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Engineering Solutions to Storm Water Problems Through Community Participation

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Conference

2015 ASEE Workshop on K-12 Engineering Education

Location

Seattle, Washington

Publication Date

June 13, 2015

Start Date

June 13, 2015

End Date

June 13, 2015

Page Count

18

Page Numbers

18.14.1 - 18.14.18

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https://peer.asee.org/17109

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75

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Mohamad Musavi University of Maine

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Mohamad Musavi is the Associate Dean of the College of Engineering at the University of Maine. Previously, he was the Chair and a Professor of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department. He is the Principal Investigator of a NSF-EPSCoR award to engage secondary school students and teachers, especially female and minority students, in innovative engineering solutions to storm water. He has been working with Maine high schools in the developing and establishing STEM academies.

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Cary Edward James Bangor High School

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Mr. Cary James has a BS in chemistry and an MS in Plant Pathology. He has received numerous teaching awards including the Siemens Award for Advanced Placement Teacher of the Year for Maine 2009, Pulp and Paper Foundation Maine Teacher Award 2009, New England Institute of Chemistry Maine State Teacher Award 2011, New England Water Environmental Association Public Educator Award 2013, and has received the Francis Crowe Society Honorary Engineering Degree from the University of Maine 2010. Recently he presented a lecture on High School Students as Water Researchers at the Climate Change and the Future of Water Conference in Abu Dhabi. His students have excelled in many national and international level science competitions including the 2010 National Stockholm Junior Water Prize (SJWP) winner and the 2011 Bjorn von Euler Innovation in Water Scholarship winner. Both students represented the United States at the International SJWP in Stockholm Sweden. Mr. James has a passion for improving the quality of water for people in developing countries and has focused student research on water sanitation and conservation. In the classroom he works to differentiate instruction for students using an evidenced based inquiry approach.

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Ali Abedi University of Maine

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Ali Abedi is Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at UMaine. His research includes performance evaluation of channel codes and wireless sensing for aerospace and biomedical applications. Dr. Abedi has several years of industry experience before entering Academia, working as telecom consultant and project manager at TEC and ISC Corporations. He is Co-founder of two startup companies, and author/Co-author of over 80 publications including 4 books and 2 patents.

