Asee peer logo

Development of a Design Canvas with Application to First-Year and Capstone Design Courses

Download Paper |

Conference

2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Columbus, Ohio

Publication Date

June 24, 2017

Start Date

June 24, 2017

End Date

June 28, 2017

Conference Session

Entrepreneurship and Innovation in First-Year Programs

Tagged Division

Entrepreneurship & Engineering Innovation

Page Count

15

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/28159

Download Count

73

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

William A. Kline Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

visit author page

Bill Kline is Associate Dean of Innovation and Professor of Engineering Management at Rose-Hulman. He joined Rose-Hulman in 2001 and his teaching and professional interests include systems engineering, design, quality, innovation, and entrepreneurship.

Prior to joining Rose-Hulman, his industry experience includes roles as cofounder and Chief Operating Officer at Montronix and development manager at Kennametal.

Bill is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Illinois College and a Bronze Tablet graduate of University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign where he received a Ph.D. degree in Mechanical Engineering.

visit author page

biography

William D. Schindel ICTT System Sciences

visit author page

William D. Schindel is president of ICTT System Sciences, a systems engineering company, and developer of the Systematica Methodology for model and pattern-based systems engineering. His 40-year engineering career began in mil/aero systems with IBM Federal Systems, Owego, NY, included service as a faculty member of Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, and founding of three commercial systems-based enterprises. He has consulted on improvement of engineering processes within automotive, medical/health care, manufacturing, telecommunications, aerospace, and consumer products businesses. Schindel earned the BS and MS in Mathematics.

visit author page

biography

Joe Tranquillo Bucknell University

visit author page

Dr. Joseph (Joe) Tranquillo is an Associate Professor at Bucknell University in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, He is also co-director of the Institute for Leadership in Technology and Management, co-director of the KEEN Winter Interdisciplinary Design Program, and chair of the Biomedical Engineering Division of ASEE. Tranquillo has published three undergraduate textbooks and numerous engineering education publications, and has presented internationally on engineering and education. His work has been featured on the Discovery Channel, CNN Heath and TEDx. He was a US Case Professor of the Year nominee and a National Academy of Engineering Frontiers of Engineering Education faculty member.

visit author page

biography

Ashley Bernal Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

visit author page

Ashley Bernal is an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. She received her PhD from Georgia Institute of Technology in 2011. She was an American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) teaching fellow and Student Teaching Enhancement Partnership (STEP) Fellow. Prior to receiving her PhD, she worked as a subsystems engineer at Boeing on the Joint Unmanned Combat Air Systems (JUCAS) program. Her research areas of interest include piezoelectrics, nanomanufacturing, optical measuring techniques, and intercultural design.

visit author page

biography

Cory Hixson Rowan University

visit author page

Cory is currently an Assistant Professor of Experiential Engineering Education (ExEEd) at Rowan University. He earned his B.S. in Engineering Science (2007), M.S. in Industrial and System Engineering (2014) and Ph.D. in Engineering Education (2016). Cory has experience as both a professional engineer and high school educator. His professional and research interests are understanding the interaction between engineering education pedagogy and entrepreneurship, faculty technology commercialization experiences, and institutional policies that influence both engineering education and entrepreneurship.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract

Development of a Canvas for a First-Year Design Course

The adoption of canvas tools in entrepreneurship and design education is increasing. The Business Model Canvas (BMC), perhaps one of the best-known canvas tools, is the key element of the Lean LaunchPad methodology – a widely utilized approach to business model development. Importantly, using canvases like the BMC supports student learning through a data-driven and iterative process that actively engages students. Another benefit of the canvas approach in an educational setting is they can be used in a preliminary or conceptual design phase, where students can begin to identify and make associations among the key themes of the more complete underlying models used to represent the physical system being envisioned and developed. Because of these benefits, the use of the canvases has led to the development of other canvases with some expressly created for design courses in engineering education settings.

A model-based approach for understanding and developing canvases has recently been developed and presented. This approach notes that canvases are high level representations of underlying complex systems. As alluded to above, these complex systems can be business models, but they can also be products, devices, or manufacturing and delivery systems. Briefly, a canvas is constructed by selecting the key themes of systems models that represent the underlying physical systems. Through this representation, canvases can be developed or characterized by identifying and illustrating 1) the underlying system being conceptualized, 2) the model used to represent the system, and 3) the themes selected from the model to be placed on the canvas.

Despite these benefits and new approaches to developing canvases, many of the canvases currently being used are better suited for use by experienced and sophisticated users and may be too complex for use by students in underclass or first-year design courses. Using the model based approach described above, a process for developing a canvas for a first-year design course is illustrated in this paper. The process enables an instructor to develop a canvas for their course by examining the learning objectives for the course and identifying the key themes of their learning system and content. Finally, we utilize this process to propose a canvas for a first-year design course.

Kline, W. A., & Schindel, W. D., & Tranquillo, J., & Bernal, A., & Hixson, C. (2017, June), Development of a Design Canvas with Application to First-Year and Capstone Design Courses Paper presented at 2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Columbus, Ohio. https://peer.asee.org/28159

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2017 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015