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Doctoral degree completion in engineering in a Historically Black College and University

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Conference

2018 Mid Atlantic Section Fall Meeting

Location

Brooklyn Technical High School, Brooklyn, New York, New York

Publication Date

October 26, 2018

Start Date

October 26, 2018

End Date

October 27, 2018

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/31449

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Paper Authors

biography

Mohsen Mosleh Howard University

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Dr. M. Mosleh is a Professor of mechanical engineering, a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), an author and inventor, and the Campus representative for the American Society of Engineering Education at Howard University. His research area is surface and interface science and engineering with a focus on energy and manufacturing applications. Dr. Mosleh received his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He has extensively published in journals and conferences and produced patents. He is also the founder and director of the Surface Engineering and Nanofluids Laboratory (SENL) with the state-of-the-art nanofluid characterization and testing capabilities in the College of Engineering and Architecture.

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biography

Sonya T Smith Howard University

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Dr. Sonya T. Smith is a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers(ASME) and Principal Investigator for the Howard University ADVANCE-IT (HU ADVANCE-IT) award from the National Science Foundation. She joined the Howard University faculty in 1995 and is the first woman promoted to the highest academic rank of Professor (full) in the Department of Mechanical Engineering. She obtained her Ph.D. in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering from The University of Virginia (UVA) in 1995 and was also the first African-American woman to do so. Dr. Smith's personal goal is to be a mentor and resource to all students and young faculty/professionals, but especially to those underrepresented in STEM.

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Abstract

In a recent study by the Council of Graduate Schools (CGS) on minority attrition and completion in STEM doctoral degrees, it was suggested that “successful advisor-advisee relationships” is critical to successful outcomes. The study titled “Doctoral imitative on minority attrition and completion (DIMAC)”, however, did not define the specific attributes of a successful advisor-advisee relationship. In this paper, the results of a survey study on the role of mentoring attributes on the completion of Ph.D. degree by Underrepresented Minority (URM) students in engineering in a historically black college and university (HBCU) is presented. It was found that the median doctoral time-to-degree (TTD) of the URM students in engineering at the HBCU was several months shorter than that of URM students at Predominantly White Institutions (PWI) of higher education.

Mosleh, M., & Smith, S. T. (2018, October), Doctoral degree completion in engineering in a Historically Black College and University Paper presented at 2018 Mid Atlantic Section Fall Meeting, Brooklyn Technical High School, Brooklyn, New York, New York. https://peer.asee.org/31449

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