Asee peer logo

Electric Circuits Laboratory For Engineering Science

Download Paper |

Conference

2004 Annual Conference

Location

Salt Lake City, Utah

Publication Date

June 20, 2004

Start Date

June 20, 2004

End Date

June 23, 2004

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

NSF Grantees Poster Session

Page Count

9

Page Numbers

9.514.1 - 9.514.9

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/12745

Download Count

51

Request a correction

Paper Authors

author page

Mahmoud Ardebili

author page

Joel Hernandez

Download Paper |

Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Electr ic Cir cuits Labor ator y for an Engineer ing Science Cur r iculum

J oel Her nandez, Mahmoud Ar debili Bor ough of Manhattan Community College of CUNY, New Yor k, NY

I-Introduction:

The course Circuits and Systems I, taught in the Engineering Science Program at Borough of Manhattan Community College corresponds to a typical course taken by second year engineering students in the fields of Electrical, Mechanical and Chemical Engineering. The course is mostly concentrated in the analysis of DC Circuits and the time response of First and Second Order Circuits. This course had been taught for several years without any concurrent laboratory component due to a lack of funding to develop and implement a laboratory. This resulted in a separation between theory and reality, which produced lack of experimental skills and low motivation for the course, except among students intending to pursue a degree in Electrical Engineering. A NSF grant allowed us to develop a laboratory(1) that included experiments covering the majority of the contents taught in lecture(2). The experimental set-up included instruments that could be used both in stand-along as well as in PC-controlled mode. Students initially had challenging weeks learning circuit simulation software, developing proto-boarding skills, importing into and doing data processing with Matlab(3), and preparing reports. However, as the course progressed, they became more and more satisfied with their new learned skills and obtained a more solid understanding of the lecture material.

II-Contents in the laboratory manual:

The table of contents in the developed manual is shown below. Not all listed laboratory activities can be performed in a 14 weeks term, however, having extra activities is desirable for special projects and extra credit. OBJECTIVES INTRODUCTION DC INSTRUMENTATION AND ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS CIRCUIT SIMULATION AND DATA ANALYSIS SOFTWARE BASICS VOLTAGE AND CURRENT DIVISION EQUIVALENT CIRCUITS, KIRCHHOFF, NODE AND MESH ANALYSIS PROPORTIONALITY AND SUPERPOSITION THEVENIN AND NORTON THEOREMS MAXIMUM SIGNAL TRANSFER AND CIRCUIT INTERFACES DEPENDENT SOURCES TRANSISTORS SIGNAL WAVEFORMS AND AC INSTRUMENTATION SIGNAL SPECTRA OPERATIONAL AMPLIFIERS RC CIRCUIT TIME RESPONSE

Proceedings of the 2004 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference and Exposition Copyright © 2004, American Society for Engineering Education

Ardebili, M., & Hernandez, J. (2004, June), Electric Circuits Laboratory For Engineering Science Paper presented at 2004 Annual Conference, Salt Lake City, Utah. https://peer.asee.org/12745

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2004 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015