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Abstract

WORKSHOP PROPOSAL FORM 2015 Annual ASEE K-12 Workshop on Engineering Education “Authentic Engineering: Representing & Emphasizing the E in STEM” Presented by Dassault Systems Saturday, June 13, 2015 8:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. Sheraton Seattle | Seattle | WAPlease complete this form, save it as a PDF file only and upload it through the ASEE PaperManagement system as shown in the K12 Workshop Presenter’s Kit.All notifications will be by email from the ASEE Paper Management system.NOTE: To ensure that emails are not obstructed by spam blockers, please make sure to WHITELIST theemail addresses: monolith@asee.org and conferences@asee.org and s.harrington-hurd@asee.org.Direct questions to Stephanie Harrington-Hurd, ASEE K-12 Activities Manager, at s.harrington-hurd@asee.org. Additional workshop details are available at: http://www.asee.org/K12Workshop.Thank you! Deadline Friday, January 23, 2015 by 5:00PM EST Presenters will be notified of acceptance status by March 14. Late submissions will not be accepted. Advanced Workshop Registration will open December 6, 2013. SUBMISSION INFORMATIONProvide the first and last name of each presenter, including affiliations. If there is more than onepresenter, designate one person as the organizer and provide only that person’s contactinformation. The organizer is responsible for communicating to co-presenters.Number of Presenters: 3Presenter Name(s):1) Last Musavi First Mohamad Affiliation University of Maine, Associate Dean,College of Engineering2) Last Abedi First Ali Affiliation University of Maine, Associate Professor of Electricaland Computer Engineering3) Last James First Cary Affiliation Bangor High School, Director of Science DepartmentContact Person’s Name: Mohamad MusaviContact Person’s Email: musavi@maine.edu2015-ASEE-K12-Proposal-Form Musavi (1).docxPage 1 of 17 WORKSHOP PROPOSAL FORM 2015 Annual ASEE K-12 Workshop on Engineering Education “Authentic Engineering: Representing & Emphasizing the E in STEM” Presented by Dassault Systems Saturday, June 13, 2015 8:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. Sheraton Seattle | Seattle | WAContact Person’s Phone: 207-581-2218Contact Person’s Alternate Phone: 207-659-4470Please provide a one-paragraph bio for each presenter (in the order listed above). The bio shouldnot exceed 70 words and should be written as you would want it to appear on the ASEE websiteand program materials.1) Mohamad Musavi is the Associate Dean of the College of Engineering at the University of Maine. Previously, he was the Chair and a Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering Department. He is the Principal Investigator of a NSF-EPSCoR award to engage secondary school students and teachers, especially female and minority students, in innovative engineering solutions to storm water. He is working with Maine high schools in the implementation of STEM academies.2) Cary James is the STEM Director at Bangor High School in Bangor, Maine. He is interested in improving the quality of water for people in developing countries and has focused student research on water sanitation and conservation. His students have excelled in many national and international level competitions including the 2010 National Stockholm Junior Water Prize (SJWP) winner and the 2011 Bjorn von Euler Innovation in Water Scholarship winner3) Ali Abedi is Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at UMaine. His research includes performance evaluation of channel codes and wireless sensing for aerospace and biomedical applications. Dr. Abedi has several years of industry experience before entering Academia, working as telecom consultant and project manager at TEC and ISC Corporations. He is Co-founder of two startup companies, and author/Co-author of over 80 publications including 4 books and 2 patents. WORKSHOP INFORMATIONProposed Title:Engineering Solutions to Storm Water Problems Through Community ParticipationAbstract: Please provide a concise description that includes the workshop’s learning objectives(maximum 750 characters). The abstract is used on the ASEE website, program materials, andotherK-12 Workshop promotional activities.The objective of this workshop is to introduce teachers and engineers to a learning model that empowershigh school students, especially female and minorities, to create innovative solutions to a pervasiveenvironmental problem: storm water. This model is based on the implementation of a NSF-EPSCoRfunded project by the University of Maine faculty and teachers and students in several Maine highschools. The learning model actively engages students with STEM professionals in an inquiry and projectbased instructional environment. Using the latest sensor technology for data collection and computer2015-ASEE-K12-Proposal-Form Musavi (1).docxPage 2 of 17 WORKSHOP PROPOSAL FORM 2015 Annual ASEE K-12 Workshop on Engineering Education “Authentic Engineering: Representing & Emphasizing the E in STEM” Presented by Dassault Systems Saturday, June 13, 2015 8:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. Sheraton Seattle | Seattle | WAmodeling for data analysis, students will address the widespread problem of storm water management.Students will monitor and map water quality around their communities and investigate innovativesolutions to local storm water issues. Storm water runoff is a pressing and expensive problem, and themodel presented in this workshop will have nation-wide applicability and appeal.The workshop presents the participants with the instructions and activities for engaging students inscience and engineering of storm water and integration on these activities in high school curriculumbased on the recommendation of the Framework and Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS).These include: (1) Stationary water quality wireless sensor network units with microprocessor boards, (2)Students acting as Live Sensors in their communities, collecting real-time data via probes and sampling,(3) Learn to manage and use storm water data through lab analysis, dynamic online mapping andmodeling tools, and direct involvement with staff at their respective water districts, (4) Investigatingsolutions to storm water problems, and (5) Participating