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Development and Assessment of Energy Modules in the Chemical Engineering Curriculum

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Conference

2011 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Vancouver, BC

Publication Date

June 26, 2011

Start Date

June 26, 2011

End Date

June 29, 2011

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Emerging Areas: Biotechnology, Microtechnology, and Energy

Tagged Division

Chemical Engineering

Page Count

13

Page Numbers

22.465.1 - 22.465.13

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/17746

Download Count

109

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Paper Authors

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Jason M. Keith Michigan Technological University

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Jason Keith is an Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering at Michigan Technological University. He received his B.S.Ch.E. from the University of Akron in 1995, and his Ph.D. from the University of Notre Dame in 2001. He is the 2008 recipient of the Raymond W. Fahien Award for Outstanding Teaching Effectiveness and Educational Scholarship as well as a 2010 inductee into the Michigan Technological University Academy of Teaching Excellence. His current research interests include reactor stability, alternative energy, and engineering education. He is active within ASEE.

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Daniel López Gaxiola Michigan Technological University

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Daniel A. Crowl Michigan Technological University

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David W. Caspary Michigan Technological University

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David Caspary is the Manager of Laboratory Facilities and Instructor in the Chemical Engineering Department at Michigan Technological University. He received a B.S. Engineering degree from Michigan Tech in 1982 and has also worked as a Training Specialist, Project Engineer, and Project Manager. He has over 25 years experience instructing and coordinating Unit Operations and Plant Operations Laboratory, implementing distributed control and data acquisition systems, and designing pilot-scale processing equipment.

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Abhijit Mukherjee Michigan Technological University

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Dennis Desheng Meng Michigan Technological University

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Dennis Desheng Meng is currently an Assistant Professor at the Department of Mechanical Engineering - Engineering Mechanics of Michigan Tech. Dr. Meng obtained his Ph.D. degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) in 2005 along with the Outstanding Ph.D. Award. After he joined Michigan Tech in August 2007, Dr. Meng started the Multi-Scale Energy Systems (MuSES) Laboratory to work on micro- and nanotechnology for energy applications. He is currently leading a group of six students and one postdoctoral associate to work on various research projects, including micro fuel cells, micro batteries, micro supercapacitors, production of metal nanoparticles by short-distance sputtering, microfluidic fabrication of self-healing materials, thermal management for powerMEMS, and biomedical application of superhydrophilic surfaces.

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Jeffrey D. Naber Michigan Technological University

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Jeffrey S. Allen Michigan Technological University

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John T. Lukowski Michigan Technological University

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Barry D. Solomon Michigan Technological University

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Jay Scott Meldrum Sr. Michigan Technological University

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Thomas F. Edgar University of Texas, Austin

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Abstract

Development and Assessment of Energy Modules in the Chemical Engineering CurriculumAs part of a curriculum development project, a set of hydrogen and fuel cell modules hasbeen developed for use in core chemical, mechanical, and electrical engineering courses.The formation of the modules centers about the principle that students learn best bydoing. Each module contains an introduction, problem motivation and background,example problem statement, example problem solution, and a homework problemstatement. Instructors can obtain the solutions from the lead author by email.The modules have been used at ________ University in the following manner:  There is a short lecture on a chemical engineering topic  The students are given a module to serve as an in-class problem  The students work through the example problem in the module during class  The students begin solution of the homework problem during class  The instructor circulates around the room and assists students if they have any questions  The homework problem is due at a future class meetingThere are also alternative ways to use the modules, such as being given them for out ofclass assignments, which was often the case when the modules were tested at otherinstitutions.In this paper we report on the development, testing, and assessment of these modules andreport future directions.

Keith, J. M., & Gaxiola, D. L., & Crowl, D. A., & Caspary, D. W., & Mukherjee, A., & Meng, D. D., & Naber, J. D., & Allen, J. S., & Lukowski, J. T., & Solomon, B. D., & Meldrum, J. S., & Edgar, T. F. (2011, June), Development and Assessment of Energy Modules in the Chemical Engineering Curriculum Paper presented at 2011 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Vancouver, BC. https://peer.asee.org/17746

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