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Engaging Undergraduate Students in Research: Efficient Logic Design in Nano-Scale using Spin Transfer Torque Memory Technology

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Conference

2017 Pacific Southwest Section Meeting

Location

Tempe, Arizona

Publication Date

April 20, 2017

Start Date

April 20, 2017

End Date

April 22, 2017

Conference Session

Technical Session 3b

Tagged Topic

Pacific Southwest Section

Page Count

22

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/29216

Download Count

47

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Paper Authors

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Brandon J Leung San Jose State University

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Brandon Leung is currently a junior at San Jose State University in San Jose, CA, majoring in Electrical Engineering. His research interests include power engineering and nanotechnology.

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Yuting Huang Canada College

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Affiliation/Organization: Cañada College in Redwood City, CA.
Biography: Yuting Huang is currently a junior at university of Cañada College. She is majoring in Aerospace Engineering and will be transferring to upper division in fall 2017. Her passion in science and space is what drives her to study aerospace engineering, which is the field she hopes to pursue as a career.

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Fernando lorenzo

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Sergio Rodriguez-Reyes San Jose State University

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Sergio Rodriguez-Reyes is third year student at San Jose State University working towarsd a BS degree in Elecrtrical Engineering. He has a strong interest in nano technology and circuit design.

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Janine Criselda L. Young University of California, Berkeley

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Janine Young is currently a junior at UC Berkeley, majoring in Chemical Engineering. Her research interests include materials chemistry, nanotechnology, and renewable energy.

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ali attaran

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Amelito G Enriquez Canada College Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0002-1259-0680

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Amelito Enriquez is a professor of Engineering and Mathematics at Cañada College in Redwood City, CA. He received a BS in Geodetic Engineering from the University of the Philippines, his MS in Geodetic Science from the Ohio State University, and his PhD in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California, Irvine. His research interests include technology-enhanced instruction and increasing the representation of female, minority and other underrepresented groups in mathematics, science and engineering.

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Cheng Chen San Francisco State University

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Dr. Cheng Chen is currently an associate professor in the school of engineering at San Francisco State University. His research interests include earthquake engineering, structural reliability and fire structural engineering.

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Zhaoshuo Jiang P.E. San Francisco State University

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Prof. Jiang graduated from the University of Connecticut with a Ph.D. degree in Civil Engineering. Before joining San Francisco State University as an assistant professor, he worked for Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM) LLP. As a licensed professional engineer in the states of Connecticut and California, Dr. Jiang has been involved in the design of a variety of low-rise and high-rise projects. His current research interests mainly focus on Smart Structures Technology, Structural Control and Health Monitoring and Innovative Engineering Education.

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Wenshen Pong P.E. San Francisco State University

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Wenshen Pong received his Ph.D. in Structural Engineering from the State University of New York at Buffalo. He joined the School of Engineering at San Francisco State University in 1998. He teaches courses in Civil/Structural Engineering.

Dr. Pong is a registered Professional Engineer in California. He is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers and the Structural Engineers Association of California. He has published over fifty technical papers in the areas of Structural Control and Earthquake Engineering. Dr. Pong has been the Director of the School of Engineering at SFSU with 20 full-time faculty and over 25 part-time faculty since 2009.

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Hamid Shahnasser San Francisco State University

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Hamid Shahnasser received the B.E. degree in electrical engineering from McGill University, Montreal, MS degree in electrical and computer engineering from Carnegie-Mellon University and his Ph.D. from Drexel University Pennsylvania.

He is currently a professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at San Francisco State University and the Engineering graduate program coordinator. His areas of interest are communication networks and computer systems. Dr. Shahnasser has been a research faculty consultant to NASA Ames Research Center projects since 1990 and has collaborated on several research grants with that organization since then. He has received grants from NSA, Department of Education, National Science Foundation and various private companies carrying out research in the areas of his interest.

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Kwok Siong Teh San Francisco State University

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Kwok Siong Teh received his B.S., M.S., Ph.D. degrees in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, and University of California at Berkeley in 1997, 2001, and 2004, respectively. He is currently an associate professor of mechanical engineering, as well as the Associate Director of the School of Engineering at San Francisco State University. His primary research interests are in the direct synthesis, characterization, and applications of nanocomposites and nanostructures for energy generation and storage.

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Xiaorong Zhang San Francisco State University

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Xiaorong Zhang received the B.S. degree in computer science from Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China, in 2006, the M.S. and the Ph.D. degrees in computer engineering from University of Rhode Island, Kingston, in 2009 and 2013 respectively. She is currently an Assistant Professor in the School of Engineering at San Francisco State University. Her research interests include embedded systems, wearable technologies, neural-machine interface, and cyber-physical systems.

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Hamid Mahmoodi San Francisco State University

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Hamid Mahmoodi received his Ph.D. degree in electrical and computer engineering from Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, in 2005. He is currently a professor of electrical and computer engineering in the School of Engineering at San Francisco State University. His research interests include low-power, reliable, and high-performance circuit design in nano-electronic technologies. He has published more than one hundred technical papers in journals and conferences and holds five U.S. patents. He was a co-recipient of the 2008 SRC Inventor Recognition Award, the 2006 IEEE Circuits and Systems Society VLSI Transactions Best Paper Award, 2005 SRC Technical Excellence Award, and the Best Paper Award of the 2004 International Conference on Computer Design. He has served on technical program committees of Custom Integrated Circuits Conference, International Symposium on Low Power Electronics Design, and International Symposium on Quality Electronics Design.

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Abstract

Research experience is enriching and inspiring for undergraduate students. Research experiences on advanced technologies are far from reach in undergraduate level studies. In this paper, we present an approach to address this gap via summer research opportunities for undergraduate students. The internship is planned over 10 weeks, and the student interns are assigned a graduate student mentor and a faculty advisor. This paper presents the details of the project, research and educational objectives, results obtained, and the student surveys assessing the outcomes. The planned research project is related to the Spin Transfer Torque (STT) Magnetic RAM (STTMRAM), which is a promising technology for information storage. In this technology, the information is stored in a magnetic form that is non-volatile and also much more scalable as compared to the existing charge based storage technologies such as SRAM, DRAM, and flash. The main target application of STTMRAM is for storage and the main targeted market is replacement of DRAM main memory and SRAM cache. In this research, we propose a unique application for STTMRAM and that is to realize reconfigurable logic using Look-Up Table (LUT) based logic implementation in which the LUTs are implemented using STTMRAM technology. The results of student surveys on the experience of student participants with the research internship strongly suggest that such an experience is very valuable in helping the students decide if they want to purse STEM research careers. Moreover, this experience enhances students’ technical research skills such as scientific thinking, ability to analyze and interpret results, and presentation skills.

Leung, B. J., & Huang, Y., & lorenzo, F., & Rodriguez-Reyes, S., & Young, J. C. L., & attaran, A., & Enriquez, A. G., & Chen, C., & Jiang, Z., & Pong, W., & Shahnasser, H., & Teh, K. S., & Zhang, X., & Mahmoodi, H. (2017, April), Engaging Undergraduate Students in Research: Efficient Logic Design in Nano-Scale using Spin Transfer Torque Memory Technology Paper presented at 2017 Pacific Southwest Section Meeting, Tempe, Arizona. https://peer.asee.org/29216

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