in public outreach activities.This highly hands-on learning model involves numerous STEM areas, including: engineering design,science, computer modeling, and information technology; therefore, satisfying many NGSS requirements,especially those related to the “science and engineering practices” core value. With its focus oninvestigating and improving water quality, this model will attract a diversity of individuals and communityentities, including females, Native Americans, African Americans and rural high school students andteachers. In addition to attracting female and minorities to STEM education, the significant role of stormwater in health of our environment and economy is a strong motivation for government, non-profit and for-profit organizations to support this learning model in their communities and assist in the sustainability ofthe project.Important learning outcomes of this learning model would include: (1) advancing the knowledge of adiversity of students and teachers in STEM through a novel educational and technological strategy; (2)new watershed maps and management plans for numerous impaired streams leading to improved waterquality; and (3) transfer of new student and teacher knowledge to middle schools and the public viastudent-created outreach programs.Intellectual Merit: By offering a highly active and transformational educationalexperience to both teachers and students, this learning model will expand understanding of ourenvironment and how to most effectively address critical problems using engineering and sciencesolutions. Engaging a highly diverse group of participants will increase our understanding of effectivecommunity inclusive learning methods.Workshop Description. Please provide a detailed description of the proposed workshop that, atminimum, explicitly addresses the following (maximum 4,000 characters): a. Learning objectives b. Hands-on activities and interactive exercises c. Materials that participants can take with them d. Practical application for teachers and outreach staffI. Learning ObjectivesThe overall goal of this workshop is to share the successful implementation of a project basededucational model for engaging female and minority students, and diverse community groups inengineering and sciences and enable them to implement the model in their schools and communities.The educational objectives of this learning model are to enable high school teacher to:2015-ASEE-K12-Proposal-Form Musavi (1).docxPage 3 of 17 WORKSHOP PROPOSAL FORM 2015 Annual ASEE K-12 Workshop on Engineering Education “Authentic Engineering: Representing & Emphasizing the E in STEM” Presented by Dassault Systems Saturday, June 13, 2015 8:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. Sheraton Seattle | Seattle | WA 1. Provide project based educational opportunities using emerging engineering technologies for students in high schools. 2. Promote interest in STEM education and careers for females and minorities. 3. Increase awareness and knowledge of the problem of storm water, and find solutions by connecting and empowering diverse community entities. 4. Improve enrollment and retention, especially female and minority, in post-secondary education in STEM fields.II. Hands-on activities and interactive exercises A. Overview of Storm Water Project Based Educational ModelThis workshop presents theteachers and engineers with aSTEM (Science, Technology,Engineering, Mathematics)experience for implementation inhigh schools. This experienceinvolves creating a project basedmodel to engage high schoolstudents, especiallyunderrepresented and underservedstudents in science and engineeringwith a diverse and dynamic set ofcommunity entities that includehigher education, secondaryeducation, parents and caregivers,government, non-profits, andcompanies in an area of nationalimportance.Figure 1 is an outline of the strategyfor the implementation of thismodel. The middle column blocksshow some of the components for addressing the Figure1. Program Strategystorm water problem including deployment ofsensors for water quality data collection, data analysis and modeling, developing dynamicwatershed visualization map, the design of pollution mitigation strategies and a public outreachprogram. The right-hand column blocks provide the activities that the teachers and engineerscan create for students to participate in engineering and science practices.The following sections provide a brief description of these activities. For each section,appropriate materials, and where appropriate demonstration tools and equipment, will beprovided. Teachers and engineers who are interested in implementing this learning model in2015-ASEE-K12-Proposal-Form Musavi (1).docxPage 4 of 17 WORKSHOP PROPOSAL FORM 2015 Annual ASEE K-12 Workshop on Engineering Education “Authentic Engineering: Representing & Emphasizing the E in STEM” Presented by Dassault Systems Saturday, June 13, 2015 8:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. Sheraton Seattle | Seattle | WAtheir high school have the opportunity to collaborate and further learn from the presenting teamand in follow up communications and meetings. B. Sensor Network for Data collection (Module 1) 1. Engineering Design of Stationary Data Collection UnitsWith the guidance of the University of Mainefaculty from the Laboratory for SurfaceScience and Technology (LASST) and theSenator George J. Mitchell Center forEnvironmental and Watershed Research,graduate and undergraduate students havedesigned, built, and tested stationary sensorunits (Figure 2) to be placed in localcommunity waterways based on therecommendation of local water districts.After data processing using on board microcontrollers, the data will wirelessly betransmitted to a base node that is connectedto the internet. For added reliability in caseof wireless link failure, on board storageusing SD (secure digital) is available on the Figure 2. Stationary Sensor Unitunits. The power for these units will be providedthrough Lithium-Polymer highcapacity rechargeable batteries withsolar chargers to assure long termdata collection capability. Batterylife time of these units variesdepending on how often the data issampled and transmitted. Low costArduino boards have been used forbuilding these units. The wirelessnetwork topology is mesh or