Asee peer logo

Development Of An Introduction To Transportation Engineering Course Using Experience Based Learning To Bring Afghanistan Into The Classroom

Download Paper |

Conference

2010 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Louisville, Kentucky

Publication Date

June 20, 2010

Start Date

June 20, 2010

End Date

June 23, 2010

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Learning by Doing

Tagged Division

Civil Engineering

Page Count

18

Page Numbers

15.416.1 - 15.416.18

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/15669

Download Count

50

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Nicholas Melin United States Military Academy

visit author page

Major Nicholas Melin is an Assistant Professor in the Civil Engineering Department at the United States Military Academy, West Point, NY. He received his BS from the United States Military Academy and his PhD as a Rhodes Scholar from Oxford University, England. He has taught engineering mechanics and civil engineering design courses. His research interests include rapidly deployable structural systems and practical engineering education applications.

visit author page

biography

Richard Hallon United States Military Academy

visit author page

Captain Richard Hallon is an Instructor in the Civil Engineering Department at the United States Military Academy, West Point, NY. He received his BS from the Florida International University and his MS from Carnegie Mellon University. He has taught engineering mechanics, construction management, and transportation engineering courses. His research interests include analysis, design, and education in the field transportation engineering.

visit author page

biography

Joseph Hanus United States Military Academy

visit author page

Lieutenant Colonel Joseph Hanus is the acting Chair of the Civil Engineering Department at the United States Military Academy, West Point, NY. He received his BS from the University of Wisconsin - Platteville; MS from the University of Minnesota - Twin Cities; and PhD from the University of Wisconsin - Madison. He is an active member of ASEE and is a registered Professional Engineer in Wisconsin. His research interests include fiber reinforced polymer materials, accelerated bridge construction, and engineering education.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Development of an Introduction to Transportation Engineering Course - Using Experience-Based Learning to Bring Afghanistan Into the Classroom

Abstract

The development of an Introduction to Transportation Engineering Course in the Civil Engineering Program at the United States Military Academy is discussed, which includes experienced-based learning. Motivation for the development of the course structure is based on the fact that the graduates are in a unique position in comparison with their contemporaries at civilian universities. Each graduate of the program has a guaranteed job upon graduation as a platoon leader in the United States Army. Moreover, many will choose to become Corps of Engineers officers and step into construction management jobs as their first professional experience. The mission of the Corps of Engineers encompasses military construction around the globe and the management of a massive civil works program in both the United States and abroad. Given an officer population in the Corps of Engineers that comes from diverse educational backgrounds, it is also a reality that many of our graduates will be one of only a few degreed civil engineers in their first military unit. In general, Academy provides approximately half of the ABET accredited engineers to the US Army.

With so much riding on these young engineers’ ability to leverage their education as soon as they graduate, the stakes are high for educators in the Academy’s Civil Engineering department. Add to this the fact that many graduating seniors will deploy to Afghanistan soon after they complete their undergraduate education, and a situation exists where education must both prepare cadets to understand the theoretical foundation of engineering as well as its effective practice in the deployed environment. Though there are challenges associated with preparing engineers in training to take on such large tasks, there are advantages as well. Having knowledge of the specific jobs that our graduates will assume brings with it the potential to focus the “application” portion of the civil engineering curriculum and communicate with our customer, the Corps of Engineers, on what professional tasks a civil engineer must accomplish in a deployed environment.

This paper will discuss the development of the Introduction to Transportation Engineering course, from modeling the course structure based on a successful Construction Management Course to the specific development of experienced-based learning lessons. Underpinning the endeavor is the recognition that the true value of the structure and experienced-based learning experiences in the course is that students will achieve a higher level of development in the cognitive and affective domains – which are necessary to meeting the mission of the Academy and the Department. Furthermore, the authors believe that the selected content and overall approach in the introductory transportation engineering course presented in this paper is of interest to other institutions who are adding similar courses to their program.

Melin, N., & Hallon, R., & Hanus, J. (2010, June), Development Of An Introduction To Transportation Engineering Course Using Experience Based Learning To Bring Afghanistan Into The Classroom Paper presented at 2010 Annual Conference & Exposition, Louisville, Kentucky. https://peer.asee.org/15669

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2010 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015