Asee peer logo

Digitizing and Remediating Engineering Assessments: An Immersive and Transportable Faculty Development Workshop

Download Paper |

Conference

2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Columbus, Ohio

Publication Date

June 24, 2017

Start Date

June 24, 2017

End Date

June 28, 2017

Conference Session

CoED: Potpourri

Tagged Division

Computers in Education

Page Count

14

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/28182

Download Count

56

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Ronald F. DeMara P.E. University of Central Florida Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-6864-7255

visit author page

Ronald F. DeMara is a Professor in the College of Engineering and Computer Science (CECS) at the University of Central Florida with 24 years of experience in Electrical and Computer Engineering disciplines. His educational research interests focus on classroom and laboratory instructional technology, and the digitization of STEM assessments. He has completed over 200 technical and educational publications, 34 funded projects as PI/Co-I, and established two research laboratories. He serves as the founding Director of the Evaluation and Proficiency Center (EPC) in CECS, and is an iSTEM Fellow. He received the Joseph M. Bidenbach Outstanding Engineering Educator Award from IEEE in 2008.

visit author page

biography

Baiyun Chen University of Central Florida

visit author page

Dr. Baiyun Chen is an Instructional Designer at the Center for Distributed Learning at the University of Central Florida. She designs and delivers faculty professional development programs and teaches graduate courses on Instructional Systems Design. Her research interests focus on using instructional strategies in online and blended teaching and learning, professional development for teaching online, and application of emerging technologies in education. She has published 15 peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters and delivered more than 50 presentations at international and local conferences and event and served as the Co-Managing Editor of the Teaching Online Pedagogical Repository.

visit author page

biography

Richard Hartshorne University of Central Florida

visit author page

Richard Hartshorne is an Associate Professor and Coordinator for the Instructional Design & Technology program at the University of Central Florida (UCF). He earned his Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction with a focus on educational technology production and technology and teacher education from the University of Florida. Prior to his tenure at the UCF, Richard was an Assistant and Associate Professor of Instructional Systems Technology at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte for seven years and a physics instructor at Ed White High School in Jacksonville, FL for seven years. At the University of Central Florida, his teaching focuses on the integration of technology into the educational landscape, as well as instructional design and development. His research interests primarily involve the production and effective integration of instructional technology into the teaching and learning environment. The major areas of his research interest are rooted in technology and teacher education, the integration of emerging technology into the k-post-secondary curriculum, and online teaching and learning.

visit author page

biography

Ramtin Zand University of Central Florida

visit author page

Ramtin Zand received B.Sc. degree in Electrical Engineering in 2010 from Imam Khomeini International University, Qazvin, Iran. He also received his M.Sc. degree in Digital Electronics at Department of Electrical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, Iran, in 2012. He is currently working toward the Ph.D. degree in Computer Engineering at the University of Central Florida, Orlando, USA. His research interests are in Reconfigurable and Adaptive Computing Architectures with emphasis on Spintronic devices.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract

The design and delivery of effective digitization for formative and summative assessments that are suitable for computer-based exam delivery remains an open problem across engineering curricula. Engineering-specific exam digitization challenges include the need to adequately evaluate design skills, solution structure, intermediate work, creativity, conceptual understanding, and in many cases, rigor that exceed the capabilities of rote multiple choice formats. In our high-enrollment engineering program, we have developed, implemented, and evaluated a six-week cross-disciplinary Assessment Digitization Innovation (ADI) Workshop that supports engineering faculty interest in developing computer-based examinations that are responsive to best practices. Authentic assessment formats and topics of focus include incremental solutions, multiple answers, design-by-selection, declarative statement formats, and question cloning practices. Further, the remediation of computer-based exams using digitized formats also enables new opportunities to enhance learner engagement, metacognition, and soft skills, which are highly amenable to faculty edification and are integral faculty development components of the ADI Workshop.

The first ADI Workshop was conducted during the Summer 2016 semester. The experience included four face-to-face in-class sessions and two online modules. At the end of the 6-week program, each participating instructor showcased an online assessment that they had designed and developed as a result of the workshop. The topics of the pilot program included: 1) strategies to construct effective STEM assessments, 2) using relevant question types and features in Canvas, a learning management system (LMS), 3) implementing authentic assessment, 4) strategies to encourage academic integrity in online assessments, and 5) composing exemplar design vignette questions to reinforce connections between concepts to achieve integrative learning. The pilot cohort included 10 instructors and 16 Graduate Scholar Assistants (GSAs) currently teaching gateway Engineering and Computer Science courses at the University of Central Florida, and interacting with an estimated 6,200 undergraduate Engineering and Computer Science students. Upon conclusion of the program, anonymous feedback was collected from participating instructors, and was overwhelmingly positive. All respondents were “very satisfied” with the in-class sessions, the facilitators of the workshops, and the online modules. Specifically, they rated the program topics, examples, and resources provided to be highly relevant. The majority of the respondents agreed that the workshop will impact their future course design and development in beneficial ways, such as time-savings, convenience, student remediation, and the ability to serve large enrollments.

DeMara, R. F., & Chen, B., & Hartshorne, R., & Zand, R. (2017, June), Digitizing and Remediating Engineering Assessments: An Immersive and Transportable Faculty Development Workshop Paper presented at 2017 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Columbus, Ohio. https://peer.asee.org/28182

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2017 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015