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Development Of Master’s Programs In Sustainable Engineering

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Conference

2008 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Publication Date

June 22, 2008

Start Date

June 22, 2008

End Date

June 25, 2008

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Sustainability and Engineering Programs

Tagged Division

Environmental Engineering

Page Count

11

Page Numbers

13.433.1 - 13.433.11

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/3736

Download Count

40

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Paper Authors

biography

Brian Thorn Rochester Institute of Technology

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BRIAN K. THORN is an associate professor in the Industrial and Systems Engineering Department at the Rochester Institute of Technology in New York. He received a B.S. in Industrial Engineering from the Rochester Institute of Technology, an M.S. and Ph.D. from the Georgia Institute of Technology. His research interests include sustainable product and process design, life cycle analysis and applied statistical methods.

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biography

Andres Carrano Rochester Institute of Technology

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ANDRES L. CARRANO is an associate professor in the Industrial and Systems Engineering Department at the Rochester Institute of Technology in New York. He received a B.S. in Industrial Engineering from the Catholic University in Venezuela, an M.S. and Ph.D. from North Carolina State University. His research interests include surface metrology, sustainable product and process design as well as life cycle analysis.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Development of Master’s Programs in Sustainable Engineering at the Rochester Institute of Technology

Abstract

During the 2006-2007 academic year, a team of faculty from the Kate Gleason College of Engineering developed a proposal for a pair of Master’s programs (a Master of Science program and a Master of Engineering proposal) in the field of Sustainable Engineering. Sustainable Engineering has been described as “engineering for human development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs” [3]. Both programs are multidisciplinary in nature and include coursework from the disciplines of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Civil Engineering Technology, and Public Policy. The programs offer students the flexibility to develop ‘tracks’ in their program of study which would permit deeper immersion in domains such as renewable energy systems, systems modeling and analysis, product design, etc. Student interest in the programs has been very favorable. This paper describes the context at RIT from which the idea for these programs arose, the program development process that was followed, and the structure of the two programs.

1. Background

Efforts to reform engineering education over the past two decades have met with limited success. Although some engineering programs have effectively addressed a new vision for engineering pedagogy, the National Academy of Sciences [9] and the National Research Council [10, 11] have identified several problematic attributes in engineering education. In particular, engineering programs have been criticized for their inability to effectively integrate multiple engineering and non-engineering disciplines in solving today’s complex science and technology problems.

Nowhere is the appreciation of the technical and non-technical aspects of the engineering field more appropriate than in problem domains related to “sustainability”. Interest in sustainability and related issues continues to grow nationally as well as internationally. A sustainable economy is one that can meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs [13]. Moving an economy toward the goal of sustainability presents myriad challenges for all professions, especially business and engineering. As we move forward in the 21st century, the problems associated with delivering society’s goods and services using traditional, non-sustainable practices will become more apparent, and the value of more environmentally and socially responsible approaches to meeting society’s needs will become increasingly evident. Engineers and managers must be equipped to become environmental leaders and decision makers.

Thorn, B., & Carrano, A. (2008, June), Development Of Master’s Programs In Sustainable Engineering Paper presented at 2008 Annual Conference & Exposition, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. https://peer.asee.org/3736

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