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Effect of Implementation of JTF Engagement and Feedback Pedagogy On Faculty Beliefs and Practice and on Student Performance

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Conference

2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Seattle, Washington

Publication Date

June 14, 2015

Start Date

June 14, 2015

End Date

June 17, 2015

ISBN

978-0-692-50180-1

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

NSF Grantees’ Poster Session

Tagged Topic

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

14

Page Numbers

26.577.1 - 26.577.14

DOI

10.18260/p.23915

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/23915

Download Count

29

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Paper Authors

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Stephen J Krause Arizona State University

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Stephen Krause is professor in the Materials Science Program in the Fulton School of Engineering at Arizona State University. He teaches in the areas of introductory materials engineering, polymers and composites, and capstone design. His research interests include evaluating conceptual knowledge, misconceptions and technologies to promote conceptual change. He has co-developed a Materials Concept Inventory and a Chemistry Concept Inventory for assessing conceptual knowledge and change for introductory materials science and chemistry classes. He is currently conducting research on NSF projects in two areas. One is studying how strategies of engagement and feedback with support from internet tools and resources affect conceptual change and associated impact on students' attitude, achievement, and persistence. The other is on the factors that promote persistence and success in retention of undergraduate students in engineering. He was a coauthor for best paper award in the Journal of Engineering Education in 2013.

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Dale R Baker Arizona State University

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Dale Baker is a science educator, Her research focuses on equity issues as well as teaching and learning in science and engineering. She is a fellow of the American Educational Research Association and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She was the 2013 recipient of the NARST distinguished Contributions to Science Education Through Research award. This is the most prestigious award given by this international science education organization.

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Terry L. Alford Arizona State University

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Dr. Alford holds the rank of professor in the School for the Engineering of Matter, Transport, and Energy. He currently integrates JTF tools and concepts into his on-line course delivery.

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Casey Jane Ankeny Arizona State University

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Casey J. Ankeny, PhD is lecturer in the School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering at Arizona State University. Casey received her bachelor’s degree in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Virginia in 2006 and her doctorate degree in Biomedical Engineering from Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University in 2012 where she studied the role of shear stress in aortic valve disease. Currently, she is investigating cyber-based student engagement strategies in flipped and traditional biomedical engineering courses. She aspires to understand and improve student attitude, achievement, and persistence in student-centered courses.

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Adam R Carberry Arizona State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0003-0041-7060

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Dr. Adam Carberry is an assistant professor at Arizona State University in the Fulton Schools of Engineering Polytechnic School. He earned a B.S. in Materials Science Engineering from Alfred University, and received his M.S. and Ph.D., both from Tufts University, in Chemistry and Engineering Education respectively. Dr. Carberry was previously an employee of the Tufts’ Center for Engineering Education & Outreach and manager of the Student Teacher Outreach Mentorship Program (STOMP).

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Milo Koretsky Oregon State University

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Milo Koretsky is a Professor of Chemical Engineering at Oregon State University. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from UC San Diego and his Ph.D. from UC Berkeley, all in Chemical Engineering. He currently has research activity in areas related engineering education and is interested in integrating technology into effective educational practices and in promoting the use of higher-level cognitive skills in engineering problem solving. His research interests particularly focus on what prevents students from being able to integrate and extend the knowledge developed in specific courses in the core curriculum to the more complex, authentic problems and projects they face as professionals. Dr. Koretsky is one of the founding members of the Center for Lifelong STEM Education Research at OSU.

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Bill Jay Brooks Oregon State University

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Bill Brooks is a Postdoctoral Scholar in the School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering at Oregon State University. As an undergraduate he studied hardware, software, and chemical engineering. He ultimately received his Ph.D. from Oregon State University in Chemical Engineering. He is currently interested in the development of technology to study and promote STEM learning.

