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Engineering Education And The Global Economy: The Search For Policy

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Conference

2006 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Chicago, Illinois

Publication Date

June 18, 2006

Start Date

June 18, 2006

End Date

June 21, 2006

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Topical Public Policy Issues

Tagged Division

Engineering and Public Policy

Page Count

18

Page Numbers

11.551.1 - 11.551.18

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/1062

Download Count

17

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Paper Authors

biography

Richard Devon Pennsylvania State University

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Devon is Professor of Engineering Design and the Director of the Engineering Design Program in the School for Engineering Design, Technology, and Professional Programs at The Pennsylvania State University, where he has received several teaching awards. He has directed both the Pennsylvania Space Grant Program and the Science, Technology, and Society Program at Penn State. Devon currently focuses on design education, global programs, and design topics such as design ethics, innovative design, and conceptual design communications.

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Elizabeth Kisenwether Pennsylvania State University

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Kisenwether is an electrical engineer with degrees from Penn State University, MIT, and Johns Hopkins University. She is an Assistant Professor and the Director of the Engineering Entrepreneurship Program with more than a decade in professional practice, including many years running a successful start up company, Paragon Technology. Kisenwether is the immediate Past-Chair of the rapidly growing Entrepreneurship Division of ASEE, and she is funded for educational research and development by both GE and the Kauffman Foundation.

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Richard Schuhmann Pennsylvania State University

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Schuhmann is an Assistant Professor with more than 8 years of teaching experience including courses in environmental engineering, entrepreneurship, and leadership. He is the Director of the Engineering Leadership Program and an adjunct Assistant Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Outside of the university, Schuhmann worked as a marine geophysicist, underwater archaeologist, and wooden boat builder before becoming an engineer; he now consults with citizens groups and law firms regarding environmental issues.

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Robert Pangborn Pennsylvania State University

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Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies and International Programs in the College of Engineering. Professor of Material Science. In February 2006, Dr Pangborn will become the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Programs for Penn State

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Kim Barron Pennsylvania State University

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Kim Barron is a graduate student in Industrial Engineering at Penn State. Kim has a Bachelor's degree from Penn State in Industrial Engineering.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Engineering Education and the Global Economy: The Search for Policy Abstract Engineering education in the United States is confronted with some new realities, both real and perceived. Engineering is increasingly a globally distributed, cooperative activity and the US outsourcing of research, design, manufacturing, and construction overseas is growing. Further, the production of engineers in the United States is falling to around 5-6% of the global supply with clear signs that engineering education is available at lower costs, often far lower, in other countries. Many have viewed this globalization as a competitive situation for engineering education in the United States that we are losing.

We will present the view that in terms of the quality of engineering education (which engineering educators can influence) as opposed to the global economy (about which we can do little), engineering education is still very strong in the US and likely to remain that way. However, we will present some recommendations based on our professional responsibilities in running programs in entrepreneurship, leadership, and design. In particular, we will review survey data collected from Penn State engineering graduates over the last decade which helps define new paths for integrating entrepreneurship, leadership and design into the engineering curriculum. We believe that there are some very real ways in which engineering education can, and should be, responding to the new requirements for success in professional engineering careers that derive from national needs as well as from the globalization of engineering.

Introduction: Engineering Education in a Global Context1 There are many different views of globalization and its significance. For example, in the forthcoming book, Global Tectonics, Ghadar and Peterson identify 12 major changes at work: population, urbanization, disease and globalization, resource management, environmental degradation, economic integration, knowledge dissemination, information technology, biotechnology, nanotechnology, conflict, and governance.2 This list, in turn, is an expansion of the “Seven Revolutions” previously presented by the Global Strategy Institute of the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS): population; resource management and environmental stewardship; technological innovation and diffusion; the development and dissemination of information of knowledge; economic integration, the nature and mode of conflict, and the challenges of governance.3 In their convincing representation, the world is changing rapidly and in many ways that can affect engineering and engineering education. However, naming fields like nanotechnology and biotechnology appears to name strengths not weaknesses of the U.S.

Nevertheless, there are signs that many in the engineering education community in the United States are becoming alarmed about the growing strengths of competitors in the global economy, particularly in Asia. For example, a recent report by the National Academy of Engineering, The Engineer of 2020, stresses the impact of globalization on the practice of engineering and the need for U.S. engineers to focus on innovative and creative aspects of the profession to be globally competitive.4 This concern is being taken further with the new NAE report Rising Above the Gathering Storm, 5 the name apparently being a reference to the 2002 movie about Churchill’s prescience about the emerging war threat prior to World War II. ASEE and Design News have

Devon, R., & Kisenwether, E., & Schuhmann, R., & Pangborn, R., & Barron, K. (2006, June), Engineering Education And The Global Economy: The Search For Policy Paper presented at 2006 Annual Conference & Exposition, Chicago, Illinois. https://peer.asee.org/1062

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2006 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015