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Developing a Faculty Learning Community to Support Writing across Different STEM Disciplines

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Conference

2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Columbus, Ohio

Publication Date

June 24, 2017

Start Date

June 24, 2017

End Date

June 28, 2017

Conference Session

Writing and Communication

Tagged Division

Liberal Education/Engineering & Society

Page Count

11

DOI

10.18260/1-2--28130

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/28130

Download Count

378

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Paper Authors

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Vukica M. Jovanovic Old Dominion University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-8626-903X

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Dr. Vukica Jovanovic is an Assistant Professor of Engineering Technology in Mechanical Engineering Technology Program. She holds a Ph.D. from Purdue University in Mechanical Engineering Technology, focus on Digital Manufacturing. Her research is focused on mechatronics, digital manufacturing, digital thread, cyber physical systems, broadening participation, and engineering education. She is a Co-Director of Mechatronics and Digital Manufacturing Lab at ODU and a lead of Area of Specialization Mechatronics Systems Design. She worked as a Visiting Researcher at Commonwealth Center for Advanced Manufacturing in Disputanta, VA on projects focusing on digital thread and cyber security of manufacturing systems. She has funded research in broadening participation efforts of underrepresented students in STEM funded by Office of Naval Research, focusing on mechatronic pathways. She is part of the ONR project related to the additive manufacturing training of active military. She is also part of the research team that leads the summer camp to nine graders that focus on broadening participation of underrepresented students into STEM (ODU BLAST).

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Denise Tombolato-Terzic Christopher Newport University

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Born and raised in Brazil, Denise Tombolato-Terzic earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Agronomical Engineering at her prestigious alma mater "ESALQ", University of São Paulo's agricultural campus. She completed her graduate work at the University of Florida, having pursued Master's and PhD degrees in Plant Pathology and Molecular Biology, respectively. After a brief time in industry, Dr. Tombolato-Terzic returned to academia, seeking a Master's degree in Bioinformatics at Northern Illinois University. Currently, Dr. Tombolato-Terzic is a lecturer at the Molecular Biology and Chemistry department at Christopher Newport University. She teaches laboratory courses, lectures, scientific literacy, scientific writing and how to deliver oral presentations.

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Daniel P. Richards Old Dominion University

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Daniel Richards, Ph.D. is assistant professor of technical and professional writing in the Department of English at Old Dominion University. His research interests include writing pedagogy, rhetorical theory, and technical communication in disasters.

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Pilar Pazos Old Dominion University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-4348-7798

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Pilar Pazos is an Associate Professor in the Department of Engineering Management and Systems Engineering at Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA, USA. Her main areas of research interest are collaborative work structures, virtual teams and team decision-making and performance.

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Megan McKittrick Old Dominion University

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Megan McKittrick is a Lecturer and PhD candidate in the Department of English at Old Dominion University. She teaches composition, scientific, digital, and technical writing, and her research interests include technical communication and game studies.

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Julia Romberger Old Dominion University

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Julia Romberger is an Associate Professor of Professional Writing at Old Dominion
University. Her research interests include pedagogical practices, visual rhetoric, and the rhetoric of interface design. She teaches courses at the undergraduate and graduate level in business writing, technical writing, writing for the web, visual rhetoric, and has mentored business and professional writing teaching staff. She has published on undergraduate and graduate pedagogy, cultural implications of interface design, and methodology.

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Otilia Popescu Old Dominion University

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Dr. Otilia Popescu received the Engineering Diploma and M.S. degree from the Polytechnic Institute of Bucharest, Romania, and the PhD degree from Rutgers University, all in Electrical and Computer Engineering. Her research interests are in the general areas of communication systems, control theory, and signal processing. She is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Engineering Technology, Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia. In the past she has worked for the University of Texas at Dallas, University of Texas at San Antonio, Rutgers University, and Politehnica University of Bucharest. She is a senior member of the IEEE, serves as associate editor for IEEE Communication Letters, and has served in the technical program committee for the IEEE ICC, WCNC, RWW, VTC, GLOBECOM, and CAMAD conferences.

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Abstract

Writing to learn is one of the very important pedagogical strategies in a variety of disciplines. This concept is not specifically addressed in the majority of engineering courses. Hence, university initiatives such as Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP), emerging out of accreditation and institutional assessments, are focusing on infusing scholarship from other disciplines (in this case English) for the purpose of student learning improvement. Engineering and Science programs do include various courses in English Composition as the part of the curriculum; however, writing is not embedded in all discipline-specific courses at the upper-division level. The program outlined here focuses on the exploration of possible methods for engineering and science faculty to embed more writing assignments in their STEM courses so that undergraduate students can adequately transfer what they learned from English courses and apply it in their specific discipline once they attain higher proficiency (at the junior and senior level). The project presented in this paper included the creation of a Faculty Learning Community (FLC) composed of English, Engineering, and Science scholars, with the goal of developing writing assignments that enhance student learning while also building off of writing concepts students learn in introductory writing courses. This paper evaluates the effect of the FLC on student learning and on faculty professional development.

Jovanovic, V. M., & Tombolato-Terzic, D., & Richards, D. P., & Pazos, P., & McKittrick, M., & Romberger, J., & Popescu, O. (2017, June), Developing a Faculty Learning Community to Support Writing across Different STEM Disciplines Paper presented at 2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Columbus, Ohio. 10.18260/1-2--28130

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2017 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015