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Doctoral Level Studies For Engineering Technology Faculty

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Conference

2004 Annual Conference

Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Publication Date

June 20, 2004

Start Date

June 20, 2004

End Date

June 23, 2004

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Graduate Education in ET

Page Count

7

Page Numbers

9.479.1 - 9.479.7

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/13543

Download Count

16

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Paper Authors

author page

Venkitaswamy Raju

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

2650

Doctoral Level Studies for Engineering Technology Faculty V. Raju, Professor and Dean School of Engineering Technologies Farmingdale State University of New York, Farmingdale, NY 11735

Abstract

This paper reviews the growth of graduate level programs in engineering technology, identifies the need for doctoral level education for engineering technology faculty, and presents the mechanisms available for such an education. The paper presents case studies on three doctoral programs that are currently available for engineering technology educators. It discusses the curricular aspects of the programs, outlines the differences in their approach to learning and research, and promotes independent research and scholarly publications as an important means to an advanced degree in engineering technology.

Introduction

The doctoral level education has become an essential qualification for anyone interested in becoming an engineering technology faculty member. Although there are no doctoral level programs in engineering technology, producing graduates at the present time, the evolution in the field will soon lead to the establishment of new doctoral programs. At the present time, for those who are teaching in engineering technology and are interested in programs leading to doctorate degrees in a closely related field, there are three options: 1) follow a traditional path, which involves full time study of course work, and a dissertation in an engineering discipline, 2) join in a more flexible and yet structured program in technology management and complete the degree without major disruptions to one’s career, and 3) undertake a program that requires independent research and a thesis based on peer reviewed publications as the primary means to complete the degree. This paper identifies the need for doctoral level education in engineering technology and presents case studies on three of the doctoral degree programs currently available for engineering technology faculty. The paper does not deal with the traditional, course work based doctoral programs in science or engineering. It also does not deal with programs in such areas as education or other non-technical fields.

Proceedings of the 2004 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright © 2004, American Society for Engineering Education

Raju, V. (2004, June), Doctoral Level Studies For Engineering Technology Faculty Paper presented at 2004 Annual Conference, Salt Lake City, Utah. https://peer.asee.org/13543

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