tandem,depending on the sampling locationsand their relative distances. IEEE802.15.4 low rate wireless PAN(personal area network) with ZigBeeprotocol stack has been used for thenetworking of these units. Theclosest node to a WiFi access pointwill serve as a gateway to transfernetwork data to a data base usingZigBee to WiFi Bridge. With training,teachers/students can program theunits for various sampling rates andtransmission strategies. Figure 3shows a section of the Penjajawoc Figure 3. A section of a watershed in City of Bangor, Maine.2015-ASEE-K12-Proposal-Form Musavi (1).docxPage 5 of 17 WORKSHOP PROPOSAL FORM 2015 Annual ASEE K-12 Workshop on Engineering Education “Authentic Engineering: Representing & Emphasizing the E in STEM” Presented by Dassault Systems Saturday, June 13, 2015 8:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. Sheraton Seattle | Seattle | WAstream that goes through forested, residential, and industrial area in the City of Bangor, Maine. Thelocations for data collection (PJ02 and PJ03) have been recommended by the community water district.In the ASEE workshop, the participating teachers and engineers will be trained on how to work with thewireless units and how to engage their students in collecting watershed data from watershed. Severaldata collecting units will be brought to the workshop for participants’ inspection and learning materials willbe distributed. Through a collaborative agreement, teachers and engineers can acquire these units fromthe University of Maine. 2. Live Data CollectionOther important watershed data that are not measurable through the stationary wireless units will becollected by students who participate as “Live Sensors,” as part of their STEM education. The dataincludes, but not limited to: turbidity, nitrate, chloride, ortho and total phosphorous, total organic carbon,dissolved oxygen (DO), oxygen reduction potential (ORP), biological oxygen demand (BOD), totalsuspended solids (TSS), Nitrate and ammonium, and Colilert. Most of the variables listed can bemeasured by commercially available water quality sensors purchased for schools and used by students.However, phosphorous, arguably the most important variable, Carbon, TSS, and Colilert will be measuredin the school laboratories. Water sample will be collected from the locations where the stationarysensors are located and brought to the schools for measurement by students. For these task, laboratoryequipments and test kits, such as spectrophotometers and colilert tests, should be acquired by theparticipating schools.In the ASEE workshop, the participating teachers and engineers will be introduced to equipment,materials, and processes for collecting some of the aforementioned data. C. Data Analysis and Modeling (module 2)The purpose of the data analysis and modeling is to build on rudiments of quality assurance, assessmentof method accuracy, statistical characterization of data, and use of data in hypothesis testing. Thefundamental concepts of measurement trueness and repeatability are needed to establish the reliabilityand utility of field and laboratory observations. Watershed data produced by students for utilization inhydrology and water quality analysis will not be trusted if not produced within a rigorous quality-controlframework [1,2]. Students will learn to correlate, interpolate, and predict time series from incomplete andspotty data [3,4,5], develop watershed management plans and present their findings.Important outcomes of students and teachers efforts will be to map out changes in hydrological conditionsand water quality as they vary by location and over time. The master variable is hydrology and how it isaltered by storm flow. Participants will use classical hydrology methods to construct storm hydrographsand derive time of concentration. These will be correlated with water chemistry to produce a time seriesrecord of concentration that can be translated to flux and mass transport. At the spatial scale of a sub-watershed in an urbanized area, the methodological framework will seek to understand howenvironmental flows contribute to degraded water quality [6,7,8]. Hydrologic variability and interactionswithin the natural and engineered components alter biogeochemical fluxes [9] and ecological integrity [10,11] all of which are affected by storm water conveyances. Advanced students will expand the analysis ofhydrologic connectivity by using: 1) landscape analysis; 2) historical water quality data; 3) observationaldata (precipitation, stage, freshwater discharge); 4) lumped parameter hydrologic modeling; 5) waterresource indexing; and 6) statistical models of associations (e.g. nonparametric functional estimation,multiple-regression modeling, and covariance structure analysis). In terms of utility for management of2015-ASEE-K12-Proposal-Form Musavi (1).docxPage 6 of 17 WORKSHOP PROPOSAL FORM 2015 Annual ASEE K-12 Workshop on Engineering Education “Authentic Engineering: Representing & Emphasizing the E in STEM” Presented by Dassault Systems Saturday, June 13, 2015 8:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. Sheraton Seattle | Seattle | WAstorm water, hydrologic connectivity is important on different hierarchical levels using existing spatial andnew field data to relate sources and discharges within drainage networks of study watersheds [12,13).It would be worthwhile to use the data to model the flux of storm water into receiving waters usinglumped-parameter simulations that allow examination and comparison of watershed outflow signatures.Model selection will be based on available data and watershed conditions [14,15,16] to achievestatistically representative flow time-series that account for the cumulative effects of precipitation,interception, evaporation, near-surface groundwater interactions, and routing. A potential output would bewater resource indices linked to water pollution events in the receiving waters [17,18].Each step of the process from establishing measurement points, to data collection, hydrologic analysis,and modeling allow students to conduct hypothesis-testing experiments. Students will be encourage todelve deeply into the components of the process and to work as a team to integrate their knowledge intosolving the broad storm water management problems. D. Data Management and Dynamic