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Developing and Improving a Multi-Element First-Year Engineering Cornerstone Autonomous Robotics Design Project

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Conference

2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Columbus, Ohio

Publication Date

June 24, 2017

Start Date

June 24, 2017

End Date

June 28, 2017

Conference Session

First-Year Programs: Design in the First Year

Tagged Division

First-Year Programs

Page Count

20

DOI

10.18260/1-2--28143

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/28143

Download Count

390

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Paper Authors

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David Joseph Frank Ohio State University

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David J. Frank is a 4th year Computer Engineering honors student at The Ohio State University and an Graduate Teaching Assistant for the Fundamentals of Engineering for Honors program. He will graduated with his B.S.E.C.E in May 2017, and his M.S.E.C.E in May 2018.

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Kelly Lynn Kolotka Ohio State University

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Kelly L. Kolotka is a third year Chemical Engineering honors student at The Ohio State University with a minor in Biomedical Engineering. She is currently the Co-Lead Undergraduate Teaching Assistant for the Fundamentals of Engineering for Honors program. She will graduate with her B.S. in Chemical Engineering in May of 2018.

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Andrew H. Phillips Ohio State University

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Andrew H. Phillips is a University Fellow and Graduate Teaching Assistant at The Ohio State University. He graduated summa cum laude from The Ohio State University in May 2016 with a B.S. degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering and with Honors Research Distinction. Currently, he is pursuing a Ph.D. in Electrical and Computer Engineering with research in integrated nonlinear optics, but he is also interested in Engineering Education. As a Graduate Teaching Assistant for the Fundamentals of Engineering for Honors program, he is heavily involved with teaching and developing laboratory content, leading the in-house robotics controller maintenance, and managing the robotics project development.

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Michael Schulz The Ohio State University

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Michael H. Schulz is a teaching assistant with the Fundamentals of Engineering Honors program at The Ohio State University. He is currently the lead developer of the robot course software development team, of which he has been a member for three years. As a Computer Science and Engineering (CSE) student, he will graduate in May, 2017 with his B.S.C.S.E and a minor in Music, Media, and Enterprise.

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Clare Rigney Ohio State University, Engineering Education Department

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Clare has been working as a teaching assistant for Fundamentals of Engineering for Honors (FEH) program at Ohio State since fall of 2015. She began as a student in the program in fall of 2014, studying Biomedical Engineering.

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Allen Benjamin Drown Ohio State University

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Allen is a third year Industrial and Systems Engineering Undergraduate student at The Ohio State University who is an Undergraduate Teaching Assistant for the Fundamentals of Engineering for Honors (FEH) Program. His interests include Engineering Education, Lean Logistics, and Humanitarian Engineering. He will graduate with his B.S.I.S.E in May, 2018.

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Robert G. Stricko III Ohio State University

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Robert "Bob" Stricko is graduating with a B.S. in biomedical engineering from Ohio State in May 2017. He has worked as a undergraduate teaching assistant for the FEH program since Autumn 2014. Leading up to the 2017 robot project, Bob worked as a co-lead for the construction team, where he led in the designing and building of the robot course. Following graduation, Bob will continue to pursue his goals of working in the medical device industry as he travels to California to work on the da Vinci Surgical System for Intuitive Surgical.

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Kathleen A. Harper Ohio State University

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Kathleen A. Harper is a senior lecturer in the Department of Engineering Education at The Ohio State University. She received her M. S. in physics and B. S. in electrical engineering and applied physics from Case Western Reserve University, and her Ph. D. in physics from The Ohio State University. She has been on the staff of Ohio State’s University Center for the Advancement of Teaching, in addition to teaching in both the physics department and department of engineering education. Her research interests address a broad spectrum of educational topics, but her current foci are adapting problem-solving instructional techniques to first-year engineering and incorporating engineering elements into K-12 science courses.

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Richard J. Freuler Ohio State University

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Richard J. (Rick) Freuler is a Professor of Practice and the Director for the Fundamentals of Engineering for Honors (FEH) Program in Ohio State's Department of Engineering Education in the College of Engineering. He teaches the two-semester FEH engineering course sequence and is active in engineering education research. He is also affiliated with the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department and conducts scale model investigations of gas turbine installations for jet engine test cells and for marine and industrial applications of gas turbines at the Aerospace Research Center at Ohio State. Dr. Freuler earned his Bachelor of Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering (1974), his B.S. in Computer and Information Science (1974), his M.S. in Aeronautical Engineering (1974), and his Ph.D. in Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering (1991) all from The Ohio State University.

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Abstract

Abstract

For the past 23 years, [the institution’s] College of Engineering has provided an honor’s first-year engineering program that rapidly develops the skills of incoming engineers. This is done through a course sequence involving traditional material, hands-on laboratory experiences, and a design/build project. The program culminates in this design/build project, which involves the building of autonomous robots to perform specific tasks on a provided course with certain restrictions. The basis of the project is to provide an outlet for students. At its core, the project’s base goal is to provide an opportunity for students to physically apply curriculum and further develop skills from the course sequence. Beyond this, the goals are to provide a project that is not only immensely compelling and interesting to students, but to also have that project incorporate modern real world elements and rapidly develop new skills in students that extend beyond the curriculum.

To engage students at multiple levels and provide a variety of resources, the robot project is comprised of many elements. Teams of four students manage, budget, document, design, build, and program their own autonomous robot. They use technical communication, technical graphics, and programming skills learned from the rest of the first-year sequence. In addition, students have access to a robot controller, a machine workshop, a program-run store with stock materials and parts, and laser cutting and 3D printing capabilities. Teams spend time in and out of class testing on the physical course and interact with it through the themed tasks and the electronics hardware and software which provide automatic scoring and feedback. Throughout, students are guided by instructional teams, including undergraduate and graduate teaching assistants, through in-class explorations, weekly performance tests, and general help. The development and improvement of all these elements over the years are detailed along with their impact on student learning and engineering experience.

Frank, D. J., & Kolotka, K. L., & Phillips, A. H., & Schulz, M., & Rigney, C., & Drown, A. B., & Stricko, R. G., & Harper, K. A., & Freuler, R. J. (2017, June), Developing and Improving a Multi-Element First-Year Engineering Cornerstone Autonomous Robotics Design Project Paper presented at 2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Columbus, Ohio. 10.18260/1-2--28143

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