some of these benefits include: the opportunity to take courses without having to physically travel to the instructor's location, the ability to take courses in one’s area of interest, and, depending on the program rules and guidelines, the capability to complete a customized degree using credits from several universities. In this work we present hybrid e- learning with a virtual face-to-face methodology that we have used for distance delivery of graduate level electrical engineering courses. It should be noted that among the recent published studies in this area, some define hybrid learning as a combination of “face-to-face” and “asynchronous” 6-10 and some, like ours, as “synchronous” and “asynchronous” 11-12, where the synchronous part is a “face-to-face” or virtual face-to-face. This methodology is a special case of common hybrid delivery, where technology plays a more significant role, and at the same time, it is more difficult to plan and administer. Based on our experience the adopted methodology has a direct correlation with the level, undergraduate or graduate, and the subject matter. This paper is organized as follows: (i) a brief introduction of hybrid delivery model, (ii)

Azemi, A. (2009, June), Designing An Effective Distance Course Using A Synchronous And Hybrid E Learning Approach Paper presented at 2009 Annual Conference & Exposition, Austin, Texas. https://peer.asee.org/5746

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