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Cindy Waters North Carolina A&T State University

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Dr. Cynthia Waters is an assistant professor in the Mechanical Engineering and she specializes in porous metals for biological and transportation applications, and engineering education. Dr. Waters’ research expertise is in the creation and characterization of metallic foams and porous metals for the future of applications ranging from space exploration to biomedical implants. These metals display a high density to strength ratio and improved ability for energy absorption, which leads to usefulness in many applications. She gets excited in a classroom whether introductory or advanced courses and she has been told that she can make a difficult concept seem easy and that her excitement is contagious Waters believes that we must become ‘facilitators of learning’. She works alongside the students to groom their own metacognative processes and help produce a lifelong learner. Several of her currently funded NSF grant deal with facets of engineering education. These include areas of assessment studies of classroom material science pedagogical implementations; case studies in various engineering disciplines and; engineering faculty barriers to adopt evidence-based (or nontraditional) teaching methods.

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Brady J. Gibbons Oregon State University

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Abstract

Effect of Implementation of JTF Engagement and Feedback Pedagogy On Faculty Pedagogical Content Knowledge and Student PerformanceJTF (Just-in-Time-Teaching with Interactive Frequent Formative Feedback) is an NSF TUESType 2 project with which is implementing student-centered pedagogy with eight instructors atfour collaborating institutions. Key features of the pedagogy are classroom engagement as wellas two way formative feedback to inform instructors of student learning issues so they can adjustinstruction and create adaptive resources to facilitate student learning. For instructors theanonymous student formative feedback opens for them a window on student thinking which canreveal learning issues such as misconceptions, skill gaps (like charting), difficult concepts,vocabulary ambiguities, etc. This helps instructors develop and build their pedagogical contentknowledge (PCK) so they can adjust their instruction and more effectively deliver content,concepts and skills in light of their reflective knowledge of students' means of understanding andlearning the material. With JTF engagement and feedback pedagogy instructors' attitudes andapproaches to teaching can shift and change their PCK with resultant change in pedagogy tomake instruction more effective which can be evidenced by improvements in studentperformance. As such, the research question addressed in this paper is, "What is the effect of JTFengagement and feedback pedagogy on teacher pedagogical content knowledge and associatedstudent performance."In the JTF collaborative project the eight faculty have been participating for the last three years.They have set up web-enabled daily or weekly formative feedback mechanisms for acquiring"Muddiest Point" student anonymous reflections through Blackboard or Concept Warehousesurvey tools. The instructors reflect on the responses and provide immediate feedback to studentsin the next class and/or via Blackboard postings. Results from a faculty Fall 2013 survey andfrom measures of student attitude, achievement, and persistence showed the following. Eight outof eight faculty said that in the last two years of using JTF pedagogy that their classroom practicehad "changed somewhat or changed significantly." One quote illustrating this change was, "Iteach using full engagement strategies.... previous classes were much more lecture-centric."Another question showed that seven of eight felt that their views about teaching had changed"somewhat or significantly." One quote illustrating this change was, "MP items are a powerfultool that shows a teacher where students are not understanding all information." The shift in theviews and actions of teachers also resulted in positive outcomes in student performance. Forstudent attitude, results from a Student Impact Value Survey (SIVS) showed positive results ofaverage 64% for Interest / Attainment Value and high values of 85% average of Utility Value,and also 84% agreeing that the cost of effort was low. Results for student persistence showedthat, across collaborating institutions, persistence was 97% for 227 students in four classes inFall 2013 and 95% for 311 students in five classes in Spring 2014. For student achievement, oneinstructor's final exam scores showed a shift in mean from 69% in Fall 2009 to 75% in Fall 2011to 79% in Fall 2013. This is a shift upward of a full letter grade over four years. Overall, thefaculty survey results and student performance outcomes demonstrate the effectiveness of JTFengagement and feedback pedagogy. There was positive change in faculty pedagogical contentknowledge that resulted in positive outcomes of student attitude, achievement and persistence.Additional results will be described, analyzed, and discussed in the full paper.

Krause, S. J., & Baker, D. R., & Alford, T. L., & Ankeny, C. J., & Carberry, A. R., & Koretsky, M., & Brooks, B. J., & Waters, C., & Gibbons, B. J. (2015, June), Effect of Implementation of JTF Engagement and Feedback Pedagogy On Faculty Beliefs and Practice and on Student Performance Paper presented at 2015 ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition, Seattle, Washington. 10.18260/p.23915

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