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Engineering World Health: Lessons Learned From Six Years Of Undergraduate Service Learning In The Developing World

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Conference

2008 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Publication Date

June 22, 2008

Start Date

June 22, 2008

End Date

June 25, 2008

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Unique Student Opportunities in BME

Tagged Division

Biomedical

Page Count

8

Page Numbers

13.531.1 - 13.531.8

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/3279

Download Count

31

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Paper Authors

biography

Robert Malkin Duke University

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Dr. Robert Malkin is the director of Engineering World Health and a Professor of the Practice of Biomedical Engineering at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Engineering World Health: Lessons Learned from Six Years of Undergraduate Service- Learning in the Developing World

Abstract

Engineering World Health is a fusion of engineers, scientists and physicians donating their time and talents to improve healthcare in disadvantaged areas around the world. The Duke University-Engineering World Health (Duke-EWH) Summer Institute is a unique study abroad program that offers engineering students an opportunity to receive hands-on technical skills in a foreign country.

The summer begins with an intensive, four-week training session and ends with a four-week internship in a developing world hospital. Students install and repair equipment, train the staff, take inventory, solve problems and perform many other engineering duties at the hospital. Objective measures of success include the fact that the students have placed back into service over 1000 pieces of medical equipment in 23 of the world’s poorest hospitals. Students in the program have gained over 30,000 hours of hands-on experience working with medical equipment in the clinical setting.

With over 100 alumni of the program, Duke-EWH has amassed a significant amount of understanding of what works and what does not. For example, we now have a post-experience conference. We place students in pairs in developing world hospitals. Our training month now includes information on how to train across cultural and linguistic barriers.

Introduction

Engineering World Health is a fusion of engineers, scientists and physicians donating their time and talents to improve healthcare in disadvantaged areas around the world. The Duke University-Engineering World Health (Duke-EWH) Summer Institute is a unique study abroad program that offers engineering students an opportunity to receive hands-on technical skills in a foreign country. The program is open to undergraduate and graduate students in engineering, chemistry or physics degree programs.

With over 100 alumni of the program, Duke-EWH has amassed a significant amount of understanding what works and what does not. This paper reviews some of the most effective and least effective of these policies.

First, however, a bit of background on the structure of EWH might be helpful. EWH is a non- profit organization based in Memphis, TN. EWH subcontracts all aspects of running the Duke- EWH Summer Institute to Duke University, with the exception of maintaining relationships with the hospitals, a responsibility that rests with EWH. The Duke-EWH summer institute is run by the Director and Assistant Director with 2-3 part-time staff being brought in as needed during the spring and fall. During the summer, an additional 4 US staff and 2 local staff are engaged to live and work with the students in their host countries.

Malkin, R. (2008, June), Engineering World Health: Lessons Learned From Six Years Of Undergraduate Service Learning In The Developing World Paper presented at 2008 Annual Conference & Exposition, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. https://peer.asee.org/3279

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