Visualization Map (module 3)Participating students enter and organize data into dynamic Google Maps & Database to create avisualization map for stream and watershed management. The process includes adding sensor data fromvarious sources into Spreadsheet Mapper from GoogleEarth Outreach program, followed by uploadingand publishing data on Google Map. High School students will follow tutorials onhttp://www.google.com/earth/outreach/tutorials/spreadsheet.html. The data will be from wirelessstationary units, results of chemical analysis of water samples, and outcomes of analysis and modeling. E. Pollution Mitigation Strategies (module 4)The watershed management plan lays out the findings and concerns; the areas in the watershed toprioritize; the best management practices (BMPs) and structural best management practices, such asinstalling green infrastructure or diverting swales or catch basin inserts, which then assist in mitigatingpollution. Higher education faculty and water district engineers will offer presentations detailing the trade-offs between infrastructure/design options, and engineering decisions based on a systematicconsideration of multiple, often competing, criteria. Through guidance from faculty and waterprofessionals, high school students will become aware of hazard mitigation strategies and will developand present their ideas and designs to their classmates, middle school students, and at science fairs.III. Materials that participants can take with themThe workshop participants will be provided with handouts for: 1) Design of wireless water sensors, 2) Operation of wireless sensors, 3) Laboratory experiments for measuring water quality data, and 4) Entering data into Google Map and visualization.IV. Practical application for teachers and studentsThis project includes activities during the summer months and academic months. During thesummer, teachers will:2015-ASEE-K12-Proposal-Form Musavi (1).docxPage 7 of 17 WORKSHOP PROPOSAL FORM 2015 Annual ASEE K-12 Workshop on Engineering Education “Authentic Engineering: Representing & Emphasizing the E in STEM” Presented by Dassault Systems Saturday, June 13, 2015 8:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. Sheraton Seattle | Seattle | WA 1) Identify and collaborate with engineers and scientists from local water district and other related industry and organizations to develop a plan for involving their expertise in students activities, 2) Identify watershed and location of data collection for stationary sensors and manual water sampling with the recommendation of water district engineers, 3) Acquire wireless sensors and install them at the identified locations, 4) Acquire laboratory equipment and prepare setups for the measurement of storm water components by students, and 5) Integrate storm water activities in the educational learning of students through existing courses, such as engineering and technology, science, and mathematics, or a dedicated new course.During the school year, students will be involved with their teachers in: 1) Collecting and managing data from stationary sensors, 2) Collecting live data samples and taking them to their schools for testing, 3) Performing data analysis and modeling, 4) Entering data into Google Earth for developing a dynamic visual map of their community watershed area, 5) Working with local water districts to prepare watershed management plans, and 6) Participate in public outreach activities.For outreach activities, students will work with peers as well as younger children (K-12) by stressing theimportance of being cognizant of storm water and how to use engineering solutions to gather informationand provide mitigation strategies. Everything that is on the ground surface, whether it be oils and greasesor pet waste or metals or fertilizers and pesticides, eventually makes its way to our waterways by way ofour storm sewers/catch basins.In developing their outreach activities, as part of their school educational activities, students will work withtheir local city water districts and local organizations. For example, the students in Maine high schoolsare working with organizations such as the Bangor Area Storm Water Group (BASWG) [19], the LakeAuburn Watershed Protection Commission (LAWPC), Maine Learning Technology Initiative (MLTI), andthe University of Maine College of Engineering. BASWG is a local organization with members from theCity of Bangor and surrounding cities, the University of Maine, University of Maine at Augusta (BangorCampus), Maine Air National Guard, Dorothea Dix Psychiatric Center, and Eastern Maine CommunityCollege, working in conjunction with the Penobscot County Soil and Water Conservation District tomanage storm water protecting the Penobscot River, the largest river in Maine. LAWPC is Maine’sprimary host institution for project WET, an award-winning international water science and educationprogram for formal and non-formal educators of K-12 students. MLTI seeks to provide professionaldevelopment and 21st Century tools to middle and high schools to support the attainment of the Mainestate standards.The public outreach component activities will include:2015-ASEE-K12-Proposal-Form Musavi (1).docxPage 8 of 17 WORKSHOP PROPOSAL FORM 2015 Annual ASEE K-12 Workshop on Engineering Education “Authentic Engineering: Representing & Emphasizing the E in STEM” Presented by Dassault Systems Saturday, June 13, 2015 8:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. Sheraton Seattle | Seattle | WA 1) Developing outreach materials such as design of Water Quality “Mascot,” cartoon character and possibly animated video, 2) Mentoring and instructing K-12 students in water quality concepts and technology through in- school demonstrations and field trips to local schools; Teams of students (2 students/team) will visit their local K-12 schools twice/year, once in the fall and once in the winter, 3) Participating and competing in state and national conferences, and 4) Participating in state Engineering Week Expo and other related outreach activities .V. BROADER IMPACTSBenefits to society: This project based learning model will benefit society in that it aims to offer a viableand cost-effective solution to the problem of storm water. This model is designed to be easily replicableand scalable nation-wide and