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Development Of The Laboratory Based Course In Lean Six Sigma Nanomanufacturing

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Conference

2010 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Louisville, Kentucky

Publication Date

June 20, 2010

Start Date

June 20, 2010

End Date

June 23, 2010

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

15

Page Numbers

15.422.1 - 15.422.15

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/15936

Download Count

146

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Paper Authors

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Vladimir Genis Drexel University

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Michael Mauk Drexel University

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Yury Gogotsi Drexel University

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Dr. Yury Gogotsi — Professor of Materials Science & Engineering in Drexel’s College of Engineering and Director of the A.J. Drexel Nanotechnology Institute (DNI). Dr. Gogotsi’s research is focused on the fundamental and applied aspects of synthesis and characterization of carbon nanomaterials (nanotubes, nanodiamond and nanoporous carbons), ceramic nanoparticles (whiskers, nanowires, etc) and composites. Dr. Gogotsi has extensive experience with NSF-funded education and training programs including an IGERT Ph.D. training program and an RET teacher training program, both of which are focused on nanotechnology.

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Dhruv Sakalley Drexel University

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Dhruv Sakalley received a B. S. degree in engineering from Shri Govindram Sekseria Institute of Technology and Sciences, Indore, M.P., India in 2006. After graduation, he warked for Tata Consultancy Services, India as a Web applications developer. Currently, he is a PhD student in the School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems at Drexel University with a concentration in Neuroengineering. He is a research assistant in the School of Technology and Professional Studies working on the NSF grant titled “Development of the Laboratory-Based Course in Lean Six Sigma Nanomanufacturing”.

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James Hagarman Drexel University

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Dr. James Hagarman — Adjunct Professor at Goodwin College, modified and taught the Intro to Nanotechnology course over the last several years with an emphasis on Case Studies in emerging Nanotechnology applications. Dr. Hagarman worked in the Specialty Chemicals manufacturing field for 18 years as a technology and product manager in the area of sol-gel aqueous micro/nano solutions and powder products with the PQ Corporation and Emerson and Cummings Composite Materials (ECCM). Dr. Hagarman is trained in both Six Sigma and Lean Manufacturing principles.

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Holly Burnside Drexel University

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Holly Burnside received her M.S. degree in Science Communication and B.S. degree in Physics. Currently, she is a Director of Outreach and Development for the A.J. Drexel Nanotechnology Institute (DNI) at Drexel University. She manages federally funded professional development programs for high school and community college teachers, undergraduate and graduate students, focusing on nanoscale science and technology. She actively seeks funding and partnerships for science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education and outreach efforts of the DNI.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Development of a Laboratory-Based Course in Lean Six Sigma Nanomanufacturing

Abstract

We are developing a laboratory- and project-based Lean Six Sigma Nanomanufacturing course under an NSF Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement Grant, Type 1. The laboratory- and project-based course will teach Applied Engineering Technology (AET) students nanomanufacturing by combining hands-on nanotechnology laboratory experiments and Six Sigma analysis with lectures on Lean manufacturing principles and implementation. AET students will be introduced to nanotechnology principles, projects, and laboratory procedures by working with leading faculty members through classroom instruction, guest lectures, and field trips. During an 11-week term, the following laboratory projects will be implemented to simulate nanomanufacturing processes: production of CdSe quantum dots; electrodeposition of magnetic Ni nanowires; fabrication of organic LEDs; and fabrication of TiO2 nano solar cells. The laboratory experiments will be supported by various analytical techniques, such as fluorescence and electron microscopy; Raman and UV absorption spectroscopy; dynamic light scattering; optical transmission and reflection measurements; and atomic force microscopy, among others. Analysis techniques will generate suitable data sets for quality engineering and statistical process control using Lean Six Sigma methods. The course will be developed in the format of educational modules. Selected modules will become available to community colleges collaborating with Drexe University, as well as middle and high schools through outreach programs supported by the Drexel’s AET faculty and staff.

Introduction and Objectives

Lean Six Sigma approaches represent the state-of-the-art in manufacturing operations. The combined disciplines of Six Sigma Quality Management1-6 and Lean Operations7-9 can be applied to a nanotechnology laboratory - and project - based course to teach modern industrial engineering and quality control principles as applied to nanomanufacturing. The intended audience is Applied Engineering Technology (AET) students, as well as other undergraduate science, engineering, and technology majors. The course is comprised of laboratory tasks and projects to synthesize and characterize nanomaterials, such as quantum dots and nanowires; and to fabricate and evaluate nanoscale devices, such as nanocrystalline solar cells and organic LEDs. Laboratory projects simulate nanomanufacturing operations, and are structured in a Six Sigma framework, wherein methods of Six-Sigma Quality Assurance and Process Optimization are made an integral part of the course. The laboratory and its operation are organized on Lean Principles of production.

Our educational objectives are four-fold: 1. To introduce students to nanotechnology, including hands-on experience with synthesizing nanomaterials and fabricating nanodevices; 2. To instruct students in analytical methods to characterize, assess, and qualify these nanomaterials and devices; 3. To teach Six Sigma quality methods as applied to nanomaterials, processes, and devices;

Genis, V., & Mauk, M., & Gogotsi, Y., & Sakalley, D., & Hagarman, J., & Burnside, H. (2010, June), Development Of The Laboratory Based Course In Lean Six Sigma Nanomanufacturing Paper presented at 2010 Annual Conference & Exposition, Louisville, Kentucky. https://peer.asee.org/15936

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