Asee peer logo

Enhancing And Assessing Life Long Learning Skills Through Capstone Projects

Download Paper |

Conference

2008 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Publication Date

June 22, 2008

Start Date

June 22, 2008

End Date

June 25, 2008

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

Assessment of Engineering Technology Programs

Tagged Division

Engineering Technology

Page Count

12

Page Numbers

13.536.1 - 13.536.12

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/3244

Download Count

41

Request a correction

Paper Authors

biography

Jyhwen Wang Texas A&M University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-9016-0566

visit author page

Jyhwen Wang joined the Department of Engineering Technology and Industrial Distribution at Texas A&M University in 2001 after working 10 years as a researcher and R&D manager in steel industry. He teaches mechanical design applications and his research interest is in the areas of mechanical design and material processing technology. He received his Ph. D. degree in mechanical engineering from Northwestern University.

visit author page

biography

Alex Fang Texas A&M University

visit author page

Alex Fang is an assistant professor in the Department of Engineering Technology and Industrial Distribution at Texas A&M University. Prior to joining Texas A&M, he was an researcher at KBSI in College Station, Texas. He received his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from Texas A&M University. Dr. Fang's teaching and research interests are in manufacturing processes , nondestructive testing technologies, and acoustic noise reduction.

visit author page

biography

Michael Johnson Texas A&M University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-5328-8763

visit author page

Johnson is an assistant professor in the Department of Engineering Technology and Industrial Distribution at Texas A&M University. Prior to joining the faculty at Texas A&M, he was a senior product development engineer at the 3M Corporate Research Laboratory in St. Paul, Minnesota. He received his S.M. and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Johnson’s research focuses on the cost modeling and analysis of product development and manufacturing systems.

visit author page

Download Paper |

Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Enhancing and Assessing Life Long Learning Skills through Capstone Projects

Abstract

With rapid advances in new technology, graduates from an engineering technology program have to constantly acquire new knowledge and skills during their professional career. Thus, one of the ABET program outcomes requires students to recognize the need for, and an ability to engage in lifelong learning. In most of the Engineering Technology (ET) programs, capstone projects are designed for students to utilize their technical knowledge, problem solving skills, and project management skills to develop a product or a system related to their discipline. This paper presents a methodology of utilizing the capstone course as a vehicle to enhance and assess student’s life long learning skills. During the semester long course, one student team signed up to learn the subject of adhesive technology that is not taught in the current curriculum. The student team designed and built an adhesive test apparatus that can be used for outreach activities. Another student team was assigned to learn rapid prototyping. The student team installed a Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) rapid prototyping machine and designed and produced FDM parts for demonstrations. To assess student learning, surveys on students’ knowledge and skill in adhesive technology and rapid prototyping were conducted at the beginning and the end of the semester. The paper summarizes the survey results and discusses the students’ self learning experience.

1. Introduction

Preparing students to become lifelong learners is one of the most important functions of college education. Lifelong learners are more likely to succeed as they can quickly acquire new knowledge and skills to perform well in their jobs. Therefore, one of the ABET program outcomes requires students to recognize the need for, and an ability to engage in lifelong learning1. While engineering or engineering technology programs seldom offer specific course to teach lifelong learning skills, there are various means to prepare students to meet this ABET criterion. One of such means is to provide opportunities to encourage and evaluate self learning. Students who are capable of self learning are better prepared to become a lifelong learners.

This paper reports the experience of using a capstone course as a vehicle to enhance and assess student’s self learning skills. Capstone project course which integrates theory, design, and construction is a common requirement for engineering technology programs2. In the Manufacturing and Mechanical Engineering Technology (MMET) program at Texas A&M University, the capstone course is designed for students to acquire valuable integrating experience. With the prerequisite, the students enrolled in the course have the required technical competency and the background in fundamentals of project and people management. The projects are normally selected from a list of problems provided by faculty members or industry advisors. In addition to the instructor of the capstone course, a faculty member or an industry advisor serves as a “sponsor” of the project. Student teams are organized to match students’ backgrounds and interests with the proposed problems. Student teams, consisting of three to five students per team, make their own decisions on work hours and job assignments. If a project involves implementing the students’ design, a budget normally is available from the project

Wang, J., & Fang, A., & Johnson, M. (2008, June), Enhancing And Assessing Life Long Learning Skills Through Capstone Projects Paper presented at 2008 Annual Conference & Exposition, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. https://peer.asee.org/3244

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2008 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015