in other issues such as renewable energy, global warming, nano-technology, and health care. The techniques, tools and materials, e.g. the stationary sensor units anddata collection and management systems—using students as “Live Sensors,” can be expanded intoroutine methods and used in other schools.Broadening participation of underrepresented groups: Each year, this model will offer education andmentoring opportunities to students and teachers in in secondary and post-secondary educationalsystems. Due to its environmental and practical approach, this model will appeal to female and minoritystudents and would promote STEM for higher education and as a career path.Advancing discovery and understanding while promoting teaching, training, and learning: Thiseducational model will train high school teachers and engage students in the area of storm water, sensortechnology, wireless communications, environmental science and data management. Outreach to middleschool teachers and students will also be a part of the program. The data collected and awarenesscreated from this project can lead to projects directly impacting our environment.VI. Educational OUTCOME AND RELATION TO NGSSThe outcomes of this educational model and their contributions to the implementation of the NextGeneration Science Standards (NGSS) in high schools are given below. : 1) Use technology tools and engineering practices for: (a) Collecting data from real world events (Module 1) (b) Understanding limitation of real data collection and its accuracy (Module 1-4) (c) Data analysis and modeling (Module 2) (d) Understanding and explaining scientific ideas (Module 4) 2) Understand and practice integrated science and engineering concepts and be able to provide solutions. The following outcomes have been linked to 9 out of 41 K-12 NGSS Disciplinary Core Ideas (CDI), as defined in [20]: (a) Physical Sciences (PS) PS4A – Wave Propagation (Module 1) PS4B – Electromagnetic Radiation (Module 1) PS4C – Information Technology and Instrumentation (Module 1) (b) Earth and Space Science (ESS) ESS2C – The role of water in earth surface processes (Module 2 & 3)2015-ASEE-K12-Proposal-Form Musavi (1).docxPage 9 of 17 WORKSHOP PROPOSAL FORM 2015 Annual ASEE K-12 Workshop on Engineering Education “Authentic Engineering: Representing & Emphasizing the E in STEM” Presented by Dassault Systems Saturday, June 13, 2015 8:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. Sheraton Seattle | Seattle | WA ESS3A – Natural Resources (Module 2) ESS3C – Human impacts on earth systems (Module 2) (c) Engineering, Technology, and Application of Science (ETS) ETS1A – Defining and delimiting and engineering problem (Module 3) ETS1B – Developing possible solutions (Module 4) ETS1C – Optimizing the design solution (Module 4)Authentic Engineering Connection. Identify and describe how you will explicitly address theways in which your lesson or activity is representative of the processes, habits of mind andpractices used by engineers, or is demonstrative of work in specific engineering fields.i At leastone of those must be within the first four listed, below; i.e., do not only check “other”. Check allthat apply: X Use of an engineering design process that has at least one iteration/improvement Attention to specific engineering habits of mind X Attention to engineering practices (as described in the NGSS/Framework and as practiced by engineers) X Attention to specific engineering careers or fields related to the lesson/activity Other (please describe below)Provide a description of how you will explicitly address these aspects of authentic engineering inyour workshop (maximum 2,000 characters):The National Research Council’s Framework [21] and the 2012 Next Generation Science Standards(NGSS) report [22] emphasize the critical role of engineering in enhancing K-12 students learning. Thefocus of the learning model presented here is to respond to this need and provide training for high schoolteacher to integrate engineering practices into their curricula. The proposed workshop addresses thespecific engineering fields selected above. For example, the design and application of wireless sensorsunder uncertain and harsh storm water environment will give the opportunity to teachers and students toencounter the limitation of engineering systems and think of solutions to improve the design andapplication of these units. For the wireless sensors, the limitations can include lack of battery power forthe operation of onboard electronics components if there are several days with the powering sun, strengthof wireless signal for transfer of information due to dense forest, hilly landscape and other obstacles, andchanging water level during high storms. In addition to the electrical and computer engineering, teachersand students will also become familiar with civil and environmental engineering practices and careers fordesigning appropriate mitigation solutions to deal with storm water issues. Finally, as explained inSection V – Educational Outcomes and Relation to NGSS – above, the learning outcome of the learningmodel addresses several NGSS Cross Disciplinary Ideas.Diversity. This year is the American Society for Engineering Education’s “Year of Action onDiversity.” It is essential that we have a diverse engineering workforce to solve diverseproblems. To do that and to have an engineering-literate public, it is essential that we reach every2015-ASEE-K12-Proposal-Form Musavi (1).docxPage 10 of 17 WORKSHOP PROPOSAL FORM 2015 Annual ASEE K-12 Workshop on Engineering Education “Authentic Engineering: Representing & Emphasizing the E in STEM” Presented by Dassault Systems Saturday, June 13, 2015 8:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. Sheraton Seattle | Seattle | WApreK-12 student with high-quality engineering education, drawing on issues of access and equityin the classroom and in the curriculum. Reviewers would like to know how your proposedworkshop will address diversity.Provide a description of how you will explicitly address diversity – e.g., diversity with respect togender/sex, ethnicity or race, special education inclusion, socio-economic status, or LGBT status– in your workshop (maximum 2,000 characters):I. Under-represented and Under-served Students and STEMIn the STEM fields—science, technology,engineering