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Development of an Integrated Electro-mechanical Energy Conversion System to Support Undergraduate Electrical Engineering Curriculum

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Conference

2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Columbus, Ohio

Publication Date

June 24, 2017

Start Date

June 24, 2017

End Date

June 28, 2017

Conference Session

Instrumentation Division Technical Session 1

Tagged Division

Instrumentation

Page Count

13

DOI

10.18260/1-2--28168

Permanent URL

https://216.185.13.174/28168

Download Count

723

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Paper Authors

biography

Kenan Hatipoglu West Virginia University Insttitute of Technology

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Kenan Hatipoglu is an assistant professor at Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at West Virginia University Institute of Technology. He completed his Master of Science degree in Electrical Engineering at University of Louisville, Kentucky in 2008 and joined Tennessee Tech University in 2009 to pursue his Ph.D. in Electrical (Power) Engineering. He completed his graduate study in August 2013. He received his Bachelor’s degree in Electrical Education from Department of Electrical Education in Faculty of Technical Education and Technology Engineering at Marmara University, Istanbul, Turkey in 2005. His current research interests include smartgrid and microgrid applications, power system control, renewable energy resources, power electronics and engineering education .

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Mingyu Lu West Virginia University Institute of Technology

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Mingyu Lu received the B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering from Tsinghua University, Beijing, China, in 1995 and 1997 respectively, and the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2002. From 1997 to 2002, he was a research assistant at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering in the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. From 2002 to 2005, he was a postdoctoral research associate at the Electromagnetics Laboratory in the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He was an assistant professor with the Department of Electrical Engineering, the University of Texas at Arlington from 2005 to 2012. He joined the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, West Virginia University Institute of Technology in 2012, and he is currently an associate professor. His current research interests include wireless power transmission, radar systems, microwave remote sensing, antenna design, and computational electromagnetics. He was the recipient of the first prize award in the student paper competition of the IEEE International Antennas and Propagation Symposium, Boston, MA in 2001. He served as the chair of Antennas and Propagation Society of IEEE Fort Worth Chapter from 2006 to 2011.

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Afrin Naz West Virginia University Institute of Technology

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Dr. Afrin Naz is an assistant professor at the Computer Science and Information Systems department at West Virginia University Institute of Technology. She is working with high school teachers to inspire the K-12 students to the STEM fields. In last four years Dr. Naz and her team launched six workshops for high school teachers. Currently her team is training the high school teachers to offer online materials to supplement their face-to-face classroom.

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Yogendra M. Panta West Virginia University Institute of Technology

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Dr. Panta is an Assistant Professor of mechanical engineering at West Virginia University Institute of Technology. His research area is in fluid thermal science, and Computational Fluid Mechanics. Panta received M.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Youngstown State University, and a Ph.D. Mechanical Engineering from University of Nevada Las Vegas.

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Steven Kent Blevins West Virginia University Institute of Technology

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Steven Blevins is currently a senior majoring in electrical engineering at West Virginia University Institute of Technology. He is currently working as an electrical engineering intern, and will be graduating with a Bachelor's of Science in Electrical Engineering with a minor in Mathematics in December 2017.

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Abstract

As the underlying technology of many vital industries such as electric vehicle and wind turbine, electro-mechanical energy conversion is an important topic of the undergraduate engineering programs. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the development of an integrated electro-mechanical energy conversion system. The system is capable of demonstrating more than 50 realistic motor and generator configurations. In each mode, the system can be further reconfigured to various motor and generator architectures, such as series DC motors, shunt DC motors, compound DC motors, AC motors, single-phase generators, and three-phase generators. The electro-mechanical energy conversion system is comprised of four major components: (i) a reconfigurable machine, (ii) an actuator with built-in sensors, (iii) a programmable controller, and (iv) a data collector. These four components are coordinated by a personal computer, such that the system performance can be controlled and visualized in real time. It allows students to assemble a motor/generator from parts, optimize its configuration, and control/measure its performance in real time. The electro-mechanical system is used primarily to support the undergraduate curricula of three departments at the University, including Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Mechanical Engineering Department, and Computer Science Department. This project is highly inter-disciplinary. It involves four faculty members. Expertise of the four investigators is complementary to each other and covers all the aspects of this project. The four investigators collaborates to build and test the proposed system, and also integrate it in undergraduate curricula. This project therefore established an excellent platform for collaborative efforts among faculties and students from three departments, and it inspires numerous innovative ideas across disciplinary boundaries. At present, the Power Laboratory of the University has a number of instruments manufactured by LabVolt to demonstrate fundamental concepts of electro-mechanical energy conversion. However, none of the existing instruments has the capability of allowing students to assemble a motor/generator from parts, optimize the motor/generator configuration, and visualize its performance. Compared with the existing instruments, the proposed electro-mechanical system is greatly versatile and flexible. It enables students to have hands-on experience with various types of electro-mechanical system and control/measure their performance in real time. Thus, access to the proposed system is anticipated to enhance the students’ learning effectiveness tremendously. Currently, the integrated electro-mechanical energy conversion system has been constructed in September 2016 and is currently under various tests.

Hatipoglu, K., & Lu, M., & Naz, A., & Panta, Y. M., & Blevins, S. K. (2017, June), Development of an Integrated Electro-mechanical Energy Conversion System to Support Undergraduate Electrical Engineering Curriculum Paper presented at 2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Columbus, Ohio. 10.18260/1-2--28168

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