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Engineering Education Opportunities In The National Science Foundation's Division Of Undergraduate Education's Programs

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Conference

2005 Annual Conference

Location

Portland, Oregon

Publication Date

June 12, 2005

Start Date

June 12, 2005

End Date

June 15, 2005

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

NSF Funding for Educational Scholarship

Page Count

8

Page Numbers

10.542.1 - 10.542.8

DOI

10.18260/1-2--15300

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/15300

Download Count

151

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Paper Authors

author page

Russ Pimmel

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Programs for Engineering Education in the National Science Foundation's Division of Undergraduate Education ∗

Russell Pimmel Program Director Division of Undergraduate Education National Science Foundation

Abstract

The programs of the Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) serve as the focal point for the National Science Foundation’s efforts in undergraduate education. These programs are directed at strengthening the vitality of undergraduate science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education for all students. DUE has a number of different programs, each with a scope and objectives that address specific issues in undergraduate education and some are particularly applicable to engineering education. The paper presents a brief summary of these programs and a reference to a complete description. One of these programs, the Course, Curriculum and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) Program, which plays a prominent role in supporting research and development of engineering education, was revised this year and this paper discusses these changes.

Introduction

The Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) serves as the focal point for the National Science Foundation’s efforts in undergraduate education in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). DUE programs are designed to strengthen the vitality of STEM education in a variety of ways with the Course, Curriculum and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) Program playing a prominent role in supporting research and development of engineering education. Most of DUE's programs have been in place for a few years and the first part of this paper provides a brief summary of each. The CCLI program has undergone a major review this year so that the 2005 solicitation (NSF 05-559) is substantially different from last year's. 1 The second part of this paper discusses the rationale for and direction of these changes.

Overview of DUE's Programs

The following paragraphs, which have been adapted from various NSF documents, briefly describe all of our programs with the exception of the CCLI program – it is dealt with in the subsequent sections of the paper. Additional information about all DUE programs can be found on our website. 2

∗ This paper represents the opinion of the author and not an official NSF policy. “Proceedings of the 2005 American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference & Exposition Copyright  2005, American Society for Engineering Education”

Pimmel, R. (2005, June), Engineering Education Opportunities In The National Science Foundation's Division Of Undergraduate Education's Programs Paper presented at 2005 Annual Conference, Portland, Oregon. 10.18260/1-2--15300

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