and math—women have beenhistorically underrepresented in engineeringmore than any other STEM field. Over thelast twenty years, the number of B.S. degreesconferred to women in engineering has beenabout 18% of all B.S. engineering degrees,and less than 1/3 and 1/2 of their respectiveratios in biological sciences and mathematics[23]; see Figure 1. The fact that thepercentage of female degrees inmathematics is more than twice that ofengineering suggests that females’ ability inmastering mathematics is not a factor. Arecent study [24], tracking about 1,500college-bound students over a decade, hasfound that more women had the highestscores on both the math and the verbal portionof the SAT test than their male counterparts. Figure 1. Percent Female B.S. Degrees.Apparently, only a small fraction of these high-achieving female students choose to enter engineering. Faculty in the University of Maine (UMaine)College of Engineering come in contact with many intellectually gifted female students; however, westruggle with attracting many of these students to our programs. With high salaries, a 2% unemploymentrate, and the critical role that engineering plays in our society, why aren’t there more female engineers?There are likely many explanations why there is poor recruitment and retention of women in mostengineering disciplines. One study suggests that stereotyping of the computer science workplace asmasculine has contributed to a stagnant state of females in that field [25]. The reasons certainly havemultiple origins and take numerous shapes—many are likely unique to each woman’s circumstance;however, there are some commonalities which exist in the literature: (1) the maleness of engineering[26,27,28,29]; (2) educational pipeline issues [30,31]; and (3) the absence of female scientists/engineersas role models [32,33,34,35,36].Our own experience supports the literature that females are drawn to the more environmentally focuseddisciplines, even the small percentage of females within engineering. The percentage of female2015-ASEE-K12-Proposal-Form Musavi (1).docxPage 11 of 17 WORKSHOP PROPOSAL FORM 2015 Annual ASEE K-12 Workshop on Engineering Education “Authentic Engineering: Representing & Emphasizing the E in STEM” Presented by Dassault Systems Saturday, June 13, 2015 8:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. Sheraton Seattle | Seattle | WAengineering majors at UMaine follows the national average at post-secondary institutions, approximately18%. However, UMaine’s newly developed Bioengineering and Renewable Engineering programs havea high female enrollment at more than 35%. We also surveyed first-year female students regarding theirchoice of major. When asked what type of jobs they see themselves in, our female students who wereaccepted into engineering but decided to go to a non-engineering field, often responded that they wantedto be in people-engaged and environmentally responsible careers. They felt engineering would confinethem in solitary cubicles working alone with machines—a common stereotype of engineering. While thestereotyping factor can only be resolved when there are more female engineers in the workforce, theenvironmental- and people-related factors should be used to close the gender gap in engineering.Based on this rationale, we propose an innovative participatory educational model that uses storm watermanagement and mitigation as a vehicle to attract more female and minority students to STEM,specifically engineering disciplines.Among minorities, Native American representation in engineering professions is astoundingly low. While70% of 25-year-olds with a B.S. engineering degree are White, only 0.19% are Native American (AfricanAmericans make up 4%, and Hispanics, 7%) [23]. Research studies on lack of participation of NativeAmericans in STEM is sparse; however, two recent studies [37,38] suggest that linking STEM educationto traditional values and tribal elders will improve perceptions of STEM as culturally relevant andsupportive of the Native American community, consequently igniting students’ interest in STEM.Streams, brooks, rivers, and water resources have always been of great traditional and cultural value toNative Americans not only as a means of subsistence but also for recreation. Therefore, the objective ofthis project—to develop storm water management and mitigation plans—will serve to attract students inNative American communities into STEM education.II. Storm Water Issue Connects Minorities and Women to STEMStorm water is runoff water from rain or melting snow that drains across the landscape. Runoff flows offrooftops, pavement, bare soil, and lawns, picking up pollutants along the way. It gathers in increasinglylarge amounts (from puddles, to ditches, to streams, to lakes and rivers) until it eventually flows into theocean. By carrying numerous kinds of pollution into our waterways, storm water itself becomes apollutant. Even in very small amounts, many of these pollutants can cause problems, such as heavymetals and chloride. Polluted storm water runoff is varied and ubiquitous and it is very difficult to addressits sources.Storm water management and mitigation is a pressing and expensive environmental and economical thproblem. Maine ranked 27 on the list of 30 coastal states rated for the water quality of their beaches by rda national nonprofit environmental group. The 23 annual “Testing the Waters” report revealed that 11percent of water samples from 71 Maine beaches last summer failed to meet health standards byexceeding the state’s maximum bacteria standard of 104 colonies per 100 milliliters of water sample:“The lower quality in 2012 was attributable in part to heavy rainfall last year, including the early-summerdeluge that caused millions of dollars of damage in central Maine. Beach water quality generally declinesfollowing rain storms, which cause excessive runoff of sewage, pesticides, fertilizers, oil from streets andother pollutants from land into coastal waters” [39]. In addition, storm water pollution has a great impacton the health of fisheries, which is a significant economic factor in coastal states.Treating storm water is both expensive financially and in terms of environmental and ecological costs.Polluted waterways cause species loss and deformity, and degradation