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Engineering Experiments Utilizing An Automated Breadmaker

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Conference

2001 Annual Conference

Location

Albuquerque, New Mexico

Publication Date

June 24, 2001

Start Date

June 24, 2001

End Date

June 27, 2001

ISSN

2153-5965

Page Count

18

Page Numbers

6.433.1 - 6.433.18

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/9195

Download Count

219

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Paper Authors

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Carol Flynn

author page

Robert Hesketh

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C. Stewart Slater

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

2213

Engineering Experiments Utilizing an Automated Breadmaker By Robert P. Hesketh, C. Stewart Slater, and Carol Rea Flynn, Chemical Engineering, Rowan University, Glassboro NJ 08028-1701 Prepared for 2001 ASEE Annual Conference Session 2213, June 26, 2001

Breadmaking is a technology with a long history, starting with the Egyptians baking loaves of bread over 6000 years ago. Since then, the process of bread making has become fully automated through the use of bulk transportation of ingredients, large mechanical mixers, conveyors, environmentally controlled proofing chambers, high efficiency ovens, cutters, and packaging equipment. This process of bread making can be classified into several unit operations including particle transport, mixing, fermentation, and baking. This industrial process has been fully automated in the relatively new bench top breadmaking machines. At Rowan we have used breadmaking machines for a number of experiments starting with freshman level mass balances, reverse engineering, data acquisition, to upper level heat transfer, biochemical reactions, and mixing. These relatively modest priced machines also have the added advantage of filling the laboratory with the ever pleasing aroma baking bread!

This paper contains descriptions of the experiments that have been conducted with breadmakers and presents methods for incorporation of these ideas into existing engineering courses.

Purpose: The breadmaker uses many chemical engineering principles. Data acquisition, which is useful to anybody in engineering, and can be taught at a freshmen level, heat transfer, which can be done at a junior level, and many others that we will not discuss here. In this workshop we will show you experiments starting from a freshman level data acquisition, to juniors level heat and mass transfer.

Background:

Introduction The Egyptians made the first loaves of bread over 6000 years ago. Since then, the process of bread making has become fully automated through the use of bulk transportation of ingredients, large mechanical mixers, conveyors, environmentally controlled proofing chambers, high efficiency ovens, cutters, and packaging equipment. The process of bread making can be separated into a series of unit operations – transportation of materials, mixing, fermentation, and baking. Each unit operation has mechanical / electrical function and/or chemical reactions associated with the unit operation.

Flynn, C., & Hesketh, R., & Slater, C. S. (2001, June), Engineering Experiments Utilizing An Automated Breadmaker Paper presented at 2001 Annual Conference, Albuquerque, New Mexico. https://peer.asee.org/9195

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