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Development And Implementation Of An Interactive Instructional Module For Light Distribution In Tissue

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Conference

2001 Annual Conference

Location

Albuquerque, New Mexico

Publication Date

June 24, 2001

Start Date

June 24, 2001

End Date

June 27, 2001

ISSN

2153-5965

Page Count

13

Page Numbers

6.363.1 - 6.363.13

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/9113

Download Count

51

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Paper Authors

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Wei-Chiang Lin

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Mark A. Mackanos

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E. Duco Jansen

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Anita Mahadevan-Jansen

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Sean P. Brophy

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 2509

Development and Implementation of an Interactive Instructional Module of Light Distribution in Tissue

E. Duco Jansen, Anita Mahadevan-Jansen, Wei-Chiang Lin, Sean P. Brophy, Mark A. Mackanos

Department of Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN

Abstract At the very core of the field of biomedical optics (defined as the use of light from far-ultraviolet through the visible into the infrared for diagnostic, therapeutic and sensing applications in medicine and biology) lies a thorough understanding of light distribution in biological tissue. Courses in this field typically put significant emphasis on student’s understanding of light transport in tissue. Analytically this process is described by the light transport equation which has little utility in helping students who are novices in this field obtain a conceptual understanding of light distribution in tissue. Students at all levels struggle with the concepts and have difficulty obtaining a working knowledge of the role of the various tissue properties, boundary conditions and laser parameters on light transport. The goal of this project was 1) to develop an interactive and visual learning module based on Monte Carlo simulations as education tool; 2) design learning activities to help students systematically explore the properties of light and tissue interaction relative to specific goals; and 3) to implement this module and its graphical interface in a Biomedical Engineering course in Biomedical Optics. Preliminary evaluations suggest that the hands-on experience of students using this module results in an increased conceptual understanding of light distribution in tissue. In addition, this method exposes students to the value, capabilities, as well as difficulties and limitations of numerical modeling of processes in Biomedical Engineering in general.

1. Introduction The field of Biomedical Optics has become an important area for medicine and biology in which Biomedical Engineering professionals play a key role. Whether students pursue careers in Biomedical Engineering research centers, biomedical companies, or go on to the medical professions, they are almost certain to encounter optical technologies for diagnosis, sensing and therapy. It is expected that optical science and optical technology will be at the forefront of development of new enabling technologies and devices both in the basic science labs as well as in a clinical setting. Thus, several programs around the country, including ours, are actively working on course development in the area of Biomedical Optics. At Vanderbilt University we have developed a senior Biomedical Engineering elective course entitled ‘Introduction to Biomedical Optics’. In this context, Biomedical Engineering is defined as ‘the use of light from the far-ultraviolet through the visible into the infrared for diagnostic, therapeutic and sensing applications in medicine and biology’.

Proceedings of the 2001 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright  2001, American Society for Engineering Education

Lin, W., & Mackanos, M. A., & Jansen, E. D., & Mahadevan-Jansen, A., & Brophy, S. P. (2001, June), Development And Implementation Of An Interactive Instructional Module For Light Distribution In Tissue Paper presented at 2001 Annual Conference, Albuquerque, New Mexico. https://peer.asee.org/9113

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