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Developing Web Based Courses Using An Online Development Guide And Templates

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Conference

1998 Annual Conference

Location

Seattle, Washington

Publication Date

June 28, 1998

Start Date

June 28, 1998

End Date

July 1, 1998

ISSN

2153-5965

Page Count

8

Page Numbers

3.196.1 - 3.196.8

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/7027

Download Count

44

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Paper Authors

author page

James Rehg

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 2247

Developing Web-Based Courses Using an Online Development Guide and Templates

James A. Rehg Penn State Altoona

Abstract

The impact of the web on engineering and engineering technology education is difficult to predict, but it is safe to say that instructional delivery will change as a result of Internet technology. This paper describes how a traditional engineering technology course can be converted to web delivery using fourteen prepared HTML templates. Seven of the templates use standard HTML scripts, and seven use some advanced scripting techniques, including Dynamic HTML (DHTML) and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS). In addition, various techniques used to deliver course content are discussed, and links to many examples of online courses are provided. A web-based version of this paper with active links to all information can be viewed at http://cac.psu.edu/~jar14/web/temp.html. The many active links provided in the online version of this paper offer a much richer resource base for web-course development, and readers are encouraged to use that document if possible.

Introduction

John Naisbitt's 1982 best selling book1, 2, Megatrends, used a method called content analysis to study society and to identify major new trends entering the marketplace. This technique, developed during World War II in order to analyze the conditions in Axis countries, uses the frequency with which a topic is referenced in the media to identify marketplace undercurrents that drive change. If that technique were applied today, the Internet and its associated technologies would be identified as a gigatrend. The impact on engineering and engineering technology education is hard to predict, but it is safe to say that the delivery of instruction will change as a result of the World Wide Web (WWW). This paper describes a minimal HTML scripting process that any faculty member could use to move instructional content from a traditional lecture course to the web, using a set of course templates. In addition, the paper compares technologies used to deliver content over the web and discusses the resources3 available to the web course developer. A web-based version of this paper with active links to all information can be viewed at http://cac.psu.edu/~jar14/web/temp.html. The many active links provided in the on-line version of this paper offer a much richer resource base for web-course development, and readers are encouraged to use that document if possible.

Web-Based Instruction - Advantages

The issue with any new instructional delivery mode is improved levels of learning for the students. Clearly, web-based courses offer advantages in access to course information, in

Rehg, J. (1998, June), Developing Web Based Courses Using An Online Development Guide And Templates Paper presented at 1998 Annual Conference, Seattle, Washington. https://peer.asee.org/7027

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