of water quality decreases humanenjoyment of waterways and ecosystem health. Municipalities do not have the resources to monitor and2015-ASEE-K12-Proposal-Form Musavi (1).docxPage 12 of 17 WORKSHOP PROPOSAL FORM 2015 Annual ASEE K-12 Workshop on Engineering Education “Authentic Engineering: Representing & Emphasizing the E in STEM” Presented by Dassault Systems Saturday, June 13, 2015 8:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. Sheraton Seattle | Seattle | WAmap the flow of their storm water with the level of detail necessary; the amount of water is too great andthe sources of pollution too diverse in area and type. Due to increasing pollution levels, federalregulations on allowable storm water flows are becoming stricter.This prevalent environmental issue has significant potential to attract minority and female students, andtheir communities: students and citizens can be directly involved in improving their local water bodies.There are several programs nation-wide that have used storm water to create excellent educationalopportunities for middle and high school students and their communities. Some of these programs are:the Portland, Oregon Public School [40], the Farmington, Michigan Public School [41], City of Dallas,Texas [42], and the Environmental Protection Agency [43]. While these programs have proven thebenefit of using environmental based projects in building community efforts, none have used their projectsto bring emerging engineering technologies to an educational setting, with specific emphasis on recruitingfemale and minority students.Previous studies have shown that environmental and societal based projects have great potential toengage the interests of female and minority students [44]. This program will demonstrate how studentscan use engineering and science to address important environmental issues in their communities [45] andimprove the economic well-being of their communities. The model of this program, STEM solution-focused with diverse citizen involvement, will have nation-wide applicability and will encourage femalesand minorities.Are there any online components to the proposal or presentation? (Note that these onlinecomponents may only be available to presenters or those who have their wireless subscriptions,since wireless may not be available during the workshop sessions.) X No Yes Please describe:The only time that the presenter may need to have access to the web is to connect to the University ofMaine server is show the data already connected by the Maine high school students.Grade Level Target Audience (check all that apply): Primary (EC–2) Elementary (3–5)X Middle School (6-8)X High School (9-12)Maximum Number of Participants:50; or more as space allows If this number is greater than 25, please describe how your workshop will equally engage all participants.2015-ASEE-K12-Proposal-Form Musavi (1).docxPage 13 of 17 WORKSHOP PROPOSAL FORM 2015 Annual ASEE K-12 Workshop on Engineering Education “Authentic Engineering: Representing & Emphasizing the E in STEM” Presented by Dassault Systems Saturday, June 13, 2015 8:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. Sheraton Seattle | Seattle | WA This workshop is a presentation of the successful implementation of the University of Maine NSF- EPSCoR storm water award. Within the 75 minute allocated time for this workshop, we can only familiarize the participants with three main components of the project: 1) wireless data acquisition system, 2) laboratory testing of water quality components, and 3) integration of the model in high school curricula. The participating teachers and engineers who are interested in implementing this educational model in their schools, can then follow up with the presenters for further training through future NSF awards or other collaborative agreements. These further trainings, which may take from 3-5 days, can be arranged in follow up workshops at the University of Maine or the interested school with smaller group of teachers and engineers. In the ASEE Workshop, the wireless data acquisition system will be presented by Dr. Ali Abedi who will demonstrate the wireless sensors and familiarize the audience with the design and functionality of the system. The hard copy operational manual for working with the system, data collection, and data entry into Google Map will be distributed. Mr. Cary James will present the laboratory procedures for testing storm water and integration of the learning model in high school curriculum. He will also explain the relevance of the educational model in satisfying the requirements of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). He will also provide hard copy materials for the topics covered.All Seating is Classroom (tables and chairs).Audio Visual Equipment Requests:Note: An LCD projector, screen and podium with attached microphone are provided. Requestsfor additional equipment or resources (e.g., internet connection or laptops) will incur extracharges. If you do not have additional requests, please indicate with “Not applicable.”Internet Access Reminder:Presenters must register and pay the registration fee to support their workshop attendance and audio/video costs. Thank you for completing this proposal form! Please review this document prior to submitting it to ensure that all items are complete. ASEE USE ONLYDate Received:Received By:Proposal ID Number:2015-ASEE-K12-Proposal-Form Musavi (1).docxPage 14 of 17 WORKSHOP PROPOSAL FORM 2015 Annual ASEE K-12 Workshop on Engineering Education “Authentic Engineering: Representing & Emphasizing the E in STEM” Presented by Dassault Systems Saturday, June 13, 2015 8:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. Sheraton Seattle | Seattle | WAVII. REFERENCES[1] Peckenham, J., T. Thornton, and P. Peckenham (2012) Validation of Student Generated Data for Assessment of Groundwater Quality, Jour. Sci. Educ. and Tech., 21:287-294.[2] Thornton, T. and J. Leahy. 2012. 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Musavi, M., & James, C. E., & Abedi, A. (2015, June), Engineering Solutions to Storm Water Problems Through Community Participation Paper presented at 2015 ASEE Workshop on K-12 Engineering Education, Seattle, Washington. https://peer.asee.org/17109

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