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Educating Students To Manage Civil Infrastructure Systems

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Conference

2000 Annual Conference

Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Publication Date

June 18, 2000

Start Date

June 18, 2000

End Date

June 21, 2000

ISSN

2153-5965

Page Count

10

Page Numbers

5.246.1 - 5.246.10

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/8325

Download Count

24

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Paper Authors

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Pannapa Herabat

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Sue McNeil

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Adjo Amekudzi

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Kristen Sanford Bernhardt

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 2315

Educating Students to Manage Civil Infrastructure Systems

Adjo Amekudzi, Pannapa Herabat, Kristen L. Sanford Bernhardt, Sue McNeil Georgia Institute of Technology/Asian Institute of Technology/ University of Missouri-Columbia/University of Minnesota

Abstract

In spite of increasing infrastructure preservation and improvement needs, limited agency budgets, and public resistance to new construction, civil engineering education focuses almost exclusively on teaching students to design new facilities. Analytical ability and knowledge of design standards and approaches are necessary but not sufficient tools for managing civil infrastructure in the 21st century. Students must learn to integrate this traditional civil engineering knowledge base with an understanding of deterioration science, economics, finance, decision and management theory, maintenance management, and public policy. This paper describes efforts to address this gap in civil engineering education. The authors began with a single course at Carnegie Mellon University and have modified the original material in different ways to serve the needs at other institutions.

Introduction

Over the past twenty years, civil infrastructure has received considerable attention in the popular press as bridges collapse or are closed, underground pipes burst, and trains derail. However, gradual deterioration has a more significant impact than catastrophic failure on facility users as pavements crack and develop potholes, waterways collect silt, lock gates bow, railroad ties rot, and rails wear. Individual users are delayed or without services, shippers experience additional crew costs, and vehicles are damaged. The American Society of Civil Engineers’1998 Report Card for America's Infrastructure gave US infrastructure a failing grade1. Furthermore, limited budgets, the need to accommodate existing users, and the challenges of rebuilding infrastructure in constrained situations mean that a knowledge of engineering, economics, financing, new technologies, and analytical tools are critical to being able to address infrastructure problems effectively.

In spite of increasing infrastructure preservation and improvement needs, limited agency budgets, and public resistance to new construction, civil engineering education focuses almost exclusively on teaching students to design new facilities. Analytical ability and knowledge of design standards and approaches are necessary but not sufficient tools for managing civil infrastructure in the 21st century. Students must learn to integrate this traditional civil engineering knowledge base with an understanding of deterioration science, economics, finance, decision and management theory, maintenance management, and public policy. This paper describes efforts to address this gap in civil engineering education. The authors began with a single course at Carnegie Mellon University and have modified the original material in different

Herabat, P., & McNeil, S., & Amekudzi, A., & Sanford Bernhardt, K. (2000, June), Educating Students To Manage Civil Infrastructure Systems Paper presented at 2000 Annual Conference, St. Louis, Missouri. https://peer.asee.org/8325

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