Asee peer logo

Development of Bloom’s-level Graduated Instrument for Assessing Transport Concepts in Hands-on Learning

Download Paper |

Conference

2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Tampa, Florida

Publication Date

June 15, 2019

Start Date

June 15, 2019

End Date

June 19, 2019

Conference Session

Mechanical Engineering Division Technical Session 4

Tagged Division

Mechanical Engineering

Page Count

14

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/32654

Download Count

3

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Aminul Islam Khan P.E. Washington State University

visit author page

Aminul Islam Khan
PhD Candidate
School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering
Washington State University, Pullman, WA

Bio-sketch

Aminul Islam Khan has received B.Sc and M.Sc in Mechanical Engineering from the most regarded and reputed engineering university of Bangladesh, Bangladesh University Engineering and Technology (BUET). In his B.Sc degree, he had received the department Gold medal for his outstanding achievements.

Aminul Islam Khan has joined to BUET in 2011 as a Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering Department. In 2015, he has become an Assistant Professor in the same department of BUET. In 2016, he has joined to School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering of WSU as a PhD student. From that time, he has been working as a Research Assistant. As a research assistant, he has been working to improve learning/teaching methods in undergraduate engineering education along with his scientific research. He is currently working on drug delivery approach modeling for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

Aminul Islam Khan is committed to excellence in teaching as well as research and always promotes a student-centered learning environment. He has a keen ability to teach, advise, and recruit students. He has also proven himself to be a very effective researcher by publishing several journal articles. His resume has a substantial list of publications, including peer-reviewed articles in national and international journals and conferences. Moreover, he has joined in several reputed conferences, for example American Physical Society (APS), and presented his scholarly works.

visit author page

biography

Kitana Kaiphanliam Washington State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-9799-0463

visit author page

Kitana Kaiphanliam is a first-year doctoral student in the Chemical Engineering program at Washington State University (WSU). Her research interests include biomanufacturing for immunotherapy applications and miniaturized hands-on learning devices for engineering education. Kitana is an active member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) at WSU, and serves as their Graduate Student Chair for the 2018-19 academic year.

visit author page

biography

David B. Thiessen Washington State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-4283-5914

visit author page

David B.Thiessen received his Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Colorado in
1992 and has been at Washington State University since 1994. His research interests include fluid
physics, acoustics, and engineering education.

visit author page

biography

Bernard J. Van Wie Washington State University

visit author page

Prof. Bernard J. Van Wie received his B.S., M.S. and Ph.D., and did his postdoctoral work at the University of Oklahoma where he also taught as a visiting lecturer. He has been on the Washington State University (WSU) faculty for 36 years and for the past 27 years has focused on innovative pedagogy research and technical research in biotechnology. His 2007-2008 Fulbright exchange to Nigeria set the stage for him to receive the Marian Smith Award given annually to the most innovative teacher at WSU. He was also the recent recipient of the inaugural 2016 Innovation in Teaching Award given to one WSU faculty member per year.

visit author page

biography

Olusola Olalekan Adesope Washington State University

visit author page

Dr. Olusola O. Adesope is an Associate Professor of Educational Psychology and a Boeing Distinguished Professor of STEM Education at Washington State University, Pullman. His research is at the intersection of educational psychology, learning sciences, and instructional design and technology. His recent research focuses on the cognitive and pedagogical underpinnings of learning with computer-based multimedia resources; knowledge representation through interactive concept maps; meta-analysis of empirical research, and investigation of instructional principles and assessments in STEM. He is a Senior Associate Editor for the Journal of Engineering Education. He is a Senior Associate Editor for the Journal of Engineering Education.

visit author page

biography

Prashanta Dutta Washington State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-5082-3994

visit author page

Prof. Prashanta Dutta has received his PhD degree in Mechanical Engineering from the Texas A&M University in 2001. Since then he has been working as an Assistant Professor at the School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering at Washington State University. He was promoted to the rank of Associate and Full Professor in 2007 and 2013, respectively. Prof. Dutta is an elected Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). He current serves as a Deputy Editor for the Electrophoresis.

visit author page

biography

Jacqueline Burgher Gartner Campbell University

visit author page

Jacqueline Burgher Gartner is an Assistant Professor at Campbell University in the School of Engineering, which offers a broad BS in engineering with concentrations in chemical and mechanical engineering. Campbell University started the engineering program in 2016, and she is leading the design and implementation of the chemical engineering curriculum at Campbell's innovative, project based pedagogical approach. She has a PhD in chemical engineering from Washington State University, where she specialized in miniaturizing industrial systems for applications in the undergraduate engineering classroom.

visit author page

biography

Olivia Reynolds Washington State University

visit author page

First year Chemical Engineering doctoral student pursuing research on the development and dissemination of low-cost, hands-on learning modules displaying heat and mass transfer concepts in a highly visual, interactive format. Graduated from Washington State University with a B.S. degree in Chemical Engineering in 2017. Currently also working towards completing an M.S. degree with work related to potentiometric biosensing.

visit author page

biography

Negar Beheshti Pour Washington State University

visit author page

Negar Beheshtipour received her B.S. in chemical Engineering at Tehran University where she also taught as a teacher assistant. She is currently working towards a PhD in Chemical Engineering at Washington State University under supervision of Dr. Van Wie and Dr. Thiessen. In addition to her chemical engineering research into phase separation in microgravity, Negar is interested in engineering education and new pedagogies. Now she is working on low-cost version of desktop learning modules.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract

Each engineering student who enters a fluid mechanics and heat transfer course has his or her own perception on transport phenomena, where the foundation of these perceptions could be built on previous coursework or experiences. As students progress through these courses, they build on such perceptions and develop a better understanding of the subject. Often, though, there is a lack of depth in knowledge of fundamental transport phenomena concepts. This level of understanding is necessary for enduring effects on student abilities. From data and literature, it has been proven that hands-on learning is more effective than passive learning in developing this depth in conceptual understanding. As a result, low-cost desktop learning modules (LC-DLMs) were developed to enhance student levels of understanding of various fundamental transport phenomena concepts such as hydraulic loss, energy exchange in a venturi meter, and heat exchange. There is a lack of robust measures, however, for assessing student levels of understanding. To address this gap, Bloom’s taxonomy can be used to categorize learning outcomes, measure learning gains, and better analyze levels of understanding of concepts relative to the LC-DLMs. This method provides a quantitative means to predict areas in which course development can be focused to improve the learning ability of an average student. The goal of this paper is to explicate the development of Bloom’s taxonomy graduated questions to achieve a proper understanding of different transport phenomena through LC-DLMs. A detailed outline of the development of Bloom’s taxonomy-based questions is provided to ensure a concrete base for the quantitative assessments. Results from preliminary evaluations of these Bloom’s taxonomy graduated questions, along with the implications and limitations of these results will be presented.

Khan, A. I., & Kaiphanliam, K., & Thiessen, D. B., & Van Wie, B. J., & Adesope, O. O., & Dutta, P., & Gartner, J. B., & Reynolds, O., & Beheshti Pour, N. (2019, June), Development of Bloom’s-level Graduated Instrument for Assessing Transport Concepts in Hands-on Learning Paper presented at 2019 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition , Tampa, Florida. https://peer.asee.org/32654

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2019 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015