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Developing Wind Power Simulations And Laboratory Experiments For Courses In Renewable Energy Systems

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Conference

2009 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Austin, Texas

Publication Date

June 14, 2009

Start Date

June 14, 2009

End Date

June 17, 2009

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

10

Page Numbers

14.461.1 - 14.461.10

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/4761

Download Count

147

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Paper Authors

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David Burnham University of Texas, Austin

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David J. Burnham earned his B.S degree in Electrical Engineering from Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth College in 2003. He expects to earn his MSE degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Texas at Austin in May 2009. He is a research assistant working on the project described in the paper.

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Jules Campbell University of Texas, Austin

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Jules Campbell is a PhD candidate at UT Austin. He received his BSEE degree from Washington University in St. Louis and MSEE degree from UT Austin in May 2008. His primary interests lie in the development of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Systems and Technologies, Power Electronics and Mixed Signal Circuit Design techniques.

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Surya Santoso University of Texas, Austin

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Dr. Santoso received the B.S. degree in electrical
engineering from Satya Wacana Christian University, Indonesia, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Texas at Austin in 1992, 1994, and 1996, respectively, all in electrical engineering.

From 1997 to 2003, he was a Senior Power Systems/Consulting Engineer with Electrotek Concepts, Knoxville, TN. Since 2003, he has been an Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Texas at Austin. His current research interests include power system analysis, modeling, and simulation, and impacts of wind power on power systems. He is the coauthor of Electrical Power Systems Quality (McGraw-Hill, 2002).

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Arturo Compean University of Texas, Pan American

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Arturo Compean earned his B.S. in Civil Engineering in 2004. He expects to earn his B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering with a minor in Computer Science at University of Texas Pan-American. His interests lie in the development of nuclear energy efficiency and renewable energy systems, power electronics, and mixed signal circuit design techniques. He is a research assistant working on the project described in the paper.

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Jaime Ramos University of Texas, Pan American

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Dr. Ramos earned his MSE and Ph.D degrees from Stanford University in 1972 and 1976, respectively, all in electrical engineering. He teaches electrical engineering and renewable energy courses at the University of Texas at Pan American since 2005. He was a professor and researcher in a number of Mexican universities since 1977. His research interests include energy conversion and power system analysis.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Developing Wind Power Simulations and Laboratory Experiments for Renewable Energy Systems Courses D. J. Burnham,⋆ J. C. Campbell,⋆ S. Santoso,⋆ A. Compean,⋆⋆ J. Ramos⋆⋆

1 Introduction

In recent years wind turbine technologies have made significant advances, and more than 30 U.S. states have implemented aggressive renewable portfolio standards. These standards require that electric utilities obtain 10% to 30% of their energy from renewable sources, with target dates between 2020 and 2030.1 In support of this effort the U.S. Department of Energy is considering the viability of wind energy to supply up to 20% of nation’s electricity by 2030.2 In addition to the technical challenge of integrating wind power into the national grids, another critical challenge in the 20% wind power scenario involves preparing the science and engineering workforce for the changing electric power and emerging wind industries. Unfortunately, engineering courses have not kept pace over the years. There are only a few universities that regularly offer renewable energy and wind power courses, and a lack of appropriate learning materials and faculty expertise in this emerging area.2

Our primary focus and contribution in this project is the development of learning materials on wind turbine technologies and wind power experiments for undergraduate-level engineering courses. These experiments cover wind turbine technologies and wind power integration issues with both computer simulations and hardware implementations. Technologies covered include fixed speed wind turbine with induction generators and variable speed wind turbines with rotor resistor control and doubly-fed induction generators. Wind power integration experiments include wind farm operations under varying wind speeds, reactive power requirements, islanded operation, and power control. The experiments are divided into basic, intermediate, and advanced levels. The basic and intermediate experiments are integrated into relevant electrical engineering and non-electrical engineering courses.3 Advanced level experiments are integrated into a stand-alone coursed dedicated to wind energy and power systems.

This paper describes the first year’s work and how the learning materials and experiments are developed and constructed. The basic experiments are described in detail. Topics include the fixed-speed direct connect wind turbine, operation and reactive power requirements of wind turbines, and self-excited and islanded operation of a wind turbine. The computer simulations make use of PSCAD/EMTDC, a time-domain electromechanical simulation tool available in student and educational versions.4 The hardware-based experiments are initially developed for a Lab-Volt electromechanical laboratory system at the University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin), and we address the issue of their transferability and portability to a similar Hamden laboratory system at the University of Texas - Pan American (UTPA) in Edinburg, TX.5−6 The experiments are evaluated independently with the assistance of undergraduate students at both institutions. The evaluation is ongoing, and will continue in the second year’s work. ⋆ The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX ⋆⋆ The University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, TX

Burnham, D., & Campbell, J., & Santoso, S., & Compean, A., & Ramos, J. (2009, June), Developing Wind Power Simulations And Laboratory Experiments For Courses In Renewable Energy Systems Paper presented at 2009 Annual Conference & Exposition, Austin, Texas. https://peer.asee.org/4761

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