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Energy And Environmental Economics Core Course Sequence For An Interdisciplinary Engineering Science Doctoral Program

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Conference

2008 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Publication Date

June 22, 2008

Start Date

June 22, 2008

End Date

June 25, 2008

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Interdisciplinary Graduate Programs

Tagged Division

Graduate Studies

Page Count

13

Page Numbers

13.490.1 - 13.490.13

DOI

10.18260/1-2--4423

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/4423

Download Count

39

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Paper Authors

biography

Lyubov Kurkalova North Carolina A&T State University

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Lyubov Kurkalova is Associate Professor of Economics/Energy & Environment Ph.D. at North Carolina A&T State University. She has B.S. and M.S. degrees in Applied Mathematics and a Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics from Iowa State University. Her research experience is in production economics, econometrics, design of carbon sequestration policies, and economic and environmental trade-offs of expanded ethanol production.

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Keith Schimmel North Carolina A&T State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/https://0000-0002-4048-7250

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Keith Schimmel is Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering, Director of the Energy and Environmental Ph.D. program, and Director of Education and Outreach for the NOAA Interdisciplinary Scientific Environmental Technology Cooperative Science Center at North Carolina A&T State University. He received a B.S. degree in Chemical Engineering from Purdue University. He also holds M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Chemical Engineering from Northwestern University.

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Stephen Johnston North Carolina A&T State University

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Stephen Johnston is retired after more than thirty years working with the Research Triangle Institute (RTI), his last position being Director of RTI’s Public Utility Economics program. He received a B.S. degree in Nuclear Engineering and a Ph.D. in Economics with a minor in Nuclear Engineering from North Carolina State University. He coauthored the book Electric Utility Load Management, serves on the Board of Directors of North Carolina Green Power, and serves as an Adjunct Professor at North Carolina A&T State University in the Energy & Environmental Ph.D. Program.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Energy and Environmental Economics Core Course Sequence for an Interdisciplinary Engineering Science Doctoral Program

Abstract An innovative feature of the Energy & Environmental Ph.D. Program at North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University is a two course sequence in energy and environmental economics. The objective of these core courses is to provide engineering science doctoral students with economics tools that they can use in their dissertations and throughout their careers in analyzing new energy and environmental technologies. The first course, Theory and Practice of Energy and Environmental Economic Policy Analysis, provides the economic framework necessary for analyzing energy and environmental issues. Microeconomic and macroeconomic principles and analytical techniques relevant to the analysis of energy markets and environmental protection are covered. Current energy and environmental regulatory systems at the state, national, and international levels are presented. The second course, Application of Energy and Environmental Economic Policy Analysis, provides the quantitative economic techniques necessary for analyzing energy and environmental projects and issues. The course covers engineering economics techniques for energy project valuation and econometric techniques used in forecasting the supply of and the demand for energy and environmental services. Presented herein are details of the content and methods utilized in the courses and student feedback on them.

Introduction The Energy & Environmental (EES) Ph.D. program is a new interdisciplinary graduate program at North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University that is now in its third year of operation.1 It has a current student body of eighteen students with its first graduate having graduated during fall 2007. The disciplinary backgrounds of the students include chemical engineering, mechanical engineering, civil and environmental engineering, electrical engineering, environmental science, applied mathematics, chemistry, physics, biology, and agricultural economics. A feature of the program that was incorporated into its initial design is a thread of exposure to energy and environmental economics. The rationale for inclusion of this thread included (1) to provide a vehicle for interdisciplinary conversations among students with a variety of engineering and physical science backgrounds, (2) to respond to numerous reports of the need for engineering graduates with strong technical skills as well as a broader education, and (3) to emphasize to students that energy and environmental technology decisions are driven by economic considerations.

The two course sequence EES 810 (Theory and Practice of Energy and Environmental Economic Policy Analysis) and EES 811 (Application of Energy and Environmental Economic Policy Analysis) are the starting point for the thread of economic analysis that runs throughout the EES course of study. This part of the EES curriculum is designed to provide students with some basic economic analysis tools that can be used throughout their career to analyze energy and environmental technologies not just in terms of technology issues but also in terms of economic and regulatory issues. EES 810 and EES 811 are required core courses that are taken during the first two semesters in the EES program. Material from the courses is included in the written qualifying exam that students take at the end of their first year of study. Additional

Kurkalova, L., & Schimmel, K., & Johnston, S. (2008, June), Energy And Environmental Economics Core Course Sequence For An Interdisciplinary Engineering Science Doctoral Program Paper presented at 2008 Annual Conference & Exposition, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 10.18260/1-2--4423

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