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Enhancing Precalculus Curricula With E Learning: Implementation And Assessment

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Conference

2008 Annual Conference & Exposition

Location

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Publication Date

June 22, 2008

Start Date

June 22, 2008

End Date

June 25, 2008

ISSN

2153-5965

Conference Session

The Use of Computers in Teaching Mathematics

Tagged Division

Mathematics

Page Count

14

Page Numbers

13.550.1 - 13.550.14

Permanent URL

https://peer.asee.org/3998

Download Count

27

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Paper Authors

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Janet Callahan Boise State University Orcid 16x16 orcid.org/0000-0001-6665-1584

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Janet M. Callahan is Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at Boise State University. She received a Ph.D. in Materials Science, a M.S. in Metallurgy and a B.S. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Connecticut. Her current research interests include freshman engineering programs, recruitment and retention issues in engineering, biomedical device development and the development and characterization of biomaterials.

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Seung Youn Chyung Boise State University

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Yonnie Chyung is Associate Professor in the Department of Instructional and Performance
Technology at Boise State University. She received her Doctor of Education degree in
Instructional Technology from Texas Tech University, and her Master’s degree in Curriculum
and Instruction, with a specialization in Computer-based Education, from Southern Illinois
University, Carbondale, IL. Her research interests have been focused on the development of
self-regulated learning strategies for adult learners, and online teaching and learning. She is
currently conducting research on retention issues in online distance education.

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Joanna Guild Boise State University

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Joanna Guild is Special Lecturer for the Department of Mathematics at Boise State University. She obtained her M.S. in Mathematics from Boise State University and a B.A. in Mathematics from Kenyon College.

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William Clement Boise State University

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William P. Clement is Associate Research Professor at the Center for Geophysical Investigation of the Shallow Subsurface at Boise State University. His research interests include using near-surface geophysical methods such as Ground Penetrating Radar reflection data and cross-hole GPR tomography to better understand processes in the shallow subsurface.

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Joe Guarino Boise State University

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Joe Guarino is a Professor in the Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering Department at Boise State University. His research interests include simulation modeling for engineering education, vibrations and acoustics.

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Doug Bullock Boise State University

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Doug Bullock is Chair and Associate Professor of Mathematics at Boise State University. His research interests are quantum topology, quantum algebra and representation theory, with particular emphasis on applications to knot theory and the topology of 3-manifolds.

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Cheryl Schrader Boise State University

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Cheryl B. Schrader is Dean of the College of Engineering and Professor of Electrical and
Computer Engineering at Boise State University. Dean Schrader has an extensive record of
publications and sponsored research in the systems, control and engineering education fields. She received the 2005 Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring from the White House for an enduring, strong and personal commitment to underrepresented engineering students and faculty.

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Abstract
NOTE: The first page of text has been automatically extracted and included below in lieu of an abstract

Enhancing Precalculus Curricula with E-Learning: Implementation and Assessment

Abstract

During Fall semester of 2007, a semester-long, quasi-experimental study was conducted at Boise State University to investigate the effectiveness of a systematically sequenced and managed, self-paced e-learning activity on improving students’ academic performance and motivation. A total of 125 students enrolled in 3 different sections of a Precalculus class participated in the study. The e-learning activity was implemented in 2 of the 3 sections as a required homework assignment. Students enrolled in one of the 2 selected sections were all engineering majors. The 3rd section was a control group that did not use the e-learning activity. A pre-test, measuring students’ entry-knowledge levels, was administered at the beginning of the semester, and a post- test was administered at the end of the semester. Students’ learning styles were measured with the Gregorc Style Delineator™. Then, the relationships among the students’ learning styles, their academic performance, and self-regulated studying behaviors such as the number of hours they spent on weekly e-learning homework assignments were investigated. This study revealed that using an e-learning activity as a homework assignment improved students’ knowledge in Precalculus about the same as did traditional homework that was collected, graded and returned daily. Moreover, we found that different types of learning styles were associated with different degrees of knowledge improvement in Precalculus. Several recommendations on instructional strategies related to students’ learning styles are discussed.

Introduction

To facilitate learning processes and to help students produce successful learning, especially during the early years of their study, educators often seek innovative instructional technology. One such technology is e-learning. Presently, e-learning is already deeply integrated into school curricula to motivate students and facilitate learning. Numerous studies have revealed the benefits of implementing self-paced e-learning strategies in traditional curricula for improving critical learning variables such as motivation, self-efficacy, goal-orientation, satisfaction, and persistence.1 Especially, there has been a fair amount of acceptance and practice among the community of science and engineering education community that traditional teaching can be greatly benefited by incorporating e-learning strategies.2-6 Leading academic organizations such as the Sloan Consortium also advocate that incorporating online learning strategies into the engineering curricula can augment some of the ABET engineering competencies.2

E-learning is also ideal for individualized learning. In contrast to lecture-based classroom learning, computer-based learning programs allow students to adjust the pace, sequence and method of learning to better fit their learning behavior and needs. A study by Yoshioka, Nishizawa, and Tsukamoto7 revealed that individualized exercises improved calculating skills of engineering students in a fundamental mathematics class. A significant advantage associated with e-learning is that students can learn at their own convenience and are less dependent on the

Callahan, J., & Chyung, S. Y., & Guild, J., & Clement, W., & Guarino, J., & Bullock, D., & Schrader, C. (2008, June), Enhancing Precalculus Curricula With E Learning: Implementation And Assessment Paper presented at 2008 Annual Conference & Exposition, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. https://peer.asee.org/3998

ASEE holds the copyright on this document. It may be read by the public free of charge. Authors may archive their work on personal websites or in institutional repositories with the following citation: © 2008 American Society for Engineering Education. Other scholars may excerpt or quote from these materials with the same citation. When excerpting or quoting from Conference Proceedings, authors should, in addition to noting the ASEE copyright, list all the original authors and their institutions and name the host city of the conference. - Last updated April 1, 2015