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Engineering A Traditional English Department: Writing Instruction And The Role Of Freshman English

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Conference

2003 Annual Conference

Location

Nashville, Tennessee

Publication Date

June 22, 2003

Start Date

June 22, 2003

End Date

June 25, 2003

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

ASEE Multimedia Session

Page Count

9

Page Numbers

8.490.1 - 8.490.9

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/11709

Download Count

22

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Paper Authors

author page

Nicole Amare

author page

Charlotte Brammer

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Session 2793

Engineering a Traditional English Department: Writing Instruction and the Role of Freshman English

Nicole Amare, Charlotte Brammer The University of South Alabama/The University of Alabama

Abstract

This paper discusses the results of collaborative efforts to create a writing course across the disciplines for TIDE (Teaming, Integration, & Design in Engineering) students in traditional composition classes. In the fall 1999 semester, the engineering department at the University of Alabama developed a TIDE curriculum in an effort to assist incoming engineering freshmen and to retain more engineering majors. Students in the TIDE curriculum were immediately placed in cohort groups, which allowed them to take all four core classes their first semester (English, chemistry, calculus, and engineering) with the same faculty and group of students. English instructors were hired to teach Composition 101-F sections that consisted exclusively or predominantly of engineering majors. The goal of these EH 101-F sections was to encourage Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) principles to improve students’ writing for future disciplinary work and for industry.

There were numerous obstacles and successes involved in the cross-disciplinary efforts to develop and teach an engineering cohort within a traditional English department. However, this paper will show that, according to both students and faculty, the results of this collaborative effort were positive. Recommendations for engineering faculty working at universities with traditional writing programs are given.

Introduction

In the fall semester of 1999, the engineering department at the University of Alabama developed a TIDE (Teaming, Integration, & Design in Engineering) curriculum in an effort to assist incoming engineering freshmen and to retain more engineering majors. One component of the TIDE curriculum was the creation of cohort scheduling, or the same group of students taking their four core classes together: English, chemistry, calculus, and engineering. The TIDE program is part of a group called the Foundation Coalition or FC. FC is a National Science Foundation (NSF) sponsored initiative coalition program that funds reform in undergraduate engineering education and consists of students and faculty working together to improve education for and university retention of engineering students. Although the TIDE program had previously collaborated with the math and chemistry departments in 1995, 1999 was the first year that English faculty members were included. The goal for including English faculty, however, was multifarious; yes, it was hoped that engineering students would benefit from the cohort scheduling, but it was also believed that creating EH 101 sections of solely or primarily engineering students might encourage the

Proceedings of the 2003 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright ©2003, American Society for Engineering Education

Amare, N., & Brammer, C. (2003, June), Engineering A Traditional English Department: Writing Instruction And The Role Of Freshman English Paper presented at 2003 Annual Conference, Nashville, Tennessee. https://peer.asee.org/11709

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